lk_hmdb

NameDescriptionLinkID
metabolite_name ; hmdb_id
(S)-3-Hydroxyisobutyric acid ; HMDB0000023 (S)-3-Hydroxyisobutyric acid, also known as (S)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpropanoate or 3-hydroxy-isobutyrate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom (S)-3-Hydroxyisobutyric acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa) (S)-3-Hydroxyisobutyric acid has been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, (S)-3-hydroxyisobutyric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria (S)-3-Hydroxyisobutyric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans (S)-3-Hydroxyisobutyric acid can be converted into (S)-methylmalonic acid semialdehyde through the action of the enzymes 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase, mitochondrial and enoyl-CoA hydratase, mitochondrial. In humans, (S)-3-hydroxyisobutyric acid is involved in the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway (S)-3-Hydroxyisobutyric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, the maple syrup urine disease pathway, the propionic acidemia pathway, and methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency.
(S)C(S)S-S-Methylcysteine sulfoxide ; HMDB0029432 (S)c(S)S-S-Methylcysteine sulfoxide, also known as kale anemia factor or S-methyl-L-cysteinesulfoxide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon) (S)c(S)S-S-Methylcysteine sulfoxide exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, (S)c(S)S-S-methylcysteine sulfoxide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, (S)c(S)S-S-methylcysteine sulfoxide can be found in brassicas, garden onion, and onion-family vegetables. This makes (S)c(S)S-S-methylcysteine sulfoxide a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
1,1-Dimethylbiguanide ; HMDB0001921 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide, also known as la-6023metformin or glucophage, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as biguanides. These are organic compounds containing two N-linked guanidines. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide is a drug which is used for use as an adjunct to diet and exercise in adult patients (18 years and older) with niddm. may also be used for the management of metabolic and reproductive abnormalities associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (pcos). jentadueto is for the treatment of patients when both linagliptin and metformin is appropriate. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very strong basic compound (based on its pKa). 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide has been found in human liver, skeletal muscle and muscle tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, 1,1-dimethylbiguanide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide can be biosynthesized from biguanide. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide has a bitter taste. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide is a potentially toxic compound.
1,1-Dimethylbiguanide ; HMDB01921 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide, also known as la-6023metformin or glucophage, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as biguanides. These are organic compounds containing two N-linked guanidines. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide is a drug which is used for use as an adjunct to diet and exercise in adult patients (18 years and older) with niddm. may also be used for the management of metabolic and reproductive abnormalities associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (pcos). jentadueto is for the treatment of patients when both linagliptin and metformin is appropriate. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very strong basic compound (based on its pKa). 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide has been found in human liver, skeletal muscle and muscle tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, 1,1-dimethylbiguanide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide can be biosynthesized from biguanide. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide has a bitter taste. 1,1-Dimethylbiguanide is a potentially toxic compound.
1,11-Undecanedicarboxylic acid ; HMDB0002327 Brassylic acid, also known as brassilate or tridecanedioate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Brassylic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Brassylic acid has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, brassylic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene ; HMDB0013733 Pseudocumene, also known as pseudocumol or psi-cumene, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as benzene and substituted derivatives. These are aromatic compounds containing one monocyclic ring system consisting of benzene. Pseudocumene exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Pseudocumene has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, pseudocumene is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Pseudocumene exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Pseudocumene can be converted into 2,3,5-trimethylphenol. Pseudocumene is a plastic tasting compound that can be found in black walnut and corn. This makes pseudocumene a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Pseudocumene is a potentially toxic compound.
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene ; HMDB13733 Pseudocumene, also known as pseudocumol or psi-cumene, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as benzene and substituted derivatives. These are aromatic compounds containing one monocyclic ring system consisting of benzene. Pseudocumene exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Pseudocumene has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, pseudocumene is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Pseudocumene exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Pseudocumene can be converted into 2,3,5-trimethylphenol. Pseudocumene is a plastic tasting compound that can be found in black walnut and corn. This makes pseudocumene a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Pseudocumene is a potentially toxic compound.
1,3,7-Trimethyluric acid ; HMDB0002123 1,3,7-Trimethyluric acid, also known as 8-oxy-caffeine or 1,3,7-trimethylate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 1,3,7-Trimethyluric acid is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1,3,7-Trimethyluric acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 1,3,7-trimethyluric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1,3,7-Trimethyluric acid can be biosynthesized from caffeine through the action of the enzymes cytochrome P450 1A2, cytochrome P450 3A4, cytochrome P450 2C8, cytochrome P450 2C9, and cytochrome P450 2E1. In humans, 1,3,7-trimethyluric acid is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, 1,3,7-trimethyluric acid can be found in a number of food items such as burbot, adzuki bean, colorado pinyon, and corn salad. This makes 1,3,7-trimethyluric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
1,3-Dimethyluric acid ; HMDB0001857 1,3-Dimethyluric acid, also known as 1,3-dimethylate or oxytheophylline, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 1,3-Dimethyluric acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1,3-Dimethyluric acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 1,3-dimethyluric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1,3-Dimethyluric acid can be biosynthesized from 7,9-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6,8(3H)-trione.
1,3-Dimethyluric acid ; HMDB01857 1,3-Dimethyluric acid, also known as 1,3-dimethylate or oxytheophylline, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 1,3-Dimethyluric acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1,3-Dimethyluric acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 1,3-dimethyluric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1,3-Dimethyluric acid can be biosynthesized from 7,9-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6,8(3H)-trione.
1,7-Dimethyluric acid ; HMDB0011103 1,7-Dimethyluric acid, also known as 17-dimethylate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 1,7-Dimethyluric acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1,7-Dimethyluric acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 1,7-dimethyluric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1,7-Dimethyluric acid can be biosynthesized from paraxanthine; which is mediated by the enzymes cytochrome P450 1A2 and cytochrome P450 2A6. In humans, 1,7-dimethyluric acid is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway.
1,7-Dimethyluric acid ; HMDB11103 1,7-Dimethyluric acid, also known as 17-dimethylate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 1,7-Dimethyluric acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1,7-Dimethyluric acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 1,7-dimethyluric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1,7-Dimethyluric acid can be biosynthesized from paraxanthine; which is mediated by the enzymes cytochrome P450 1A2 and cytochrome P450 2A6. In humans, 1,7-dimethyluric acid is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway.
1-Methyladenosine ; HMDB0003331 1-Methyladenosine, also known as M1A, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. 1-Methyladenosine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methyladenosine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 1-methyladenosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methyladenosine can be biosynthesized from adenosine.
1-Methyladenosine ; HMDB03331 1-Methyladenosine, also known as M1A, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. 1-Methyladenosine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methyladenosine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 1-methyladenosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methyladenosine can be biosynthesized from adenosine.
1-Methylguanine ; HMDB0003282 1-Methylguanine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 6-oxopurines. These are purines that carry a C=O group at position 6. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. 1-Methylguanine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 1-methylguanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
1-Methylguanine ; HMDB03282 1-Methylguanine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 6-oxopurines. These are purines that carry a C=O group at position 6. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. 1-Methylguanine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 1-methylguanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
1-Methylguanosine ; HMDB0001563 1-Methylguanosine, also known as M1G or TRMD protein, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. 1-Methylguanosine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methylguanosine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood.
1-Methylguanosine ; HMDB01563 1-Methylguanosine, also known as M1G or TRMD protein, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. 1-Methylguanosine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methylguanosine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood.
1-Methylhistamine ; HMDB0000898 1-Methylhistamine, also known as H137, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 2-arylethylamines. These are primary amines that have the general formula RCCNH2, where R is an organic group. 1-Methylhistamine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very strong basic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methylhistamine has been found in human bone marrow and brain tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, blood, feces, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 1-methylhistamine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methylhistamine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, S-Adenosylhomocysteine and 1-methylhistamine can be biosynthesized from S-adenosylmethionine and histamine through the action of the enzyme histamine N-methyltransferase. In addition, 1-Methylhistamine can be converted into methylimidazole acetaldehyde; which is catalyzed by the enzyme amine oxidase [flavin-containing] a. In humans, 1-methylhistamine is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. 1-Methylhistamine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway.
1-Methylhistamine ; HMDB00898 1-Methylhistamine, also known as H137, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 2-arylethylamines. These are primary amines that have the general formula RCCNH2, where R is an organic group. 1-Methylhistamine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very strong basic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methylhistamine has been found in human bone marrow and brain tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, blood, feces, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 1-methylhistamine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methylhistamine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, S-Adenosylhomocysteine and 1-methylhistamine can be biosynthesized from S-adenosylmethionine and histamine through the action of the enzyme histamine N-methyltransferase. In addition, 1-Methylhistamine can be converted into methylimidazole acetaldehyde; which is catalyzed by the enzyme amine oxidase [flavin-containing] a. In humans, 1-methylhistamine is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. 1-Methylhistamine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway.
1-Methylhistidine ; HMDB0000001 1-Methylhistidine, also known as 1-mhis, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as histidine and derivatives. Histidine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. 1-Methylhistidine has been found in human muscle and skeletal muscle tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, blood, and feces. Within the cell, 1-methylhistidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methylhistidine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 1-Methylhistidine and Beta-alanine can be converted into anserine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme carnosine synthase 1. In addition, Beta-Alanine and 1-methylhistidine can be biosynthesized from anserine; which is mediated by the enzyme cytosolic non-specific dipeptidase. In humans, 1-methylhistidine is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. 1-Methylhistidine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway.
1-Methylhistidine ; HMDB00001 1-Methylhistidine, also known as 1-mhis, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as histidine and derivatives. Histidine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. 1-Methylhistidine has been found in human muscle and skeletal muscle tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, blood, and feces. Within the cell, 1-methylhistidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methylhistidine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 1-Methylhistidine and Beta-alanine can be converted into anserine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme carnosine synthase 1. In addition, Beta-Alanine and 1-methylhistidine can be biosynthesized from anserine; which is mediated by the enzyme cytosolic non-specific dipeptidase. In humans, 1-methylhistidine is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. 1-Methylhistidine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway.
1-Methylinosine ; HMDB0002721 1-Methylinosine, also known as m(1)I, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. 1-Methylinosine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methylinosine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 1-methylinosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methylinosine can be biosynthesized from inosine.
1-Methylnicotinamide ; HMDB0000699 1-Methylnicotinamide, also known as trigonellinamide or trigonellamide chloride, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as nicotinamides. These are heterocyclic aromatic compounds containing a pyridine ring substituted at position 3 by a carboxamide group. 1-Methylnicotinamide is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 1-Methylnicotinamide has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 1-methylnicotinamide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methylnicotinamide exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 1-Methylnicotinamide participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, S-Adenosylhomocysteine and 1-methylnicotinamide can be biosynthesized from S-adenosylmethionine and niacinamide through its interaction with the enzyme nicotinamide N-methyltransferase. In addition, 1-Methylnicotinamide can be converted into N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide through the action of the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In humans, 1-methylnicotinamide is involved in the nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism pathway.
1-Methylnicotinamide ; HMDB00699 1-Methylnicotinamide, also known as trigonellinamide or trigonellamide chloride, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as nicotinamides. These are heterocyclic aromatic compounds containing a pyridine ring substituted at position 3 by a carboxamide group. 1-Methylnicotinamide is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 1-Methylnicotinamide has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 1-methylnicotinamide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methylnicotinamide exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 1-Methylnicotinamide participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, S-Adenosylhomocysteine and 1-methylnicotinamide can be biosynthesized from S-adenosylmethionine and niacinamide through its interaction with the enzyme nicotinamide N-methyltransferase. In addition, 1-Methylnicotinamide can be converted into N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide through the action of the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In humans, 1-methylnicotinamide is involved in the nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism pathway.
1-Methyluric acid ; HMDB0003099 1-Methyluric acid, also known as 1-methylurate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 1-Methyluric acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methyluric acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 1-methyluric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methyluric acid can be biosynthesized from 1-methylxanthine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase. In humans, 1-methyluric acid is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway.
1-Methyluric acid ; HMDB03099 1-Methyluric acid, also known as 1-methylurate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 1-Methyluric acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methyluric acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 1-methyluric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methyluric acid can be biosynthesized from 1-methylxanthine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase. In humans, 1-methyluric acid is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway.
1-Methylxanthine ; HMDB0010738 1-Methylxanthine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 1-Methylxanthine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 1-Methylxanthine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 1-methylxanthine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1-Methylxanthine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 1-Methylxanthine and formaldehyde can be biosynthesized from theophylline through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 1A2. In addition, 1-Methylxanthine can be converted into 1-methyluric acid through its interaction with the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase. In humans, 1-methylxanthine is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway.
10-HDoHE ; HMDB0060037 10-Hdohe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. 10-Hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 10-Hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 10-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
10-HDoHE ; HMDB60037 10-Hdohe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. 10-Hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 10-Hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 10-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
10Z-Heptadecenoic acid ; HMDB0060038 , also known as 17:1 N-7 cis or fa(17:1(10Z)), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, urine, and feces. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
10Z-Heptadecenoic acid ; HMDB60038 , also known as 17:1 N-7 cis or fa(17:1(10Z)), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, urine, and feces. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
10Z-Nonadecenoic acid ; HMDB0013622 , also known as fa(19:1(10Z)) or 10-nonadecenoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
10Z-Nonadecenoic acid ; HMDB13622 , also known as fa(19:1(10Z)) or 10-nonadecenoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
11(R)-HETE ; HMDB0004682 , also known as 11-hete, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
11(R)-HETE ; HMDB04682 , also known as 11-hete, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
11-HDoHE ; HMDB0060040 11-Hdohe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. 11-Hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 11-Hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 11-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
11-HDoHE ; HMDB60040 11-Hdohe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. 11-Hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 11-Hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 11-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
11Z-Eicosenoic acid ; HMDB0002231 cis-Gondoic acid, also known as 11-eicosenoic acid or (11Z)-eicosenoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. cis-Gondoic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. cis-Gondoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, cis-gondoic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. cis-Gondoic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, N-(11Z-icosenoyl)-sphingosine-1-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-(11Z-eicosenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and N-gondoylethanolamine. Outside of the human body, cis-gondoic acid can be found in a number of food items such as pomegranate, rocket salad (ssp.), fishes, and brassicas. This makes cis-gondoic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
11Z-Eicosenoic acid ; HMDB02231 cis-Gondoic acid, also known as 11-eicosenoic acid or (11Z)-eicosenoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. cis-Gondoic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. cis-Gondoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, cis-gondoic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. cis-Gondoic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, N-(11Z-icosenoyl)-sphingosine-1-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-(11Z-eicosenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and N-gondoylethanolamine. Outside of the human body, cis-gondoic acid can be found in a number of food items such as pomegranate, rocket salad (ssp.), fishes, and brassicas. This makes cis-gondoic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
12,13-DHOME ; HMDB0004705 12,13-Dihome, also known as 12,13-dhoa or isoleukotoxin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, 12,13-dihome is considered to be an octadecanoid lipid molecule. 12,13-Dihome is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 12,13-Dihome has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, 12,13-dihome is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
12,13-DHOME ; HMDB04705 12,13-Dihome, also known as 12,13-dhoa or isoleukotoxin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, 12,13-dihome is considered to be an octadecanoid lipid molecule. 12,13-Dihome is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 12,13-Dihome has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, 12,13-dihome is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
12-HEPE ; HMDB0010202 (+/-)-12-hepe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and five CC double bonds. Thus, (+/-)-12-hepe is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule (+/-)-12-hepe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule (+/-)-12-hepe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, (+/-)-12-hepe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
12-HEPE ; HMDB10202 (+/-)-12-hepe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and five CC double bonds. Thus, (+/-)-12-hepe is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule (+/-)-12-hepe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule (+/-)-12-hepe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, (+/-)-12-hepe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
12-HETE ; HMDB0006111 , also known as 12-R-hete, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been primarily detected in saliva, blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. has been found to be associated with the diseases known as cerebral vasospasm; has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including peroxisomal biogenesis defect.
12-HETE ; HMDB06111 , also known as 12-R-hete, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been primarily detected in saliva, blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. has been found to be associated with the diseases known as cerebral vasospasm; has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including peroxisomal biogenesis defect.
13-Methylmyristic acid ; HMDB0061707 Isopentadecylic acid, also known as iso-C15 or 13-MTD, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Isopentadecylic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Isopentadecylic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, isopentadecylic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Isopentadecylic acid can be converted into isopentadecanoyl-CoA.
13S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid ; HMDB0004667 13S-Hode, also known as 13-HODD or 13-lox, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, 13S-hode is considered to be an octadecanoid lipid molecule. 13S-Hode is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 13S-Hode has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 13S-hode is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
13S-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid ; HMDB04667 13S-Hode, also known as 13-HODD or 13-lox, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, 13S-hode is considered to be an octadecanoid lipid molecule. 13S-Hode is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 13S-Hode has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 13S-hode is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
14-HDoHE ; HMDB0060044 14-Hdohe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. 14-Hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 14-Hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 14-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
14-HDoHE ; HMDB60044 14-Hdohe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. 14-Hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 14-Hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 14-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
15(S)-HETE ; HMDB0003876 15S-Hete, also known as icomucret or 15(S)-hete, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, 15S-hete is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. 15S-Hete is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 15S-Hete has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 15S-hete is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, 15S-hete is involved in the celecoxib action pathway, the antrafenine action pathway, the fenoprofen action pathway, and the nabumetone action pathway. 15S-Hete is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency and the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway. 15S-Hete has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including peroxisomal biogenesis defect.
15(S)-HETE ; HMDB03876 15S-Hete, also known as icomucret or 15(S)-hete, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, 15S-hete is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. 15S-Hete is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 15S-Hete has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 15S-hete is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, 15S-hete is involved in the celecoxib action pathway, the antrafenine action pathway, the fenoprofen action pathway, and the nabumetone action pathway. 15S-Hete is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency and the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway. 15S-Hete has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including peroxisomal biogenesis defect.
15-Methylpalmitate ; HMDB0061709 15-Methylpalmitate, also known as 15-methylhexadecanoate, is a fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). It has an exact mass of 269.25 g/mol and the molecular formula is C17H33O2. Methylpalmitate is a biomarker for the consumption of butte
16-HDoHE ; HMDB0060047 16-Hdohe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. 16-Hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 16-Hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 16-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
16-HDoHE ; HMDB60047 16-Hdohe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. 16-Hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 16-Hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 16-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
16-Hydroxy hexadecanoic acid ; HMDB0006294
16-Hydroxy hexadecanoic acid ; HMDB06294
16a-hydroxy DHEA 3-sulfate ; HMDB0062544 16a-Hydroxy dhea 3-sulfate belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sulfated steroids. These are sterol lipids containing a sulfate group attached to the steroid skeleton. 16a-Hydroxy dhea 3-sulfate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 16a-Hydroxy dhea 3-sulfate has been found in human hepatic tissue, and has also been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, 16a-hydroxy dhea 3-sulfate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
17-HDoHE ; HMDB0010213 (+/-)-17-hdohe, also known as 17-hydroxy-dha or 17(R)hdohe, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Thus, (+/-)-17-hdohe is considered to be a docosanoid lipid molecule (+/-)-17-hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule (+/-)-17-hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, (+/-)-17-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome (+/-)-17-hdohe can be biosynthesized from all-cis-docosa-4,7,10,13,16,19-hexaenoic acid.
17-HDoHE ; HMDB10213 (+/-)-17-hdohe, also known as 17-hydroxy-dha or 17(R)hdohe, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Thus, (+/-)-17-hdohe is considered to be a docosanoid lipid molecule (+/-)-17-hdohe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule (+/-)-17-hdohe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, (+/-)-17-hdohe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome (+/-)-17-hdohe can be biosynthesized from all-cis-docosa-4,7,10,13,16,19-hexaenoic acid.
17-Methylstearate ; HMDB0061710 Isononadecanoic acid, also known as 17-methylstearic acid or 17-methyl-octadecanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Isononadecanoic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Isononadecanoic acid has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, isononadecanoic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Isononadecanoic acid can be biosynthesized from octadecanoic acid. Outside of the human body, isononadecanoic acid can be found in fishes. This makes isononadecanoic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
17-Methylstearate ; HMDB61710 Isononadecanoic acid, also known as 17-methylstearic acid or 17-methyl-octadecanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Isononadecanoic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Isononadecanoic acid has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, isononadecanoic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Isononadecanoic acid can be biosynthesized from octadecanoic acid. Outside of the human body, isononadecanoic acid can be found in fishes. This makes isononadecanoic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
1H-Indole-3-acetamide ; HMDB0029739 1H-Indole-3-acetamide, also known as auxin amide or 2-(3-indolyl)acetamide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 3-alkylindoles. 3-alkylindoles are compounds containing an indole moiety that carries an alkyl chain at the 3-position. 1H-Indole-3-acetamide exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 1H-indole-3-acetamide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1H-Indole-3-acetamide can be biosynthesized from acetamide. Outside of the human body, 1H-indole-3-acetamide can be found in a number of food items such as epazote, cowpea, passion fruit, and japanese persimmon. This makes 1H-indole-3-acetamide a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
1H-Indole-3-acetamide ; HMDB29739 1H-Indole-3-acetamide, also known as auxin amide or 2-(3-indolyl)acetamide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 3-alkylindoles. 3-alkylindoles are compounds containing an indole moiety that carries an alkyl chain at the 3-position. 1H-Indole-3-acetamide exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 1H-indole-3-acetamide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 1H-Indole-3-acetamide can be biosynthesized from acetamide. Outside of the human body, 1H-indole-3-acetamide can be found in a number of food items such as epazote, cowpea, passion fruit, and japanese persimmon. This makes 1H-indole-3-acetamide a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
1H-Indole-3-carboxaldehyde ; HMDB0029737 1H-Indole-3-carboxaldehyde, also known as indole-3-aldehyde or 3-formylindole, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indoles. Indoles are compounds containing an indole moiety, which consists of pyrrole ring fused to benzene to form 2,3-benzopyrrole. 1H-Indole-3-carboxaldehyde exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 1H-indole-3-carboxaldehyde is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, 1H-indole-3-carboxaldehyde can be found in a number of food items such as garden tomato, cucumber, brussel sprouts, and barley. This makes 1H-indole-3-carboxaldehyde a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
2,4-Dihydroxybutanoic acid ; HMDB0000360 2,4-Dihydroxy-butanoic acid, also known as 2,4-dihydroxybutyrate or 3-deoxytetronic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. 2,4-Dihydroxy-butanoic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2,4-Dihydroxy-butanoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid.
2-Aminobenzoic acid ; HMDB0001123 2-Aminobenzoic acid, also known as anthranilate or anthranilic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aminobenzoic acids. These are benzoic acids containing an amine group attached to the benzene moiety. 2-Aminobenzoic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Aminobenzoic acid has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 2-aminobenzoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. 2-Aminobenzoic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 2-Aminobenzoic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 2-Aminobenzoic acid and formic acid can be biosynthesized from formylanthranilic acid through the action of the enzyme kynurenine formamidase. Furthermore, 2-Aminobenzoic acid and L-alanine can be biosynthesized from L-kynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynureninase. Furthermore, Pyruvic acid, L-glutamic acid, and 2-aminobenzoic acid can be biosynthesized from chorismate and L-glutamine through its interaction with the enzyme anthranilate synthase component. Finally, 2-Aminobenzoic acid and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate can be converted into N-(5-phosphoribosyl)-anthranilate through the action of the enzyme anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase. In humans, 2-aminobenzoic acid is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, 2-aminobenzoic acid can be found in a number of food items such as alpine sweetvetch, corn, garden tomato, and conch. This makes 2-aminobenzoic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. 2-Aminobenzoic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
2-Aminoheptanoate ; HMDB0094649 2-Aminoheptanoate, also known as a-aminoenanthate or 2-aminoenanthic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). 2-Aminoheptanoate is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Aminoheptanoate has been primarily detected in feces.
2-aminophenol sulphate ; HMDB0061116 2-Aminophenol sulphate belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylsulfates. Phenylsulfates are compounds containing a sulfuric acid group conjugated to a phenyl group. 2-Aminophenol sulphate is slightly soluble (in water) and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Aminophenol sulphate can be biosynthesized from 2-aminophenol.
2-Ethylhydracrylic acid ; HMDB0000396 2-Ethyl-hydracrylic acid, also known as 2-(hydroxymethyl)-butyrate or 3-hydroxy-2-ethylpropanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 2-Ethyl-hydracrylic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Ethyl-hydracrylic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 2-ethyl-hydracrylic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Ethyl-hydracrylic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type V and short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency; 2-ethyl-hydracrylic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type ii, x-linked.
2-Fucosyllactose ; HMDB0002098 2-Fucosyllactose belongs to the class of organic compounds known as oligosaccharides. These are carbohydrates made up of 3 to 10 monosaccharide units linked to each other through glycosidic bonds. 2-Fucosyllactose is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Fucosyllactose has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and breast milk.
2-Furoylglycine ; HMDB0000439 2-Furoylglycine, also known as pyromucurate or pyromucuric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. 2-Furoylglycine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Furoylglycine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 2-furoylglycine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 2-Furoylglycine can be biosynthesized from 2-furoic acid.
2-Furoylglycine ; HMDB00439 2-Furoylglycine, also known as pyromucurate or pyromucuric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. 2-Furoylglycine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Furoylglycine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 2-furoylglycine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 2-Furoylglycine can be biosynthesized from 2-furoic acid.
2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid ; HMDB0000407 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid, also known as 2-hydroxyisovaleric acid or 3-methyl-2-hydroxybutyric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid has been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid can be biosynthesized from isovaleric acid. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid can also be converted into 2-hydroxyisovaleryl-CoA. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency; 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including maple syrup urine disease.
2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid ; HMDB00407 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid, also known as 2-hydroxyisovaleric acid or 3-methyl-2-hydroxybutyric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid has been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid can be biosynthesized from isovaleric acid. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid can also be converted into 2-hydroxyisovaleryl-CoA. 2-Hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency; 2-hydroxy-3-methylbutyric acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including maple syrup urine disease.
2-Hydroxy-3-methylpentanoic acid ; HMDB0000317 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid, also known as 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-valerate or (2R,3R)-2-hydroxy-3-methylpentanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, feces, and urine. Within the cell, 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including maple syrup urine disease.
2-Hydroxy-3-methylpentanoic acid ; HMDB00317 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid, also known as 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-valerate or (2R,3R)-2-hydroxy-3-methylpentanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, feces, and urine. Within the cell, 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 2-Hydroxy-3-methyl-pentanoic acid has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including maple syrup urine disease.
2-Hydroxyadipic acid ; HMDB0000321 2-Hydroxyadipic acid, also known as 2-hydroxyadipate or 2,3,4-trideoxyhexarate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. 2-Hydroxyadipic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxyadipic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 2-hydroxyadipic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Hydroxyadipic acid can be biosynthesized from adipic acid. 2-Hydroxyadipic acid is a potentially toxic compound. 2-Hydroxyadipic acid has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including 2-ketoadipic acidemia and alpha-aminoadipic aciduria.
2-Hydroxybutyric acid ; HMDB0000008 (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid, also known as 2-hydroxybutanoic acid or alpha-hydroxybutyrate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the adjacent carbon (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa) (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, feces, sweat, and saliva. Within the cell, (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid is involved in the propanoate metabolism pathway (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the methylmalonic aciduria due to cobalamin-related disorders pathway, the malonic aciduria pathway, and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency and schizophrenia; (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.
2-Hydroxybutyric acid ; HMDB00008 (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid, also known as 2-hydroxybutanoic acid or alpha-hydroxybutyrate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the adjacent carbon (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa) (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, feces, sweat, and saliva. Within the cell, (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid is involved in the propanoate metabolism pathway (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the methylmalonic aciduria due to cobalamin-related disorders pathway, the malonic aciduria pathway, and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency and schizophrenia; (+/-)alpha-hydoxy butyric acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.
2-Hydroxydecanoate ; HMDB0094656 2-hydroxydecanoate, also known as alpha-Hydroxycaprate or a-Hydroxycapric acid, is classified as a member of the medium-chain fatty acids. Medium-chain fatty acids are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. 2-hydroxydecanoate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and a weak acidic compound. 2-hydroxydecanoate can be found in feces.
2-Hydroxyglutarate ; HMDB0059655 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid, also known as alpha-hydroxyglutarate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid has been found in human brain tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, saliva, blood, and feces. Within the cell, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid is involved in the oncogenic action OF 2-hydroxyglutarate pathway, the oncogenic action OF succinate pathway, and the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway. 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the oncogenic action OF D-2-hydroxyglutarate in hydroxygluaricaciduria pathway and the oncogenic action OF L-2-hydroxyglutarate in hydroxygluaricaciduria pathway. 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as eosinophilic esophagitis and deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures syndrome; 2-hydroxyglutaric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including l-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, d-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, and glutaric aciduria II.
2-Hydroxyglutarate ; HMDB59655 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid, also known as alpha-hydroxyglutarate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid has been found in human brain tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, saliva, blood, and feces. Within the cell, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid is involved in the oncogenic action OF 2-hydroxyglutarate pathway, the oncogenic action OF succinate pathway, and the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway. 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the oncogenic action OF D-2-hydroxyglutarate in hydroxygluaricaciduria pathway and the oncogenic action OF L-2-hydroxyglutarate in hydroxygluaricaciduria pathway. 2-Hydroxyglutaric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as eosinophilic esophagitis and deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures syndrome; 2-hydroxyglutaric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including l-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, d-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, and glutaric aciduria II.
2-Hydroxyhexadecanoic acid ; HMDB0031057 2R-Hydroxypalmitic acid, also known as (R)-2-hydroxypalmitate or (2R)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. 2R-Hydroxypalmitic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. 2R-Hydroxypalmitic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, 2R-hydroxypalmitic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. 2R-Hydroxypalmitic acid can be converted into (R)-2-hydroxyhexadecanoyl-CoA.
2-Hydroxyhexadecanoylcarnitine ; HMDB0013337 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
2-Hydroxyhexadecanoylcarnitine ; HMDB13337 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
2-Hydroxyibuprofen ; HMDB0060920 2-Hydroxyibuprofen is a metabolite of ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for relief of symptoms of arthritis, fever, as an analgesic (pain reliever), especially where there is an inflammatory component, and dysmenorrhea. Ibuprofen is known to have an antiplatelet effect, though it is relatively mild and somewhat short-lived when compared with aspirin or other better-known antiplatelet drugs. (Wikipedia)
2-Hydroxymyristic acid ; HMDB0002261 2-Hydroxymyristic acid, also known as a-hydroxymyristate or a-hydroxy-N-tetradecylate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. 2-Hydroxymyristic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 2-Hydroxymyristic acid has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, 2-hydroxymyristic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
2-Hydroxymyristic acid ; HMDB02261 2-Hydroxymyristic acid, also known as a-hydroxymyristate or a-hydroxy-N-tetradecylate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. 2-Hydroxymyristic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 2-Hydroxymyristic acid has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, 2-hydroxymyristic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
2-Hydroxystearic acid ; HMDB0062549 DL-2-Hydroxy stearic acid, also known as a-hydroxyoctadecanoate or a-hydroxystearate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. DL-2-Hydroxy stearic acid is a very hydrophobic molecule, practically insoluble (in water), and relatively neutral. DL-2-Hydroxy stearic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, DL-2-hydroxy stearic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. DL-2-Hydroxy stearic acid can be converted into 2-hydroxystearoyl-CoA and N-2-hydroxystearoylsphingosine.
2-Isopropylmalic acid ; HMDB0000402 2-Isopropyl-malic acid, also known as (2s)-2-isopropylmalate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 2-Isopropyl-malic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Isopropyl-malic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, feces, and urine. Within the cell, 2-isopropyl-malic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Isopropyl-malic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, 2-isopropyl-malic acid can be found in a number of food items such as celery stalks, potato, winter savory, and agar. This makes 2-isopropyl-malic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
2-Ketobutyric acid ; HMDB0000005 3-Methyl pyruvic acid, also known as alpha-ketobutyric acid or 2-oxobutyric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain keto acids and derivatives. These are keto acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. 3-Methyl pyruvic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Methyl pyruvic acid has been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 3-methyl pyruvic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 3-Methyl pyruvic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, 3-methyl pyruvic acid is involved in the methionine metabolism pathway, the selenoamino acid metabolism pathway, the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, and the threonine and 2-oxobutanoate degradation pathway. 3-Methyl pyruvic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency, homocystinuria, cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency, the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, and the hypermethioninemia pathway. Outside of the human body, 3-methyl pyruvic acid can be found in a number of food items such as dock, common persimmon, nutmeg, and common pea. This makes 3-methyl pyruvic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
2-Methylguanosine ; HMDB0005862 2-Methylguanosine, also known as M2G, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. 2-Methylguanosine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
2-Methylguanosine ; HMDB05862 2-Methylguanosine, also known as M2G, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. 2-Methylguanosine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
2-Piperidinone ; HMDB0011749 2-Piperidinone, also known as alpha-piperidone or 2-oxo-piperidine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as piperidinones. Piperidinones are compounds containing a piperidine ring which bears a ketone. 2-Piperidinone exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Piperidinone has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, saliva, and blood.
2-trans,4-cis-Decadienoylcarnitine ; HMDB0013325 2-trans,4-cis-Decadienoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as fatty acid esters. These are carboxylic ester derivatives of a fatty acid. 2-trans,4-cis-Decadienoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 2-trans,4-cis-Decadienoylcarnitine has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, 2-trans,4-cis-decadienoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
2-trans,4-cis-Decadienoylcarnitine ; HMDB13325 2-trans,4-cis-Decadienoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as fatty acid esters. These are carboxylic ester derivatives of a fatty acid. 2-trans,4-cis-Decadienoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 2-trans,4-cis-Decadienoylcarnitine has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, 2-trans,4-cis-decadienoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
21-Deoxycortisol ; HMDB0004030 21-Deoxycortisol belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gluco/mineralocorticoids, progestogins and derivatives. These are steroids with a structure based on a hydroxylated prostane moiety. 21-Deoxycortisol is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 21-Deoxycortisol has been found in human hepatic tissue, testicle and endocrine gland tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 21-deoxycortisol is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 21-Deoxycortisol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 21-Deoxycortisol can be converted into 11b-hydroxyprogesterone; which is catalyzed by the enzyme steroid 17-alpha-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase. In addition, 21-Deoxycortisol can be converted into cortisol through its interaction with the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase. In humans, 21-deoxycortisol is involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. 21-Deoxycortisol is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome pathway, 21-hydroxylase deficiency (cyp21), corticosterone methyl oxidase I deficiency (cmo I), and corticosterone methyl oxidase II deficiency - cmo II.
21-Deoxycortisol ; HMDB04030 21-Deoxycortisol belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gluco/mineralocorticoids, progestogins and derivatives. These are steroids with a structure based on a hydroxylated prostane moiety. 21-Deoxycortisol is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 21-Deoxycortisol has been found in human hepatic tissue, testicle and endocrine gland tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 21-deoxycortisol is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 21-Deoxycortisol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 21-Deoxycortisol can be converted into 11b-hydroxyprogesterone; which is catalyzed by the enzyme steroid 17-alpha-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase. In addition, 21-Deoxycortisol can be converted into cortisol through its interaction with the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase. In humans, 21-deoxycortisol is involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. 21-Deoxycortisol is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome pathway, 21-hydroxylase deficiency (cyp21), corticosterone methyl oxidase I deficiency (cmo I), and corticosterone methyl oxidase II deficiency - cmo II.
3 beta-Hydroxy-5-cholestenoate ; HMDB0012453 3 beta-Hydroxy-5-cholestenoate, also known as 3-hcoa or 3-hydroxy-5-cholesten-26-Oic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as monohydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are bile acids, alcohols or any of their derivatives bearing a hydroxyl group. 3 beta-Hydroxy-5-cholestenoate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 3 beta-Hydroxy-5-cholestenoate has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, 3 beta-hydroxy-5-cholestenoate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 3 beta-Hydroxy-5-cholestenoate participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3 beta-Hydroxy-5-cholestenoate can be biosynthesized from 27-hydroxycholesterol; which is catalyzed by the enzyme sterol 26-hydroxylase, mitochondrial. In addition, 3 beta-Hydroxy-5-cholestenoate can be converted into 3 beta,7 alpha-dihydroxy-5-cholestenoate through its interaction with the enzyme 25-hydroxycholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase. In humans, 3 beta-hydroxy-5-cholestenoate is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway. 3 beta-Hydroxy-5-cholestenoate is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include 27-hydroxylase deficiency, the zellweger syndrome pathway, and the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway.
3, 5-Tetradecadiencarnitine ; HMDB0013331 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
3, 5-Tetradecadiencarnitine ; HMDB13331 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid ; HMDB0000375 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, also known as dihydro-3-coumaric acid or b-(m-hydroxyphenyl)propionate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylpropanoic acids. Phenylpropanoic acids are compounds with a structure containing a benzene ring conjugated to a propanoic acid. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid can be biosynthesized from propionic acid. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid can also be converted into 3-(m-hydroxyphenyl)propanoyl-CoA.
3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid ; HMDB00375 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, also known as dihydro-3-coumaric acid or b-(m-hydroxyphenyl)propionate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylpropanoic acids. Phenylpropanoic acids are compounds with a structure containing a benzene ring conjugated to a propanoic acid. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid can be biosynthesized from propionic acid. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid can also be converted into 3-(m-hydroxyphenyl)propanoyl-CoA.
3-Amino-2-piperidone ; HMDB0000323 3-Amino-2-piperidone, also known as cyclo-ornithine or 3-aminopiperidine-2-one, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acid amides. These are amide derivatives of alpha amino acids. 3-Amino-2-piperidone is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Amino-2-piperidone has been primarily detected in sweat.
3-Aminoisobutanoic acid ; HMDB0003911 3-Amino-isobutanoic acid, also known as 3-aminoisobutanoate or beta-aminoisobutyric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids having a (-NH2) group attached to the beta carbon atom. 3-Amino-isobutanoic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Amino-isobutanoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 3-amino-isobutanoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 3-Amino-isobutanoic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, 3-amino-isobutanoic acid is involved in the pyrimidine metabolism pathway. 3-Amino-isobutanoic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include Beta ureidopropionase deficiency, UMP synthase deficiency (orotic aciduria), the mngie (mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy) pathway, and dihydropyrimidinase deficiency.
3-Carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid ; HMDB0061112 , also known as CMPF or u(3,3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as furanoid fatty acids. These are fatty acids containing a 5-alkylfuran-2-alkanoic acid. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. is a potentially toxic compound.
3-Carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid ; HMDB61112 , also known as CMPF or u(3,3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as furanoid fatty acids. These are fatty acids containing a 5-alkylfuran-2-alkanoic acid. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. is a potentially toxic compound.
3-Hydroxy-11Z-octadecenoylcarnitine ; HMDB0013339 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
3-Hydroxy-11Z-octadecenoylcarnitine ; HMDB13339 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid ; HMDB0001476 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid, also known as 2-amino-3-hydroxy-benzoate or 3-ohaa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. Hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives are compounds containing a hydroxybenzoic acid (or a derivative), which is a benzene ring bearing a carboxyl and a hydroxyl groups. 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid has been found in human epidermis and bladder tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid and L-alanine can be biosynthesized from L-3-hydroxykynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynureninase. Furthermore, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid can be converted into cinnavalininate through its interaction with the enzyme catalase. Furthermore, L-Alanine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid can be biosynthesized from 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine through its interaction with the enzyme kynureninase. Furthermore, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid can be converted into 2-amino-3-carboxymuconic acid semialdehyde; which is catalyzed by the enzyme 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase. Furthermore, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid can be converted into 2-amino-3-carboxymuconic acid semialdehyde through the action of the enzyme 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase. Finally, L-Alanine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid can be biosynthesized from 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine; which is mediated by the enzyme kynureninase. In humans, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway.
3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid ; HMDB01476 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid, also known as 2-amino-3-hydroxy-benzoate or 3-ohaa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. Hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives are compounds containing a hydroxybenzoic acid (or a derivative), which is a benzene ring bearing a carboxyl and a hydroxyl groups. 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid has been found in human epidermis and bladder tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid and L-alanine can be biosynthesized from L-3-hydroxykynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynureninase. Furthermore, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid can be converted into cinnavalininate through its interaction with the enzyme catalase. Furthermore, L-Alanine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid can be biosynthesized from 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine through its interaction with the enzyme kynureninase. Furthermore, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid can be converted into 2-amino-3-carboxymuconic acid semialdehyde; which is catalyzed by the enzyme 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase. Furthermore, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid can be converted into 2-amino-3-carboxymuconic acid semialdehyde through the action of the enzyme 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase. Finally, L-Alanine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid can be biosynthesized from 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine; which is mediated by the enzyme kynureninase. In humans, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway.
3-Hydroxycapric acid ; HMDB0002203 , also known as myrmicacin or 3-hydroxycaprate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with a 6 to 12 carbon atoms long side chain. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. can be biosynthesized from decanoic acid.
3-Hydroxycapric acid ; HMDB02203 , also known as myrmicacin or 3-hydroxycaprate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with a 6 to 12 carbon atoms long side chain. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. can be biosynthesized from decanoic acid.
3-Hydroxydodecanoic acid ; HMDB0000387 Beta-Hydroxylauric acid, also known as 3-hydroxy-dodecanoate or 3-OH dodecanoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with a 6 to 12 carbon atoms long side chain. Beta-Hydroxylauric acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Beta-Hydroxylauric acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, Beta-hydroxylauric acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Beta-Hydroxylauric acid can be biosynthesized from dodecanoic acid.
3-hydroxyhexanoic acid ; HMDB0061652 DL-3-Hydroxy caproic acid, also known as 3-hydroxycaproate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with a 6 to 12 carbon atoms long side chain. DL-3-Hydroxy caproic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). DL-3-Hydroxy caproic acid can be converted into ethyl 3-hydroxyhexanoate.
3-Hydroxyhippuric acid ; HMDB0006116 3-Hydroxyhippuric acid, also known as 3-hydroxybenzoylglycine or 3-hydroxyhippate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hippuric acids. Hippuric acids are compounds containing hippuric acid, which consists of a of a benzoyl group linked to the N-terminal of a glycine. 3-Hydroxyhippuric acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Hydroxyhippuric acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 3-hydroxyhippuric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 3-Hydroxyhippuric acid can be biosynthesized from N-benzoylglycine.
3-Hydroxyisovaleric acid ; HMDB0000754 3-Hydroxy-isovaleric acid, also known as HMB-D6 or 3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 3-Hydroxy-isovaleric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Hydroxy-isovaleric acid has been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 3-hydroxy-isovaleric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 3-Hydroxy-isovaleric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-hydroxy-isovaleric acid can be biosynthesized from isovaleric acid and butyric acid. 3-Hydroxy-isovaleric acid can also be converted into 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine and 3-hydroxyisovaleryl-CoA. 3-Hydroxy-isovaleric acid is a potentially toxic compound. 3-Hydroxy-isovaleric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type VI and lung cancer; 3-hydroxy-isovaleric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including biotinidase deficiency, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I.
3-Hydroxymethylglutaric acid ; HMDB0000355 3-Hydroxymethylglutaric acid, also known as meglutol or dicrotalic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 3-Hydroxymethylglutaric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Hydroxymethylglutaric acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and urine. Within the cell, 3-hydroxymethylglutaric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 3-Hydroxymethylglutaric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-hydroxymethylglutaric acid can be biosynthesized from glutaric acid. 3-Hydroxymethylglutaric acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, viscumneoside vii, viscumneoside iv, and yanuthone D. Outside of the human body, 3-hydroxymethylglutaric acid can be found in flaxseed. This makes 3-hydroxymethylglutaric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. 3-Hydroxymethylglutaric acid is a potentially toxic compound. 3-Hydroxymethylglutaric acid has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.
3-Hydroxymyristate ; HMDB0094672 , also known as 14:0(3-oh), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, can be biosynthesized from tetradecanoic acid. can also be converted into 3-hydroxytetradecanoyl-CoA.
3-Hydroxyoctanoic acid ; HMDB0001954 3-Hydroxy caprylic acid, also known as 3-hydroxy-octanoate or 3-OH octanoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with a 6 to 12 carbon atoms long side chain. 3-Hydroxy caprylic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Hydroxy caprylic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-hydroxy caprylic acid can be biosynthesized from octanoic acid. 3-Hydroxy caprylic acid can also be converted into 3-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA.
3-Hydroxyoctanoic acid ; HMDB01954 3-Hydroxy caprylic acid, also known as 3-hydroxy-octanoate or 3-OH octanoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with a 6 to 12 carbon atoms long side chain. 3-Hydroxy caprylic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Hydroxy caprylic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-hydroxy caprylic acid can be biosynthesized from octanoic acid. 3-Hydroxy caprylic acid can also be converted into 3-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA.
3-Hydroxysebacic acid ; HMDB0000350 3-Hydroxy-sebacic acid, also known as 3-hydroxy-decanedioate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with a 6 to 12 carbon atoms long side chain. 3-Hydroxy-sebacic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Hydroxy-sebacic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. 3-Hydroxy-sebacic acid can be biosynthesized from sebacic acid. 3-Hydroxy-sebacic acid has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.
3-Indolebutyric acid ; HMDB0002096 3-Indolebutyric acid, also known as indolebutyrate or 1H-indole-3-butanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 3-alkylindoles. 3-alkylindoles are compounds containing an indole moiety that carries an alkyl chain at the 3-position. 3-Indolebutyric acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. 3-Indolebutyric acid has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, 3-indolebutyric acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). 3-Indolebutyric acid can be biosynthesized from butyric acid.
3-Methoxytyrosine ; HMDB0001434 3-Methoxytyrosine, also known as 3-O-methyldopa or vanilalanine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tyrosine and derivatives. Tyrosine and derivatives are compounds containing tyrosine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of tyrosine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. 3-Methoxytyrosine is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Methoxytyrosine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. 3-Methoxytyrosine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as epilepsy, early-onset, vitamin b6-dependent and pyridoxamine 5-prime-phosphate oxidase deficiency; 3-methoxytyrosine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency.
3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid ; HMDB0000491 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid, also known as 3-methyl-2-oxopentanoate or 2-oxo-3-methylvalerate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain keto acids and derivatives. These are keto acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, blood, feces, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-isoleucine and oxoglutaric acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In addition, 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid and thiamine pyrophosphate can be converted into 2-methyl-1-hydroxypropyl-THPP; which is mediated by the enzyme 2-oxoisovalerate dehydrogenase. In humans, 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is involved in the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway. 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, the isovaleric acidemia pathway, 3-hydroxyisobutyric acid dehydrogenase deficiency, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency. 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is a potentially toxic compound.
3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid ; HMDB00491 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid, also known as 3-methyl-2-oxopentanoate or 2-oxo-3-methylvalerate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain keto acids and derivatives. These are keto acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, blood, feces, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-isoleucine and oxoglutaric acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In addition, 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid and thiamine pyrophosphate can be converted into 2-methyl-1-hydroxypropyl-THPP; which is mediated by the enzyme 2-oxoisovalerate dehydrogenase. In humans, 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is involved in the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway. 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, the isovaleric acidemia pathway, 3-hydroxyisobutyric acid dehydrogenase deficiency, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency. 3-Methyl-2-oxovaleric acid is a potentially toxic compound.
3-Methyladipic acid ; HMDB0000555 3-Methyladipic acid, also known as 3-methyladipate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. 3-Methyladipic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Methyladipic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 3-methyladipic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome.
3-Methyladipic acid ; HMDB00555 3-Methyladipic acid, also known as 3-methyladipate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. 3-Methyladipic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Methyladipic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 3-methyladipic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome.
3-Methylglutaconic acid ; HMDB0000522 3E-Methylglutaconic acid, also known as 3E-methylglutaconate or 3-methyl-2-pentenedioic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methyl-branched fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an acyl chain that has a methyl branch. Usually, they are saturated and contain only one or more methyl group. However, branches other than methyl may be present. 3E-Methylglutaconic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3E-Methylglutaconic acid has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, 3E-methylglutaconic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 3E-Methylglutaconic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3E-methylglutaconic acid can be biosynthesized from (e)-glutaconic acid. 3E-Methylglutaconic acid can also be converted into trans-3-methylglutaconyl-CoA. 3E-Methylglutaconic acid is a potentially toxic compound. 3E-Methylglutaconic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type VI and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type VII; 3e-methylglutaconic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency, 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type ii, x-linked, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I.
3-Methylhistidine ; HMDB0000479 N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine, also known as 3-methylhistidine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as histidine and derivatives. Histidine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine has been found in human prostate, muscle and skeletal muscle tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, blood, saliva, and urine. Within the cell, N(pros)-methyl-L-histidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, N(pros)-methyl-L-histidine is involved in the methylhistidine metabolism pathway, the Beta-alanine metabolism pathway, and the histidine metabolism pathway. N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include gaba-transaminase deficiency, the carnosinuria, carnosinemia pathway, the histidinemia pathway, and ureidopropionase deficiency.
3-Methylhistidine ; HMDB00479 N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine, also known as 3-methylhistidine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as histidine and derivatives. Histidine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine has been found in human prostate, muscle and skeletal muscle tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, blood, saliva, and urine. Within the cell, N(pros)-methyl-L-histidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, N(pros)-methyl-L-histidine is involved in the methylhistidine metabolism pathway, the Beta-alanine metabolism pathway, and the histidine metabolism pathway. N(pros)-Methyl-L-histidine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include gaba-transaminase deficiency, the carnosinuria, carnosinemia pathway, the histidinemia pathway, and ureidopropionase deficiency.
3-Methylxanthine ; HMDB0001886 3-Methylxanthine, also known as 3 MX or purine analog, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 3-Methylxanthine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Methylxanthine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 3-methylxanthine is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
3-Methylxanthine ; HMDB01886 3-Methylxanthine, also known as 3 MX or purine analog, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. 3-Methylxanthine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Methylxanthine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 3-methylxanthine is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
3-Oxocholic acid ; HMDB0000502 3-Oxocholic acid, also known as 3-dehydrocholate or 3-oxocholate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. 3-Oxocholic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 3-Oxocholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, 3-oxocholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 3-Oxocholic acid can be converted into 3-oxocholoyl-CoA.
3-Phosphoglyceric acid ; HMDB0000807 3-Phosphoglyceric acid, also known as glycerate 3-phosphate or 3-PG, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar acids and derivatives. Sugar acids and derivatives are compounds containing a saccharide unit which bears a carboxylic acid group. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Phosphoglyceric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and blood. Within the cell, 3-phosphoglyceric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-Phosphoglyceric acid can be biosynthesized from glyceric acid through the action of the enzyme glycerate kinase. Furthermore, 3-Phosphoglyceric acid can be converted into phosphohydroxypyruvic acid through the action of the enzyme D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. Finally, 3-Phosphoglyceric acid can be converted into glyceric acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glycerate kinase. In humans, 3-phosphoglyceric acid is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, the triosephosphate isomerase pathway, the D-glyceric acidura pathway, and the starch and sucrose metabolism pathway. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway, cancer (via the Warburg effect), and glycerol kinase deficiency.
3-Phosphoglyceric acid ; HMDB00807 3-Phosphoglyceric acid, also known as glycerate 3-phosphate or 3-PG, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar acids and derivatives. Sugar acids and derivatives are compounds containing a saccharide unit which bears a carboxylic acid group. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Phosphoglyceric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and blood. Within the cell, 3-phosphoglyceric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-Phosphoglyceric acid can be biosynthesized from glyceric acid through the action of the enzyme glycerate kinase. Furthermore, 3-Phosphoglyceric acid can be converted into phosphohydroxypyruvic acid through the action of the enzyme D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. Finally, 3-Phosphoglyceric acid can be converted into glyceric acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glycerate kinase. In humans, 3-phosphoglyceric acid is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, the triosephosphate isomerase pathway, the D-glyceric acidura pathway, and the starch and sucrose metabolism pathway. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway, cancer (via the Warburg effect), and glycerol kinase deficiency.
3-Sulfinoalanine ; HMDB0000996 3-Sulfinoalanine, also known as cysteine-S-dioxide or cysteine sulfinate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. 3-Sulfinoalanine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-Sulfinoalanine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 3-sulfinoalanine is primarily located in the mitochondria. 3-Sulfinoalanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 3-Sulfinoalanine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 3-Sulfinoalanine can be biosynthesized from L-cysteine through its interaction with the enzyme cysteine dioxygenase type 1. Furthermore, 3-Sulfinoalanine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into 3-sulfinylpyruvic acid and L-glutamic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase, cytoplasmic. Furthermore, 3-Sulfinoalanine can be biosynthesized from L-cysteine through the action of the enzyme cysteine dioxygenase type 1. Finally, 3-Sulfinoalanine can be converted into hypotaurine through its interaction with the enzyme cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase. In humans, 3-sulfinoalanine is involved in the cystinosis, ocular nonnephropathic pathway, the taurine and hypotaurine metabolism pathway, and the cysteine metabolism pathway. 3-Sulfinoalanine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the Beta-mercaptolactate-cysteine disulfiduria pathway.
4,5-Dihydroorotic acid ; HMDB0000528 4,5-Dihydroorotic acid, also known as hydroorotate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon), or a derivative thereof. 4,5-Dihydroorotic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4,5-Dihydroorotic acid has been found in human prostate tissue. Within the cell, 4,5-dihydroorotic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 4,5-Dihydroorotic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 4,5-Dihydroorotic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 4,5-Dihydroorotic acid can be biosynthesized from N-carbamoyl-L-aspartate through its interaction with the enzyme dihydroorotase. In addition, 4,5-Dihydroorotic acid and ubiquinone-1 can be converted into ubiquinol-1 and orotic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, type 2.
4-Acetamidobutanoic acid ; HMDB0003681 4-Acetamidobutanoic acid, also known as N4-acetylaminobutanoate or N-acetyl-4-aminobutyric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids having a (-NH2) group attached to the gamma carbon atom. 4-Acetamidobutanoic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4-Acetamidobutanoic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. 4-Acetamidobutanoic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, 4-acetamidobutanoic acid can be found in a number of food items such as cocoa bean, yellow zucchini, mustard spinach, and ginkgo nuts. This makes 4-acetamidobutanoic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
4-Acetamidobutanoic acid ; HMDB03681 4-Acetamidobutanoic acid, also known as N4-acetylaminobutanoate or N-acetyl-4-aminobutyric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids having a (-NH2) group attached to the gamma carbon atom. 4-Acetamidobutanoic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4-Acetamidobutanoic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. 4-Acetamidobutanoic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, 4-acetamidobutanoic acid can be found in a number of food items such as cocoa bean, yellow zucchini, mustard spinach, and ginkgo nuts. This makes 4-acetamidobutanoic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
4-ethylphenylsulfate ; HMDB0062551 4-Ethylphenylsulfate belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylsulfates. Phenylsulfates are compounds containing a sulfuric acid group conjugated to a phenyl group. 4-Ethylphenylsulfate has been primarily detected in blood. 4-Ethylphenylsulfate can be biosynthesized from 4-ethylphenol.
4-Guanidinobutanoic acid ; HMDB0003464 4-Guanidinobutanoic acid, also known as gamma-guanidinobutyrate or 4-(carbamimidamido)butanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids having a (-NH2) group attached to the gamma carbon atom. 4-Guanidinobutanoic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4-Guanidinobutanoic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 4-guanidinobutanoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 4-Guanidinobutanoic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, 4-guanidinobutanoic acid can be found in apple, french plantain, and loquat. This makes 4-guanidinobutanoic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
4-Hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid ; HMDB0002070 4-Hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid, also known as 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate or 4-hydroxy-2-ketoglutarate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma-keto acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing an aldehyde substituted with a keto group on the C4 carbon atom. 4-Hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid is primarily located in the mitochondria. 4-Hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 4-Hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid and L-aspartic acid can be biosynthesized from 4-hydroxy-L-glutamic acid and oxalacetic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase, cytoplasmic. In humans, 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid is involved in the arginine and proline metabolism pathway. 4-Hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hyperprolinemia type II pathway, L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency, ornithine aminotransferase deficiency (oat deficiency), and creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency.
4-Hydroxyhippuric acid ; HMDB0013678 4-Hydroxyhippuric acid, also known as 4-hydroxybenzoylglycine or 4-hydroxyhippate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hippuric acids. Hippuric acids are compounds containing hippuric acid, which consists of a of a benzoyl group linked to the N-terminal of a glycine. 4-Hydroxyhippuric acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4-Hydroxyhippuric acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. 4-Hydroxyhippuric acid can be biosynthesized from N-benzoylglycine.
4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid ; HMDB0000707 (4-Hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid, also known as 4-hydroxy a-oxobenzenepropanoate or hppa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylpyruvic acid derivatives. Phenylpyruvic acid derivatives are compounds containing a phenylpyruvic acid moiety, which consists of a phenyl group substituted at the second position by an pyruvic acid (4-Hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa) (4-Hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, (4-hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria (4-Hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, (4-hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid is involved in the disulfiram action pathway, the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway, and the tyrosine metabolism pathway (4-Hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the tyrosinemia type 3 (tyro3) pathway, the alkaptonuria pathway, the phenylketonuria pathway, and the tyrosinemia type I pathway. Outside of the human body, (4-hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid can be found in a number of food items such as red raspberry, pak choy, enokitake, and spinach. This makes (4-hydroxyphenyl)pyruvic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
4-Hydroxyproline ; HMDB0000725 trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline, also known as hydroxyproline or Hyp, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as proline and derivatives. Proline and derivatives are compounds containing proline or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of proline at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline is a drug which is used in france as a combination product for the treatment of small, superficial wounds. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline is primarily located in the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline is involved in the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway and the oncogenic action OF succinate pathway. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hyperornithinemia with gyrate atrophy (hoga) pathway, the hyperprolinemia type I pathway, the hyperprolinemia type II pathway, and L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline is a potentially toxic compound. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline has been found to be associated with several diseases known as hemodialysis and alzheimer's disease; trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including hydroxyprolinemia and iminoglycinuria.
4-Hydroxyproline ; HMDB00725 trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline, also known as hydroxyproline or Hyp, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as proline and derivatives. Proline and derivatives are compounds containing proline or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of proline at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline is a drug which is used in france as a combination product for the treatment of small, superficial wounds. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline is primarily located in the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline is involved in the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway and the oncogenic action OF succinate pathway. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hyperornithinemia with gyrate atrophy (hoga) pathway, the hyperprolinemia type I pathway, the hyperprolinemia type II pathway, and L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline is a potentially toxic compound. trans-4-Hydroxy-L-proline has been found to be associated with several diseases known as hemodialysis and alzheimer's disease; trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including hydroxyprolinemia and iminoglycinuria.
4-Hydroxystyrene ; HMDB0004072 4-Vinylphenol, also known as P-hydroxystyrene, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as styrenes. These are organic compounds containing an ethenylbenzene moiety. 4-Vinylphenol exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4-Vinylphenol exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 4-Vinylphenol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 4-vinylphenol can be biosynthesized from styrene. 4-Vinylphenol can also be converted into 4-vinylphenol sulfate. 4-Vinylphenol is a sweet, almond shell, and chemical tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as corn, beer, highbush blueberry, and tea. This makes 4-vinylphenol a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
4-Hydroxystyrene ; HMDB04072 4-Vinylphenol, also known as P-hydroxystyrene, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as styrenes. These are organic compounds containing an ethenylbenzene moiety. 4-Vinylphenol exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4-Vinylphenol exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 4-Vinylphenol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 4-vinylphenol can be biosynthesized from styrene. 4-Vinylphenol can also be converted into 4-vinylphenol sulfate. 4-Vinylphenol is a sweet, almond shell, and chemical tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as corn, beer, highbush blueberry, and tea. This makes 4-vinylphenol a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
4-Pyridoxic acid ; HMDB0000017 4-Pyridoxic acid, also known as 4-pyridoxate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyridinecarboxylic acids. Pyridinecarboxylic acids are compounds containing a pyridine ring bearing a carboxylic acid group. 4-Pyridoxic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4-Pyridoxic acid has been found in human liver, bladder and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 4-pyridoxic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 4-Pyridoxic acid can be biosynthesized from pyridoxal; which is mediated by the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In humans, 4-pyridoxic acid is involved in the vitamin B6 metabolism pathway. 4-Pyridoxic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the hypophosphatasia pathway.
4-Pyridoxic acid ; HMDB00017 4-Pyridoxic acid, also known as 4-pyridoxate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyridinecarboxylic acids. Pyridinecarboxylic acids are compounds containing a pyridine ring bearing a carboxylic acid group. 4-Pyridoxic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 4-Pyridoxic acid has been found in human liver, bladder and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 4-pyridoxic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 4-Pyridoxic acid can be biosynthesized from pyridoxal; which is mediated by the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In humans, 4-pyridoxic acid is involved in the vitamin B6 metabolism pathway. 4-Pyridoxic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the hypophosphatasia pathway.
4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid ; HMDB0001161 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid, also known as gamma-butyrobetaine or deoxycarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as straight chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with a straight aliphatic chain. 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in urine, feces, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, 4-trimethylammoniobutanoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), adiposome and mitochondria. 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid can be biosynthesized from 4-trimethylammoniobutanal through its interaction with the enzyme 4-trimethylaminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase. In addition, 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into L-carnitine and succinic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme Gamma-butyrobetaine dioxygenase. In humans, 4-trimethylammoniobutanoic acid is involved in carnitine synthesis pathway.
4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid ; HMDB01161 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid, also known as gamma-butyrobetaine or deoxycarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as straight chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with a straight aliphatic chain. 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in urine, feces, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, 4-trimethylammoniobutanoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), adiposome and mitochondria. 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid can be biosynthesized from 4-trimethylammoniobutanal through its interaction with the enzyme 4-trimethylaminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase. In addition, 4-Trimethylammoniobutanoic acid and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into L-carnitine and succinic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme Gamma-butyrobetaine dioxygenase. In humans, 4-trimethylammoniobutanoic acid is involved in carnitine synthesis pathway.
4-Vinylphenol sulfate ; HMDB0062775 4-Vinylphenol sulfate belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylsulfates. Phenylsulfates are compounds containing a sulfuric acid group conjugated to a phenyl group. 4-Vinylphenol sulfate has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. 4-Vinylphenol sulfate can be biosynthesized from 4-hydroxystyrene.
5,6-Dihydrouridine ; HMDB0000497 5,6-Dihydrouridine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycosylamines. Glycosylamines are compounds consisting of an amine with a beta-N-glycosidic bond to a carbohydrate, thus forming a cyclic hemiaminal ether bond (alpha-amino ether). 5,6-Dihydrouridine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5,6-Dihydrouridine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 5,6-dihydrouridine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 5,6-Dihydrouridine can be converted into 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-5,6-dihydrouridine.
5-Acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil ; HMDB0004400 5-Acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil, also known as aamu or 5-ammu, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acetylarylamines. These are acetamides where one or more amide hydrogens is substituted by an aryl group. 5-Acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. In humans, 5-acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway.
5-Acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil ; HMDB04400 5-Acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil, also known as aamu or 5-ammu, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acetylarylamines. These are acetamides where one or more amide hydrogens is substituted by an aryl group. 5-Acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. In humans, 5-acetylamino-6-amino-3-methyluracil is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway.
5-Acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil ; HMDB0011105 5-Acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil, also known as afmu, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxypyrimidines. These are organic compounds containing a hydroxyl group attached to a pyrimidine ring. Pyrimidine is a 6-membered ring consisting of four carbon atoms and two nitrogen centers at the 1- and 3- ring positions. 5-Acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 5-Acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 5-Acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil can be biosynthesized from paraxanthine and acetyl-CoA; which is mediated by the enzyme arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2. In humans, 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway.
5-Aminolevulinic acid ; HMDB0001149 5-Amino-levulinic acid, also known as 5-aminolevulinate or 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as delta amino acids and derivatives. Delta amino acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid group and an amino group at the C5 carbon atom. 5-Amino-levulinic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Amino-levulinic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 5-amino-levulinic acid is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. 5-Amino-levulinic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, 5-amino-levulinic acid is involved in the porphyrin metabolism pathway and the glycine and serine metabolism pathway. 5-Amino-levulinic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency, the acute intermittent porphyria pathway, the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, and the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway. Outside of the human body, 5-amino-levulinic acid can be found in a number of food items such as mamey sapote, sunflower, grapefruit/pummelo hybrid, and burbot. This makes 5-amino-levulinic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. 5-Amino-levulinic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
5-Aminolevulinic acid ; HMDB01149 5-Amino-levulinic acid, also known as 5-aminolevulinate or 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as delta amino acids and derivatives. Delta amino acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid group and an amino group at the C5 carbon atom. 5-Amino-levulinic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Amino-levulinic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 5-amino-levulinic acid is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. 5-Amino-levulinic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, 5-amino-levulinic acid is involved in the porphyrin metabolism pathway and the glycine and serine metabolism pathway. 5-Amino-levulinic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency, the acute intermittent porphyria pathway, the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, and the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway. Outside of the human body, 5-amino-levulinic acid can be found in a number of food items such as mamey sapote, sunflower, grapefruit/pummelo hybrid, and burbot. This makes 5-amino-levulinic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. 5-Amino-levulinic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
5-HEPE ; HMDB0005081 (+/-)-5-hepe belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and five CC double bonds. Thus, (+/-)-5-hepe is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule (+/-)-5-hepe is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule (+/-)-5-hepe has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, (+/-)-5-hepe is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
5-HETE ; HMDB0011134 5S-Hete, also known as 5(S)-hete, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, 5S-hete is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. 5S-Hete is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 5S-Hete has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, 5S-hete is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, 5S-hete is involved in the salicylate-sodium action pathway, the magnesium salicylate action pathway, the valdecoxib action pathway, and the lumiracoxib action pathway. 5S-Hete is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency and the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway.
5-HETE ; HMDB11134 5S-Hete, also known as 5(S)-hete, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, 5S-hete is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. 5S-Hete is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 5S-Hete has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, 5S-hete is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, 5S-hete is involved in the salicylate-sodium action pathway, the magnesium salicylate action pathway, the valdecoxib action pathway, and the lumiracoxib action pathway. 5S-Hete is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency and the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway.
5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan ; HMDB0000472 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan, also known as oxitriptan or levothym, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as serotonins. Serotonins are compounds containing a serotonin moiety, which consists of an indole that bears an aminoethyl a position 2 and a hydroxyl group at position 5. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan is a drug which is used for use as an antidepressant, appetite suppressant, and sleep aid. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan and 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin can be biosynthesized from L-tryptophan and tetrahydrobiopterin; which is mediated by the enzyme tryptophan 5-hydroxylase 1. In addition, 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan can be converted into serotonin through its interaction with the enzyme aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase. In humans, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency.
5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan ; HMDB00472 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan, also known as oxitriptan or levothym, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as serotonins. Serotonins are compounds containing a serotonin moiety, which consists of an indole that bears an aminoethyl a position 2 and a hydroxyl group at position 5. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan is a drug which is used for use as an antidepressant, appetite suppressant, and sleep aid. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan and 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin can be biosynthesized from L-tryptophan and tetrahydrobiopterin; which is mediated by the enzyme tryptophan 5-hydroxylase 1. In addition, 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan can be converted into serotonin through its interaction with the enzyme aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase. In humans, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency.
5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid ; HMDB0000763 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid, also known as 5-hiaa or 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indole-3-acetic acid derivatives. Indole-3-acetic acid derivatives are compounds containing an acetic acid (or a derivative) linked to the C3 carbon atom of an indole. 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid can be biosynthesized from 5-hydroxyindoleacetaldehyde through the action of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In addition, 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid and S-adenosylmethionine can be converted into 5-methoxyindoleacetate and S-adenosylhomocysteine through the action of the enzyme acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase. In humans, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid can be found in a number of food items such as lemon thyme, chicory roots, custard apple, and durian. This makes 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as schizophrenia, hereditary spastic paraplegia, dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport defect, and brunner syndrome; 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency.
5-Hydroxylysine ; HMDB0000450 5-Hydroxylysine, also known as lysine, 5 hydroxy, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. 5-Hydroxylysine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Hydroxylysine has been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 5-hydroxylysine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 5-Hydroxylysine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, 5-hydroxylysine can be found in broad bean and pulses. This makes 5-hydroxylysine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
5-Hydroxylysine ; HMDB00450 5-Hydroxylysine, also known as lysine, 5 hydroxy, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. 5-Hydroxylysine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Hydroxylysine has been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, 5-hydroxylysine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 5-Hydroxylysine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, 5-hydroxylysine can be found in broad bean and pulses. This makes 5-hydroxylysine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
5-Hydroxymethyl-4-methyluracil ; HMDB0000544 5-Hydroxymethyl-4-methyluracil, also known as pentoxyl or 4-methyl-5-hydroxymethyluracil, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrimidones. Pyrimidones are compounds that contain a pyrimidine ring, which bears a ketone. Pyrimidine is a 6-membered ring consisting of four carbon atoms and two nitrogen centers at the 1- and 3- ring positions. 5-Hydroxymethyl-4-methyluracil is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 5-hydroxymethyl-4-methyluracil is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
5-Hydroxymethyl-4-methyluracil ; HMDB00544 5-Hydroxymethyl-4-methyluracil, also known as pentoxyl or 4-methyl-5-hydroxymethyluracil, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrimidones. Pyrimidones are compounds that contain a pyrimidine ring, which bears a ketone. Pyrimidine is a 6-membered ring consisting of four carbon atoms and two nitrogen centers at the 1- and 3- ring positions. 5-Hydroxymethyl-4-methyluracil is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 5-hydroxymethyl-4-methyluracil is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
5-Hydroxytryptophol ; HMDB0001855 5-Hydroxytryptophol, also known as 5-hydroxyindol or 5-htol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyindoles. These are organic compounds containing an indole moiety that carries a hydroxyl group. 5-Hydroxytryptophol is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Hydroxytryptophol has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Outside of the human body, 5-hydroxytryptophol can be found in a number of food items such as yam, cumin, oil-seed camellia, and chia. This makes 5-hydroxytryptophol a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
5-Hydroxytryptophol ; HMDB01855 5-Hydroxytryptophol, also known as 5-hydroxyindol or 5-htol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyindoles. These are organic compounds containing an indole moiety that carries a hydroxyl group. 5-Hydroxytryptophol is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 5-Hydroxytryptophol has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Outside of the human body, 5-hydroxytryptophol can be found in a number of food items such as yam, cumin, oil-seed camellia, and chia. This makes 5-hydroxytryptophol a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
5-Methylthioribose ; HMDB0001087 5-Methylthioribose belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pentoses. These are monosaccharides in which the carbohydrate moiety contains five carbon atoms. 5-Methylthioribose is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, 5-methylthioribose is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, 5-methylthioribose can be found in a number of food items such as hedge mustard, atlantic herring, cucurbita (gourd), and burdock. This makes 5-methylthioribose a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
5alpha-Androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol disulfate ; HMDB0094682 5alpha-Androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol disulfate, also known as 5a-androstan-3a,17b-diol disulfuric acid or 5-androstane-3,17s-diol disulphate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sulfated steroids. These are sterol lipids containing a sulfate group attached to the steroid skeleton. 5alpha-Androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol disulfate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 5alpha-Androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol disulfate has been found in human hepatic tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, 5alpha-androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol disulfate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 5alpha-Androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol disulfate can be biosynthesized from 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol.
5alpha-pregnan-3beta,20alpha-diol disulfate ; HMDB0094650 5alpha-Pregnan-3beta,20alpha-diol disulfate, also known as 5a-pregnan-3b,20a-diol disulfuric acid or 5-pregnan-3s,20-diol disulfate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 2,4,5-trisubstituted thiazoles. 2,4,5-trisubstituted thiazoles are compounds containing a thiazole ring substituted at positions 2, 4 and 5 only. 5alpha-Pregnan-3beta,20alpha-diol disulfate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 5alpha-Pregnan-3beta,20alpha-diol disulfate has been primarily detected in feces.
5Z-Dodecenoic acid ; HMDB0000529 Lauroleinic acid, also known as 5-dodecenoate or 5-dodecenoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Lauroleinic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lauroleinic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, lauroleinic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome.
5Z-Dodecenoic acid ; HMDB00529 Lauroleinic acid, also known as 5-dodecenoate or 5-dodecenoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Lauroleinic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lauroleinic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, lauroleinic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome.
6,8-Dihydroxypurine ; HMDB0001182 6,8-Dihydroxypurine, also known as 6,8-purinediol or 8-oxohypoxanthine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hypoxanthines. Hypoxanthines are compounds containing the purine derivative 1H-purin-6(9H)-one. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. 6,8-Dihydroxypurine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
6,8-Dihydroxypurine ; HMDB01182 6,8-Dihydroxypurine, also known as 6,8-purinediol or 8-oxohypoxanthine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hypoxanthines. Hypoxanthines are compounds containing the purine derivative 1H-purin-6(9H)-one. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. 6,8-Dihydroxypurine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
6-Oxopiperidine-2-carboxylic acid ; HMDB0061705 6-Oxopiperidine-2-carboxylic acid, also known as adipo-2,6-lactam or cyclic alpha-aminoadipic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon), or a derivative thereof. 6-Oxopiperidine-2-carboxylic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
7-Ketodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB0000391 , also known as 7-oxodeoxycholate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Thus, is considered to be a bile acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
7-Ketodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB00391 , also known as 7-oxodeoxycholate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Thus, is considered to be a bile acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
7-Methylguanine ; HMDB0000897 7-Methylguanine, also known as n7-me-G, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hypoxanthines. Hypoxanthines are compounds containing the purine derivative 1H-purin-6(9H)-one. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. 7-Methylguanine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 7-Methylguanine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, 7-methylguanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 7-Methylguanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
7-Methylguanine ; HMDB00897 7-Methylguanine, also known as n7-me-G, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hypoxanthines. Hypoxanthines are compounds containing the purine derivative 1H-purin-6(9H)-one. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. 7-Methylguanine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 7-Methylguanine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, 7-methylguanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. 7-Methylguanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
7alpha-Hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholestenoate ; HMDB0012458 7alpha-Hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholestenoate, also known as 7-hoca or (7)-7-hydroxy-3-oxocholest-4-en-26-Oate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as monohydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are bile acids, alcohols or any of their derivatives bearing a hydroxyl group. 7alpha-Hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholestenoate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 7alpha-Hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholestenoate has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 7alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholestenoate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, 7alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholestenoate is involved in congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, and the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway. 7alpha-Hydroxy-3-oxo-4-cholestenoate is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the zellweger syndrome pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway.
8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic acid ; HMDB0002925 Bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid, also known as (Z,Z,Z)-8,11,14-icosatrienoate or 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid has been found in human adipose tissue and epidermis tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. In humans, bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway.
8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic acid ; HMDB02925 Bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid, also known as (Z,Z,Z)-8,11,14-icosatrienoate or 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid has been found in human adipose tissue and epidermis tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. In humans, bishomo-gamma-linolenic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway.
8-HETE ; HMDB0004679 8S-Hete belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, 8S-hete is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. 8S-Hete is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 8S-Hete has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, 8S-hete is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, 8S-hete is involved in the trisalicylate-choline action pathway, the bromfenac action pathway, the rofecoxib action pathway, and the acetylsalicylic Acid action pathway. 8S-Hete is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway and leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency.
8-HETE ; HMDB04679 8S-Hete belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. These are eicosanoic acids with an attached hydroxyl group and four CC double bonds. Thus, 8S-hete is considered to be an eicosanoid lipid molecule. 8S-Hete is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 8S-Hete has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, 8S-hete is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, 8S-hete is involved in the trisalicylate-choline action pathway, the bromfenac action pathway, the rofecoxib action pathway, and the acetylsalicylic Acid action pathway. 8S-Hete is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway and leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency.
9,10-DHOME ; HMDB0004704 9,10-Dihome, also known as 9,10-dhoa or leukotoxin diol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, 9,10-dihome is considered to be an octadecanoid lipid molecule. 9,10-Dihome is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 9,10-Dihome has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, 9,10-dihome is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
9,10-DHOME ; HMDB04704 9,10-Dihome, also known as 9,10-dhoa or leukotoxin diol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, 9,10-dihome is considered to be an octadecanoid lipid molecule. 9,10-Dihome is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 9,10-Dihome has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, 9,10-dihome is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
9-cis-Retinoic acid ; HMDB0002369 9-cis-Retinoic acid, also known as alitretinoin or panretin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as retinoids. These are oxygenated derivatives of 3,7-dimethyl-1-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-enyl)nona-1,3,5,7-tetraene and derivatives thereof. 9-cis-Retinoic acid is a drug which is used for topical treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with aids-related kaposi's sarcoma. 9-cis-Retinoic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. 9-cis-Retinoic acid has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, 9-cis-retinoic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 9-cis-Retinoic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 9-cis-Retinoic acid can be biosynthesized from 9-cis-retinal through the action of the enzyme retinal dehydrogenase 1. In addition, 9-cis-Retinoic acid can be biosynthesized from 9-cis-retinal; which is mediated by the enzyme retinal dehydrogenase 2. In humans, 9-cis-retinoic acid is involved in the retinol metabolism pathway. 9-cis-Retinoic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called vitamin a deficiency.
9-cis-Retinoic acid ; HMDB02369 9-cis-Retinoic acid, also known as alitretinoin or panretin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as retinoids. These are oxygenated derivatives of 3,7-dimethyl-1-(2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-enyl)nona-1,3,5,7-tetraene and derivatives thereof. 9-cis-Retinoic acid is a drug which is used for topical treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with aids-related kaposi's sarcoma. 9-cis-Retinoic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. 9-cis-Retinoic acid has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, 9-cis-retinoic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 9-cis-Retinoic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 9-cis-Retinoic acid can be biosynthesized from 9-cis-retinal through the action of the enzyme retinal dehydrogenase 1. In addition, 9-cis-Retinoic acid can be biosynthesized from 9-cis-retinal; which is mediated by the enzyme retinal dehydrogenase 2. In humans, 9-cis-retinoic acid is involved in the retinol metabolism pathway. 9-cis-Retinoic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called vitamin a deficiency.
Acesulfame ; HMDB0033585 Acesulfame, also known as acesulphamo or acesulfame sodium, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as organic sulfuric acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing the sulfuric acid or a derivative thereof. Acesulfame exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, acesulfame is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acesulfame has a bitter taste.
Acesulfame ; HMDB33585 Acesulfame, also known as acesulphamo or acesulfame sodium, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as organic sulfuric acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing the sulfuric acid or a derivative thereof. Acesulfame exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, acesulfame is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acesulfame has a bitter taste.
Acetaminophen ; HMDB0001859 Acetaminophen, also known as paracetamol or apap, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-hydroxy-2-unsubstituted benzenoids. These are phenols that are unsubstituted at the 2-position. Acetaminophen is a drug which is used for temporary relief of fever, minor aches, and pains. Acetaminophen exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Acetaminophen has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, feces, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, acetaminophen is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acetaminophen participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Acetaminophen can be converted into NAPQI through the action of the enzymes cytochrome P450 2E1, cytochrome P450 1A2, cytochrome P450 2D6, cytochrome P450 3A4, and cytochrome P450 2A6. In addition, Acetaminophen and uridine diphosphate glucuronic acid can be converted into acetaminophen glucuronide and uridine 5'-diphosphate through the action of the enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-9, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B15, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-1, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-6. In humans, acetaminophen is involved in the acetaminophen metabolism pathway and the acetaminophen action pathway. Acetaminophen has a bitter taste. Acetaminophen is a potentially toxic compound.
Acetaminophen ; HMDB01859 Acetaminophen, also known as paracetamol or apap, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-hydroxy-2-unsubstituted benzenoids. These are phenols that are unsubstituted at the 2-position. Acetaminophen is a drug which is used for temporary relief of fever, minor aches, and pains. Acetaminophen exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Acetaminophen has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, feces, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, acetaminophen is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acetaminophen participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Acetaminophen can be converted into NAPQI through the action of the enzymes cytochrome P450 2E1, cytochrome P450 1A2, cytochrome P450 2D6, cytochrome P450 3A4, and cytochrome P450 2A6. In addition, Acetaminophen and uridine diphosphate glucuronic acid can be converted into acetaminophen glucuronide and uridine 5'-diphosphate through the action of the enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-9, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B15, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-1, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-6. In humans, acetaminophen is involved in the acetaminophen metabolism pathway and the acetaminophen action pathway. Acetaminophen has a bitter taste. Acetaminophen is a potentially toxic compound.
Acetaminophen glucuronide ; HMDB0010316 Acetaminophen glucuronide, also known as 4-glucuronosidoacetanilide or deethylphenacetin glucuronide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenolic glycosides. These are organic compounds containing a phenolic structure attached to a glycosyl moiety. Some examples of phenolic structures include lignans, and flavonoids. Among the sugar units found in natural glycosides are D-glucose, L-Fructose, and L rhamnose. Acetaminophen glucuronide is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Acetaminophen glucuronide has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, acetaminophen glucuronide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acetaminophen glucuronide participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Acetaminophen glucuronide and uridine 5'-diphosphate can be biosynthesized from acetaminophen and uridine diphosphate glucuronic acid; which is mediated by the enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-9, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B15, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-1, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-6. In addition, Acetaminophen glucuronide can be converted into acetaminophen glucuronide; which is catalyzed by the enzyme ATP-binding cassette sub-family g member 2. In humans, acetaminophen glucuronide is involved in the acetaminophen metabolism pathway. Acetaminophen glucuronide has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including beta-thalassemia.
Acetaminophen glucuronide ; HMDB10316 Acetaminophen glucuronide, also known as 4-glucuronosidoacetanilide or deethylphenacetin glucuronide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenolic glycosides. These are organic compounds containing a phenolic structure attached to a glycosyl moiety. Some examples of phenolic structures include lignans, and flavonoids. Among the sugar units found in natural glycosides are D-glucose, L-Fructose, and L rhamnose. Acetaminophen glucuronide is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Acetaminophen glucuronide has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, acetaminophen glucuronide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acetaminophen glucuronide participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Acetaminophen glucuronide and uridine 5'-diphosphate can be biosynthesized from acetaminophen and uridine diphosphate glucuronic acid; which is mediated by the enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-9, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B15, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-1, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1-6. In addition, Acetaminophen glucuronide can be converted into acetaminophen glucuronide; which is catalyzed by the enzyme ATP-binding cassette sub-family g member 2. In humans, acetaminophen glucuronide is involved in the acetaminophen metabolism pathway. Acetaminophen glucuronide has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including beta-thalassemia.
Acetoacetic acid ; HMDB0000060 Acetoacetic acid, also known as 3-oxobutanoic acid or 3-oxobutyrate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain keto acids and derivatives. These are keto acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. Acetoacetic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Acetoacetic acid has been found in human liver and spleen tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and feces. Within the cell, acetoacetic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and peroxisome. Acetoacetic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Acetoacetic acid and succinyl-CoA can be converted into succinic acid through the action of the enzyme succinyl-coa:3-ketoacid coenzyme A transferase 1, mitochondrial. In humans, acetoacetic acid is involved in the butyrate metabolism pathway, the disulfiram action pathway, fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, and the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway. Acetoacetic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III pathway, dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the propionic acidemia pathway, and 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency type I. Acetoacetic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as ketosis, pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase deficiency, anoxia, and schizophrenia; acetoacetic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome.
Acetylcarnosine ; HMDB0012881 Acetylcarnosine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hybrid peptides. Hybrid peptides are compounds containing at least two different types of amino acids (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) linked to each other through a peptide bond. Acetylcarnosine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
Acetylcarnosine ; HMDB12881 Acetylcarnosine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hybrid peptides. Hybrid peptides are compounds containing at least two different types of amino acids (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) linked to each other through a peptide bond. Acetylcarnosine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
Acetylcholine ; HMDB0000895 Acetylcholine , also known as ACh or choline acetate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl cholines. These are acylated derivatives of choline. Choline or 2-Hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium is a quaternary ammonium salt with the chemical formula (CH3)3N+(CH2)2OH. Acetylcholine is a drug which is used to obtain miosis of the iris in seconds after delivery of the lens in cataract surgery, in penetrating keratoplasty, iridectomy and other anterior segment surgery where rapid miosis may be required. Acetylcholine exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Acetylcholine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, acetylcholine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, nucleus, myelin sheath and mitochondria. In humans, acetylcholine is involved in phospholipid biosynthesis pathway, the lafutidine H2-antihistamine action pathway, the cimetidine action pathway, and the omeprazole action pathway. Acetylcholine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the metiamide action pathway. Outside of the human body, acetylcholine can be found in a number of food items such as red bell pepper, potato, carrot, and green bell pepper. This makes acetylcholine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Acetylcholine ; HMDB00895 Acetylcholine , also known as ACh or choline acetate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl cholines. These are acylated derivatives of choline. Choline or 2-Hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium is a quaternary ammonium salt with the chemical formula (CH3)3N+(CH2)2OH. Acetylcholine is a drug which is used to obtain miosis of the iris in seconds after delivery of the lens in cataract surgery, in penetrating keratoplasty, iridectomy and other anterior segment surgery where rapid miosis may be required. Acetylcholine exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Acetylcholine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, acetylcholine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, nucleus, myelin sheath and mitochondria. In humans, acetylcholine is involved in phospholipid biosynthesis pathway, the lafutidine H2-antihistamine action pathway, the cimetidine action pathway, and the omeprazole action pathway. Acetylcholine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the metiamide action pathway. Outside of the human body, acetylcholine can be found in a number of food items such as red bell pepper, potato, carrot, and green bell pepper. This makes acetylcholine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Acetylglycine ; HMDB0000532 Acetylglycine, also known as acetamidoacetate or aceturic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. Acetylglycine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Acetylglycine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, urine, and blood. Within the cell, acetylglycine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acetylglycine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including aminoacylase I deficiency.
Acetylhomoserine ; HMDB0029423 Acetylhomoserine, also known as homoserine acetate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Acetylhomoserine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, acetylhomoserine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acetylhomoserine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Acetylhomoserine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Acetylhomoserine can be biosynthesized from L-homoserine and acetyl-CoA through its interaction with the enzyme homoserine O-trans-acetylase. Furthermore, Acetylhomoserine and hydrogen sulfide can be converted into acetic acid and homocysteine through the action of the enzyme O-acetylhomoserine (thiol)-lyase. Furthermore, Acetylhomoserine and hydrogen sulfide can be converted into acetic acid and homocysteine through its interaction with the enzyme O-acetylhomoserine (thiol)-lyase. Furthermore, Acetylhomoserine can be biosynthesized from L-homoserine and acetyl-CoA; which is mediated by the enzyme homoserine O-trans-acetylase. Finally, Selenocysteine and acetylhomoserine can be converted into selenocystathionine and acetic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme cystathionine gamma-synthase. Outside of the human body, acetylhomoserine can be found in common pea and pulses. This makes acetylhomoserine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Adenine ; HMDB0000034 Adenine, also known as 6-aminopurine or Ade, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 6-aminopurines. These are purines that carry an amino group at position 6. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. Adenine is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Adenine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adenine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and urine. Within the cell, adenine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, nucleus and lysosome. Adenine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Adenine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Adenine and ribose 1-phosphate can be biosynthesized from adenosine through the action of the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In addition, Adenine and deoxyribose 1-phosphate can be biosynthesized from deoxyadenosine; which is mediated by the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In humans, adenine is involved in the azathioprine action pathway, the purine metabolism pathway, the thioguanine action pathway, and the mercaptopurine action pathway. Adenine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency (aprt), molybdenum cofactor deficiency, the lesch-nyhan syndrome (LNS) pathway, and xanthine dehydrogenase deficiency (xanthinuria). Adenine is a potentially toxic compound.
Adenosine ; HMDB0000050 Adenosine, also known as adenocard or ade-rib, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. Adenosine is a drug which is used as an initial treatment for the termination of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (pvst), including that associated with accessory bypass tracts, and is a drug of choice for terminating stable, narrow-complex supraventricular tachycardias (svt). also used as an adjunct to thallous chloride ti 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (thallium stress test) in patients who are unable to exercise adequately, as well as an adjunct to vagal maneuvers and clinical assessment to establish a specific diagnosis of undefined, stable, narrow-complex svt. Adenosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adenosine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, feces, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. Within the cell, adenosine is primarily located in the mitochondria and lysosome. Adenosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Adenosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Adenosine can be converted into inosine through its interaction with the enzyme adenosine deaminase. In addition, Adenosine can be converted into adenine and ribose 1-phosphate through its interaction with the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In humans, adenosine is involved in the thioguanine action pathway, the azathioprine action pathway, the methionine metabolism pathway, and the mercaptopurine action pathway. Adenosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency, the hypermethioninemia pathway, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency (aprt), and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Adenosine is a potentially toxic compound.
Adenosine ; HMDB00050 Adenosine, also known as adenocard or ade-rib, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. Adenosine is a drug which is used as an initial treatment for the termination of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (pvst), including that associated with accessory bypass tracts, and is a drug of choice for terminating stable, narrow-complex supraventricular tachycardias (svt). also used as an adjunct to thallous chloride ti 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (thallium stress test) in patients who are unable to exercise adequately, as well as an adjunct to vagal maneuvers and clinical assessment to establish a specific diagnosis of undefined, stable, narrow-complex svt. Adenosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adenosine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, feces, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. Within the cell, adenosine is primarily located in the mitochondria and lysosome. Adenosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Adenosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Adenosine can be converted into inosine through its interaction with the enzyme adenosine deaminase. In addition, Adenosine can be converted into adenine and ribose 1-phosphate through its interaction with the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In humans, adenosine is involved in the thioguanine action pathway, the azathioprine action pathway, the methionine metabolism pathway, and the mercaptopurine action pathway. Adenosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency, the hypermethioninemia pathway, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency (aprt), and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Adenosine is a potentially toxic compound.
Adenosine monophosphate ; HMDB0000045 Adenosine monophosphate, also known as adenylic acid or AMP, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine ribonucleoside monophosphates. These are nucleotides consisting of a purine base linked to a ribose to which one monophosphate group is attached. Adenosine monophosphate is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Adenosine monophosphate exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adenosine monophosphate has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, saliva, and cerebrospinal fluid. Adenosine monophosphate can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome, and peroxisome. Adenosine monophosphate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Adenosine monophosphate can be biosynthesized from L-serine through its interaction with the enzyme serine--trna ligase, cytoplasmic. In humans, adenosine monophosphate is involved in the delavirdine action pathway, the spectinomycin action pathway, the mercaptopurine action pathway, and the propanoate metabolism pathway. Adenosine monophosphate is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include transaldolase deficiency, 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency, the hyperprolinemia type II pathway, and creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency. Outside of the human body, adenosine monophosphate can be found in a number of food items such as elliott's blueberry, conch, nanking cherry, and jackfruit. This makes adenosine monophosphate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Adenosine monophosphate ; HMDB00045 Adenosine monophosphate, also known as adenylic acid or AMP, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine ribonucleoside monophosphates. These are nucleotides consisting of a purine base linked to a ribose to which one monophosphate group is attached. Adenosine monophosphate is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Adenosine monophosphate exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adenosine monophosphate has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, saliva, and cerebrospinal fluid. Adenosine monophosphate can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome, and peroxisome. Adenosine monophosphate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Adenosine monophosphate can be biosynthesized from L-serine through its interaction with the enzyme serine--trna ligase, cytoplasmic. In humans, adenosine monophosphate is involved in the delavirdine action pathway, the spectinomycin action pathway, the mercaptopurine action pathway, and the propanoate metabolism pathway. Adenosine monophosphate is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include transaldolase deficiency, 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency, the hyperprolinemia type II pathway, and creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency. Outside of the human body, adenosine monophosphate can be found in a number of food items such as elliott's blueberry, conch, nanking cherry, and jackfruit. This makes adenosine monophosphate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Adenosine triphosphate ; HMDB0000538 Adenosine triphosphate, also known as ATP or atriphos, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine ribonucleoside triphosphates. These are purine ribobucleotides with a triphosphate group linked to the ribose moiety. Adenosine triphosphate is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Adenosine triphosphate is slightly soluble (in water) and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adenosine triphosphate has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Adenosine triphosphate can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in peroxisome, nucleus, mitochondria, and cytoplasm. Adenosine triphosphate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, adenosine triphosphate is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(22:0/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway, phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(22:2(13Z,16Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway, phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(24:1(15Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)) pathway, and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(9D3/13d5) pathway. Adenosine triphosphate is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the primary hyperoxaluria II, PH2 pathway, the fanconi-bickel syndrome pathway, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III pathway, and the transfer OF acetyl groups into mitochondria pathway. Outside of the human body, adenosine triphosphate can be found in a number of food items such as watermelon, napa cabbage, broad bean, and flaxseed. This makes adenosine triphosphate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Adenosine triphosphate is a potentially toxic compound.
Adenosine triphosphate ; HMDB00538 Adenosine triphosphate, also known as ATP or atriphos, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine ribonucleoside triphosphates. These are purine ribobucleotides with a triphosphate group linked to the ribose moiety. Adenosine triphosphate is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Adenosine triphosphate is slightly soluble (in water) and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adenosine triphosphate has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Adenosine triphosphate can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in peroxisome, nucleus, mitochondria, and cytoplasm. Adenosine triphosphate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, adenosine triphosphate is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(22:0/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway, phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(22:2(13Z,16Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway, phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(24:1(15Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)) pathway, and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(9D3/13d5) pathway. Adenosine triphosphate is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the primary hyperoxaluria II, PH2 pathway, the fanconi-bickel syndrome pathway, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III pathway, and the transfer OF acetyl groups into mitochondria pathway. Outside of the human body, adenosine triphosphate can be found in a number of food items such as watermelon, napa cabbage, broad bean, and flaxseed. This makes adenosine triphosphate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Adenosine triphosphate is a potentially toxic compound.
Adipic acid ; HMDB0000448 Adipic acid, also known as adipate or hexanedioate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Adipic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adipic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, saliva, urine, and feces. Within the cell, adipic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Adipic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 3-methyladipic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, and 3-aminoadipic acid. Adipic acid is an odorless tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as root vegetables, fats and oils, common beet, and fruits. This makes adipic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Adipic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase deficiency, 3-hydroxydicarboxylic aciduria, and anorexia nervosa; adipic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency.
Adipic acid ; HMDB00448 Adipic acid, also known as adipate or hexanedioate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Adipic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adipic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, saliva, urine, and feces. Within the cell, adipic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Adipic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 3-methyladipic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, and 3-aminoadipic acid. Adipic acid is an odorless tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as root vegetables, fats and oils, common beet, and fruits. This makes adipic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Adipic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase deficiency, 3-hydroxydicarboxylic aciduria, and anorexia nervosa; adipic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency.
ADP ; HMDB0001341 Adp, also known as H3ADP or magnesium ADP, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine ribonucleoside diphosphates. These are purine ribobucleotides with diphosphate group linked to the ribose moiety. Adp is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adp has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Adp can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in cytoplasm, nucleus, mitochondria, and peroxisome. Adp exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, Adp is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/16:0) pathway, phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(22:0/22:2(13Z,16Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(11Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway, and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(11D3/11m5) pathway. Adp is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (e2), xanthine dehydrogenase deficiency (xanthinuria), and the congenital disorder OF glycosylation CDG-iid pathway.
ADP ; HMDB01341 Adp, also known as H3ADP or magnesium ADP, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine ribonucleoside diphosphates. These are purine ribobucleotides with diphosphate group linked to the ribose moiety. Adp is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Adp has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Adp can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in cytoplasm, nucleus, mitochondria, and peroxisome. Adp exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, Adp is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/16:0) pathway, phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(22:0/22:2(13Z,16Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(11Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway, and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(11D3/11m5) pathway. Adp is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (e2), xanthine dehydrogenase deficiency (xanthinuria), and the congenital disorder OF glycosylation CDG-iid pathway.
Adrenic acid ; HMDB0002226 Adrenic acid, also known as adrenate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Adrenic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Adrenic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Adrenic acid can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in cytoplasm, adiposome, peroxisome, and myelin sheath. Adrenic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Adrenic acid can be biosynthesized from arachidonic acid through its interaction with the enzyme elongation OF very long chain fatty acids protein 5. In addition, Adrenic acid can be converted into tetracosatetraenoic acid (24:4N-6); which is mediated by the enzyme elongation OF very long chain fatty acids protein 4. In humans, adrenic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway.
Adrenic acid ; HMDB02226 Adrenic acid, also known as adrenate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Adrenic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Adrenic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Adrenic acid can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in cytoplasm, adiposome, peroxisome, and myelin sheath. Adrenic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Adrenic acid can be biosynthesized from arachidonic acid through its interaction with the enzyme elongation OF very long chain fatty acids protein 5. In addition, Adrenic acid can be converted into tetracosatetraenoic acid (24:4N-6); which is mediated by the enzyme elongation OF very long chain fatty acids protein 4. In humans, adrenic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway.
Allantoin ; HMDB0000462 Allantoin, also known as glyoxyldiureide or 5-ureidohydantoin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazoles. Imidazoles are compounds containing an imidazole ring, which is an aromatic five-member ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3, and three carbon atoms. Allantoin exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Allantoin has been detected in most biofluids, including urine, feces, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, allantoin is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Allantoin exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Allantoin can be biosynthesized from hydantoin. Outside of the human body, allantoin can be found in a number of food items such as rowal, lotus, pasta, and date. This makes allantoin a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Allantoin is a potentially toxic compound.
Allantoin ; HMDB00462 Allantoin, also known as glyoxyldiureide or 5-ureidohydantoin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazoles. Imidazoles are compounds containing an imidazole ring, which is an aromatic five-member ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3, and three carbon atoms. Allantoin exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Allantoin has been detected in most biofluids, including urine, feces, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, allantoin is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Allantoin exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Allantoin can be biosynthesized from hydantoin. Outside of the human body, allantoin can be found in a number of food items such as rowal, lotus, pasta, and date. This makes allantoin a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Allantoin is a potentially toxic compound.
Allocholic acid ; HMDB0000505 Cholic acid, also known as cholate or cholsaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as trihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are prenol lipids structurally characterized by a bile acid or alcohol which bears three hydroxyl groups. Cholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, cholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Cholic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and cholic acid can be converted into chenodeoxycholic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme bile acyl-CoA synthetase. In addition, Cholic acid can be biosynthesized from choloyl-CoA; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acyl-CoA synthetase. In humans, cholic acid is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Cholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the zellweger syndrome pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway. Outside of the human body, cholic acid can be found in a number of food items such as ginkgo nuts, celeriac, lotus, and small-leaf linden. This makes cholic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Cholic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Allopurinol ; HMDB0014581 Allopurinol, also known as zyloprim or milurit, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines. These are aromatic heterocyclic compounds containing a pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine ring system, which consists of a pyrazole ring fused to but and not sharing a nitrogen atom with a pyrimidine ring. Allopurinol is a drug which is used for the treatment of hyperuricemia associated with primary or secondary gout. also indicated for the treatment of primary or secondary uric acid nephropathy, with or without the symptoms of gout, as well as chemotherapy-induced hyperuricemia and recurrent renal calculi. Allopurinol exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Allopurinol has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, allopurinol is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Allopurinol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, allopurinol can be biosynthesized from 1H-pyrazolo[4,3-D]pyrimidine. Allopurinol can also be converted into allopurinol riboside. Allopurinol is a potentially toxic compound.
Allopurinol ; HMDB14581 Allopurinol, also known as zyloprim or milurit, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines. These are aromatic heterocyclic compounds containing a pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine ring system, which consists of a pyrazole ring fused to but and not sharing a nitrogen atom with a pyrimidine ring. Allopurinol is a drug which is used for the treatment of hyperuricemia associated with primary or secondary gout. also indicated for the treatment of primary or secondary uric acid nephropathy, with or without the symptoms of gout, as well as chemotherapy-induced hyperuricemia and recurrent renal calculi. Allopurinol exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Allopurinol has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, allopurinol is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Allopurinol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, allopurinol can be biosynthesized from 1H-pyrazolo[4,3-D]pyrimidine. Allopurinol can also be converted into allopurinol riboside. Allopurinol is a potentially toxic compound.
Allopurinol riboside ; HMDB0000481 Allopurinol riboside belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine glycosides. These are nucleosides or derivatives thereof that consist of a pyazolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine ring system that is N-glycosidically linked to a ribose or deoxyribose. They bear the sugar moiety on the pyrimidine part of the molecule. Allopurinol riboside is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Allopurinol riboside has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, allopurinol riboside is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Allopurinol riboside can be converted into allopurinol.
Allopurinol riboside ; HMDB00481 Allopurinol riboside belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine glycosides. These are nucleosides or derivatives thereof that consist of a pyazolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine ring system that is N-glycosidically linked to a ribose or deoxyribose. They bear the sugar moiety on the pyrimidine part of the molecule. Allopurinol riboside is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Allopurinol riboside has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, allopurinol riboside is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Allopurinol riboside can be converted into allopurinol.
alpha-CEHC ; HMDB0001518 Alpha-Cehc, also known as A-cehc, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-benzopyrans. These are organic aromatic compounds that 1-benzopyran, a bicyclic compound made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyran, so that the oxygen atom is at the 1-position. Alpha-Cehc is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Alpha-Cehc has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, Alpha-cehc is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
alpha-CEHC ; HMDB01518 Alpha-Cehc, also known as A-cehc, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-benzopyrans. These are organic aromatic compounds that 1-benzopyran, a bicyclic compound made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyran, so that the oxygen atom is at the 1-position. Alpha-Cehc is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Alpha-Cehc has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, Alpha-cehc is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
alpha-Ketoisovaleric acid ; HMDB0000019 , also known as alpha-ketovaline or 2-oxoisovalerate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain keto acids and derivatives. These are keto acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been detected in most biofluids, including feces, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, is involved in the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway. is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I pathway, 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency type I, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV pathway, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency. Outside of the human body, can be found in a number of food items such as mung bean, poppy, pistachio, and garden onion. This makes a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. is a potentially toxic compound.
alpha-Ketoisovaleric acid ; HMDB00019 , also known as alpha-ketovaline or 2-oxoisovalerate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain keto acids and derivatives. These are keto acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been detected in most biofluids, including feces, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, is involved in the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway. is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I pathway, 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency type I, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV pathway, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency. Outside of the human body, can be found in a number of food items such as mung bean, poppy, pistachio, and garden onion. This makes a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. is a potentially toxic compound.
Alpha-Lactose ; HMDB0000186 Alpha-Lactose, also known as anhydrous lactose or tablettose, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as o-glycosyl compounds. These are glycoside in which a sugar group is bonded through one carbon to another group via a O-glycosidic bond. Alpha-Lactose exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Alpha-Lactose has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and breast milk. Within the cell, Alpha-lactose is primarily located in the cytoplasm, lysosome and golgi. Alpha-Lactose participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Uridine 5'-diphosphate and Alpha-lactose can be biosynthesized from D-glucose and uridine diphosphategalactose through its interaction with the enzyme lactose synthase. In addition, Alpha-Lactose can be converted into melibiose and D-galactose through its interaction with the enzyme Alpha-galactosidase a. In humans, Alpha-lactose is involved in the lactose degradation pathway, the galactose metabolism pathway, lactose synthesis pathway, and the lactose intolerance pathway. Alpha-Lactose is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include glut-1 deficiency syndrome, the congenital disorder OF glycosylation CDG-iid pathway, and the galactosemia pathway. Outside of the human body, Alpha-lactose can be found in cow milk. This makes Alpha-lactose a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Alpha-Linolenic acid ; HMDB0001388 Alpha-Linolenic acid, also known as linolenate or ALA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Alpha-Linolenic acid is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation and for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Alpha-Linolenic acid exists as a liquid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Alpha-Linolenic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, Alpha-linolenic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and membrane (predicted from logP). Alpha-Linolenic acid can be converted into stearidonic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid desaturase 2. In humans, Alpha-linolenic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, Alpha-linolenic acid can be found in a number of food items such as rubus (blackberry, raspberry), bitter gourd, sparkleberry, and romaine lettuce. This makes Alpha-linolenic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Alpha-Linolenic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Alpha-Linolenic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as thyroid cancer, essential hypertension, and hypertension; alpha-linolenic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Alpha-Linolenic acid ; HMDB01388 Alpha-Linolenic acid, also known as linolenate or ALA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Alpha-Linolenic acid is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation and for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Alpha-Linolenic acid exists as a liquid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Alpha-Linolenic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, Alpha-linolenic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and membrane (predicted from logP). Alpha-Linolenic acid can be converted into stearidonic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid desaturase 2. In humans, Alpha-linolenic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, Alpha-linolenic acid can be found in a number of food items such as rubus (blackberry, raspberry), bitter gourd, sparkleberry, and romaine lettuce. This makes Alpha-linolenic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Alpha-Linolenic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Alpha-Linolenic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as thyroid cancer, essential hypertension, and hypertension; alpha-linolenic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Alpha-Muricholic acid ; HMDB0000506 Alpha-Muricholic acid, also known as A-muricholate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as trihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are prenol lipids structurally characterized by a bile acid or alcohol which bears three hydroxyl groups. Alpha-Muricholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Alpha-Muricholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, Alpha-muricholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
Alpha-Muricholic acid ; HMDB00506 Alpha-Muricholic acid, also known as A-muricholate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as trihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are prenol lipids structurally characterized by a bile acid or alcohol which bears three hydroxyl groups. Alpha-Muricholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Alpha-Muricholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, Alpha-muricholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
alpha-Tocopherol ; HMDB0001893 Alpha-Tocopherol, also known as vitamin e or D-tocopherol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tocopherols. These are vitamin E derivatives containing a saturated trimethyltridecyl chain attached to the carbon C6 atom of a benzopyran ring system. The differ from tocotrienols that contain an unsaturated trimethyltrideca-3,7,11-trien-1-yl chain. Thus, Alpha-tocopherol is considered to be a quinone lipid molecule. Alpha-Tocopherol exists as a liquid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Alpha-Tocopherol has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, breast milk, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, Alpha-tocopherol is primarily located in the cytoplasm and membrane (predicted from logP). Alpha-Tocopherol can be converted into 13-hydroxy-alpha-tocopherol. Outside of the human body, Alpha-tocopherol can be found in a number of food items such as red bell pepper, sea-buckthornberry, capers, and carrot. This makes Alpha-tocopherol a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Alpha-Tocopherol is a potentially toxic compound. Alpha-Tocopherol has been found to be associated with several diseases known as thyroid cancer, vitamin e deficiency, parkinson's disease, and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis; alpha-tocopherol has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including abetalipoproteinemia.
alpha-Tocopherol ; HMDB01893 Alpha-Tocopherol, also known as vitamin e or D-tocopherol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tocopherols. These are vitamin E derivatives containing a saturated trimethyltridecyl chain attached to the carbon C6 atom of a benzopyran ring system. The differ from tocotrienols that contain an unsaturated trimethyltrideca-3,7,11-trien-1-yl chain. Thus, Alpha-tocopherol is considered to be a quinone lipid molecule. Alpha-Tocopherol exists as a liquid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Alpha-Tocopherol has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, breast milk, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, Alpha-tocopherol is primarily located in the cytoplasm and membrane (predicted from logP). Alpha-Tocopherol can be converted into 13-hydroxy-alpha-tocopherol. Outside of the human body, Alpha-tocopherol can be found in a number of food items such as red bell pepper, sea-buckthornberry, capers, and carrot. This makes Alpha-tocopherol a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Alpha-Tocopherol is a potentially toxic compound. Alpha-Tocopherol has been found to be associated with several diseases known as thyroid cancer, vitamin e deficiency, parkinson's disease, and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis; alpha-tocopherol has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including abetalipoproteinemia.
Aminoadipic acid ; HMDB0000510 Aminoadipic acid, also known as a-aminoadipate or Aad, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Aminoadipic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Aminoadipic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, aminoadipic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Aminoadipic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Aminoadipic acid can be biosynthesized from allysine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme Alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. In addition, Aminoadipic acid and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into oxoadipic acid and L-glutamic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme kynurenine/alpha-aminoadipate aminotransferase, mitochondrial. In humans, aminoadipic acid is involved in the pyridoxine dependency with seizures pathway and the lysine degradation pathway. Aminoadipic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the saccharopinuria/hyperlysinemia II pathway, the 2-aminoadipic 2-oxoadipic aciduria pathway, the glutaric aciduria type I pathway, and the hyperlysinemia II or saccharopinuria pathway. Outside of the human body, aminoadipic acid can be found in common sage and spearmint. This makes aminoadipic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Aminoadipic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Aminoadipic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as schizophrenia and alpha-aminoadipic and alpha-ketoadipic aciduria; aminoadipic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including 2-ketoadipic acidemia and alpha-aminoadipic aciduria.
Aminoadipic acid ; HMDB00510 Aminoadipic acid, also known as a-aminoadipate or Aad, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Aminoadipic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Aminoadipic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, aminoadipic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Aminoadipic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Aminoadipic acid can be biosynthesized from allysine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme Alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. In addition, Aminoadipic acid and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into oxoadipic acid and L-glutamic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme kynurenine/alpha-aminoadipate aminotransferase, mitochondrial. In humans, aminoadipic acid is involved in the pyridoxine dependency with seizures pathway and the lysine degradation pathway. Aminoadipic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the saccharopinuria/hyperlysinemia II pathway, the 2-aminoadipic 2-oxoadipic aciduria pathway, the glutaric aciduria type I pathway, and the hyperlysinemia II or saccharopinuria pathway. Outside of the human body, aminoadipic acid can be found in common sage and spearmint. This makes aminoadipic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Aminoadipic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Aminoadipic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as schizophrenia and alpha-aminoadipic and alpha-ketoadipic aciduria; aminoadipic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including 2-ketoadipic acidemia and alpha-aminoadipic aciduria.
Amoxicillin ; HMDB0015193 Amoxicillin, also known as clamoxyl or amopenixin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as penicillins. These are organic compounds containing the penicillin core structure, which is structurally characterized by a penam ring bearing two methyl groups at position 2, and an amide group at position 6 [starting from the sulfur atom at position 1]. Amoxicillin is a drug which is used for the treatment of infections of the ear, nose, and throat, the genitourinary tract, the skin and skin structure, and the lower respiratory tract due to susceptible (only b-lactamase-negative) strains of <i>streptococcus</i> spp (a- and b-hemolytic strains only), <i>s. pneumoniae</i>, <i>staphylococcus</i> spp., <i>h. influenzae</i>, <i>e. coli</i>, <i>p. mirabilis</i>, or <i>e. faecalis</i>. also for the treatment of acute, uncomplicated gonorrhea (ano-genital and urethral infections) due to <i>n. gonorrhoeae</i> (males and females). Amoxicillin exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Amoxicillin has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, amoxicillin is primarily located in the cytoplasm and membrane (predicted from logP). Amoxicillin is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, amoxicillin diketopiperazine, amoxicilloyl polylysine, and amoxicilloyl-butylamine.
Anandamide ; HMDB0004080 Anandamide (20:4, N-6), also known as arachidonylethanolamide or AEA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acylethanolamines. N-acylethanolamines are compounds containing an N-acyethanolamine moiety, which is characterized by an acyl group is linked to the nitrogen atom of ethanolamine. Thus, anandamide (20:4, N-6) is considered to be a fatty amide lipid molecule. Anandamide (20:4, N-6) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Anandamide (20:4, N-6) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, anandamide (20:4, N-6) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Anandamide (20:4, N-6) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, anandamide (20:4, N-6) can be biosynthesized from arachidonic acid. Anandamide (20:4, N-6) is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, N-arachidonoylethanolamine phosphate(2-), N-[(5Z,8Z,14Z)-11,12-epoxyicosatrienoyl]ethanolamine, and O-oleoylanandamide.
Androsterone sulfate ; HMDB0002759 5alpha-Androstane-3alpha-ol-17-one sulfate, also known as 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-androstan-17-one 3-sulfate or 5-androstane-3-ol-17-one sulfuric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sulfated steroids. These are sterol lipids containing a sulfate group attached to the steroid skeleton. 5alpha-Androstane-3alpha-ol-17-one sulfate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 5alpha-Androstane-3alpha-ol-17-one sulfate has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 5alpha-androstane-3alpha-ol-17-one sulfate is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and endoplasmic reticulum. In humans, 5alpha-androstane-3alpha-ol-17-one sulfate is involved in the androgen and estrogen metabolism pathway.
Arachidic acid ; HMDB0002212 Arachidic acid, also known as eicosanoic acid or eicosanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Arachidic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Arachidic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, arachidic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Arachidic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 18-methylicosanoic acid, N-icosanoylsphingosine, and beta-D-galactosyl-(1->4)-beta-D-glucosyl-(11)-N-eicosanoylsphingosine. Outside of the human body, arachidic acid can be found in a number of food items such as nutmeg, oyster mushroom, yardlong bean, and millet. This makes arachidic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Arachidic acid ; HMDB02212 Arachidic acid, also known as eicosanoic acid or eicosanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Arachidic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Arachidic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, arachidic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Arachidic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 18-methylicosanoic acid, N-icosanoylsphingosine, and beta-D-galactosyl-(1->4)-beta-D-glucosyl-(11)-N-eicosanoylsphingosine. Outside of the human body, arachidic acid can be found in a number of food items such as nutmeg, oyster mushroom, yardlong bean, and millet. This makes arachidic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Arachidonic acid ; HMDB0001043 Arachidonic acid, also known as arachidonate or AA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Arachidonic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Arachidonic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, feces, and blood. Arachidonic acid can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in adiposome, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and membrane (predicted from logP). Arachidonic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Arachidonic acid can be biosynthesized from 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid desaturase 1. In addition, Arachidonic acid can be converted into adrenic acid through its interaction with the enzyme elongation OF very long chain fatty acids protein 5. In humans, arachidonic acid is involved in the tolmetin action pathway, the indomethacin action pathway, the acetaminophen action pathway, and the nabumetone action pathway. Arachidonic acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency and the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway. Outside of the human body, arachidonic acid can be found in a number of food items such as yellow zucchini, radish, garfish, and carrot. This makes arachidonic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Arachidonic acid ; HMDB01043 Arachidonic acid, also known as arachidonate or AA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Arachidonic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Arachidonic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, feces, and blood. Arachidonic acid can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in adiposome, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and membrane (predicted from logP). Arachidonic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Arachidonic acid can be biosynthesized from 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid desaturase 1. In addition, Arachidonic acid can be converted into adrenic acid through its interaction with the enzyme elongation OF very long chain fatty acids protein 5. In humans, arachidonic acid is involved in the tolmetin action pathway, the indomethacin action pathway, the acetaminophen action pathway, and the nabumetone action pathway. Arachidonic acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency and the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway. Outside of the human body, arachidonic acid can be found in a number of food items such as yellow zucchini, radish, garfish, and carrot. This makes arachidonic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Arachidonyl carnitine ; HMDB0006455 Arachidonyl carnitine, also known as c20:4(n-6) carnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Arachidonyl carnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Arachidonyl carnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, arachidonyl carnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and mitochondria.
Arachidonyl carnitine ; HMDB06455 Arachidonyl carnitine, also known as c20:4(n-6) carnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Arachidonyl carnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Arachidonyl carnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, arachidonyl carnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and mitochondria.
Aspartylglycosamine ; HMDB0000489 Aspartylglycosamine, also known as aadg or N-adgp-asn, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycosylamines. Glycosylamines are compounds consisting of an amine with a beta-N-glycosidic bond to a carbohydrate, thus forming a cyclic hemiaminal ether bond (alpha-amino ether). Aspartylglycosamine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Aspartylglycosamine has been found in human spleen tissue, and has also been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, aspartylglycosamine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Aspartylglycosamine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including aspartylglucosaminuria.
Asymmetric dimethylarginine ; HMDB0001539 Dimethyl-L-arginine, also known as adma, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as arginine and derivatives. Arginine and derivatives are compounds containing arginine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of arginine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Dimethyl-L-arginine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Dimethyl-L-arginine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, dimethyl-L-arginine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Dimethyl-L-arginine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Dimethyl-L-arginine is a potentially toxic compound.
Asymmetric dimethylarginine ; HMDB01539 Dimethyl-L-arginine, also known as adma, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as arginine and derivatives. Arginine and derivatives are compounds containing arginine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of arginine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Dimethyl-L-arginine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Dimethyl-L-arginine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, dimethyl-L-arginine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Dimethyl-L-arginine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Dimethyl-L-arginine is a potentially toxic compound.
Atenolol ; HMDB0001924 Atenolol, also known as tenormin or unibloc, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylacetamides. These are amide derivatives of phenylacetic acids. Atenolol is a drug which is used for the management of hypertention and long-term management of patients with angina pectoris. Atenolol exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Atenolol has been primarily detected in blood. In humans, atenolol is involved in the atenolol action pathway. Atenolol is a potentially toxic compound.
Atenolol ; HMDB01924 Atenolol, also known as tenormin or unibloc, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylacetamides. These are amide derivatives of phenylacetic acids. Atenolol is a drug which is used for the management of hypertention and long-term management of patients with angina pectoris. Atenolol exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Atenolol has been primarily detected in blood. In humans, atenolol is involved in the atenolol action pathway. Atenolol is a potentially toxic compound.
Azelaic acid ; HMDB0000784 Azelaic acid, also known as azelex or finacea, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Azelaic acid is a drug which is used for the topical treatment of mild-to-moderate inflammatory acne vulgaris. Azelaic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Azelaic acid has been found in human prostate and skin tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, breast milk, saliva, and feces. Within the cell, azelaic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Azelaic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-(8-carboxyoctanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 1-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Azelaic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Azelaic acid ; HMDB00784 Azelaic acid, also known as azelex or finacea, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Azelaic acid is a drug which is used for the topical treatment of mild-to-moderate inflammatory acne vulgaris. Azelaic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Azelaic acid has been found in human prostate and skin tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, breast milk, saliva, and feces. Within the cell, azelaic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Azelaic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-(8-carboxyoctanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 1-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Azelaic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Benzoic acid ; HMDB0001870 Benzoic acid, also known as benzoate or E210, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as benzoic acids. These are organic Compounds containing a benzene ring which bears at least one carboxyl group. Benzoic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Benzoic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, feces, urine, and sweat. Within the cell, benzoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and endoplasmic reticulum. Benzoic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Benzoic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 4-(2-carboxyphenyl)-2-oxobut-3-enoic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-octaprenylbenzoic acid, and hydroxybenzoic acid. Benzoic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
beta-Alanine ; HMDB0000056 Beta-Alanine, also known as 3-aminopropanoate or bala, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids having a (-NH2) group attached to the beta carbon atom. Beta-Alanine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Beta-Alanine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, saliva, and urine. Within the cell, Beta-alanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Beta-Alanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Beta-Alanine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Beta-Alanine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into malonic semialdehyde and L-glutamic acid through its interaction with the enzyme 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Beta-Alanine can be biosynthesized from L-aspartic acid through the action of the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase 1. Furthermore, Beta-Alanine can be biosynthesized from ureidopropionic acid through its interaction with the enzyme Beta-ureidopropionase. Finally, Beta-Alanine and 3-methylhistidine can be biosynthesized from anserine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme Beta-ala-his dipeptidase. In humans, Beta-alanine is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway, the pyrimidine metabolism pathway, the histidine metabolism pathway, and the Beta-alanine metabolism pathway. Beta-Alanine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include dihydropyrimidinase deficiency, Beta ureidopropionase deficiency, the histidinemia pathway, and the canavan disease pathway. Outside of the human body, Beta-alanine can be found in a number of food items such as barley, banana, ceylon cinnamon, and green bean. This makes Beta-alanine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Beta-Alanine is a potentially toxic compound. Beta-Alanine has been found to be associated with the diseases known as methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency; beta-alanine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hyper beta-alaninemia.
beta-Cryptoxanthin ; HMDB0033844 Beta-Cryptoxanthin, also known as 3-hydroxy-b-carotene or b,b-caroten-3-ol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthophylls. These are carotenoids containing an oxygenated carotene backbone. Carotenes are characterized by the presence of two end-groups (mostly cyclohexene rings, but also cyclopentene rings or acyclic groups) linked by a long branched alkyl chain. Carotenes belonging form a subgroup of the carotenoids family. Xanthophylls arise by oxygenation of the carotene backbone. Beta-Cryptoxanthin exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Beta-Cryptoxanthin has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and breast milk. Within the cell, Beta-cryptoxanthin is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, Beta-cryptoxanthin can be found in a number of food items such as cowpea, garlic, mandarin orange (clementine, tangerine), and sake. This makes Beta-cryptoxanthin a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Betaine ; HMDB0000043 Betaine, also known as glycine betaine or acidin pepsin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Betaine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Betaine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, breast milk, saliva, and urine. Within the cell, betaine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Betaine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Betaine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Betaine and homocysteine can be converted into dimethylglycine and L-methionine; which is mediated by the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Furthermore, Betaine can be biosynthesized from betaine aldehyde through the action of the enzyme Alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. Furthermore, Betaine and homocysteine can be converted into dimethylglycine and L-methionine; which is mediated by the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Finally, Betaine can be biosynthesized from choline; which is catalyzed by the enzyme choline dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In humans, betaine is involved in the sarcosine oncometabolite pathway, the methionine metabolism pathway, the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, and the betaine metabolism pathway. Betaine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway, the sarcosinemia pathway, glycine N-methyltransferase deficiency, and cystathionine Beta-synthase deficiency. Betaine is a bland tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as shiitake, garden tomato (var.), wax gourd, and olive. This makes betaine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Betaine ; HMDB00043 Betaine, also known as glycine betaine or acidin pepsin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Betaine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Betaine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, breast milk, saliva, and urine. Within the cell, betaine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Betaine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Betaine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Betaine and homocysteine can be converted into dimethylglycine and L-methionine; which is mediated by the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Furthermore, Betaine can be biosynthesized from betaine aldehyde through the action of the enzyme Alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. Furthermore, Betaine and homocysteine can be converted into dimethylglycine and L-methionine; which is mediated by the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Finally, Betaine can be biosynthesized from choline; which is catalyzed by the enzyme choline dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In humans, betaine is involved in the sarcosine oncometabolite pathway, the methionine metabolism pathway, the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, and the betaine metabolism pathway. Betaine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway, the sarcosinemia pathway, glycine N-methyltransferase deficiency, and cystathionine Beta-synthase deficiency. Betaine is a bland tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as shiitake, garden tomato (var.), wax gourd, and olive. This makes betaine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Betonicine ; HMDB0029412 Betonicine, also known as achillein, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as proline and derivatives. Proline and derivatives are compounds containing proline or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of proline at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Betonicine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Betonicine has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, betonicine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Betonicine can be biosynthesized from trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline zwitterion. Outside of the human body, betonicine can be found in herbs and spices and pulses. This makes betonicine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Bilirubin ; HMDB0000054 4E,15Z-Bilirubin ixa belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. 4E,15Z-Bilirubin ixa is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 4E,15Z-Bilirubin ixa has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, 4E,15Z-bilirubin ixa is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
Bilirubin ; HMDB00054 4E,15Z-Bilirubin ixa belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. 4E,15Z-Bilirubin ixa is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 4E,15Z-Bilirubin ixa has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, 4E,15Z-bilirubin ixa is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
Biliverdin ; HMDB0001008 Biliverdin, also known as biliverdin ix or dehydrobilirubin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. Biliverdin is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Biliverdin has been found in human prostate and placenta tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, biliverdin is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and nucleus. In humans, biliverdin is involved in the porphyrin metabolism pathway. Biliverdin is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the acute intermittent porphyria pathway, congenital erythropoietic porphyria (cep) or gunther disease pathway, the porphyria variegata (PV) pathway, and the hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) pathway.
Biliverdin ; HMDB01008 Biliverdin, also known as biliverdin ix or dehydrobilirubin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. Biliverdin is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Biliverdin has been found in human prostate and placenta tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, biliverdin is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and nucleus. In humans, biliverdin is involved in the porphyrin metabolism pathway. Biliverdin is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the acute intermittent porphyria pathway, congenital erythropoietic porphyria (cep) or gunther disease pathway, the porphyria variegata (PV) pathway, and the hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) pathway.
Bromine ; HMDB0031434 Bromine, also known as brom or BR2, belongs to the class of inorganic compounds known as homogeneous halogens. These are inorganic non-metallic compounds in which the largest atom is a nobel gas. Outside of the human body, bromine can be found in a number of food items such as orange bell pepper, bilberry, common grape, and white cabbage. This makes bromine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Bromine is a potentially toxic compound.
Butyrylcarnitine ; HMDB0002013 , also known as butyrylcarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including glutaric aciduria II.
Butyrylcarnitine ; HMDB02013 , also known as butyrylcarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including glutaric aciduria II.
Caffeine ; HMDB0001847 Caffeine, also known as coffein or theine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. Caffeine is a drug which is used for management of fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, and for the short term treatment of apnea of prematurity in infants. Caffeine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and an extremely weak basic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). Caffeine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, feces, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, caffeine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Caffeine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Caffeine can be converted into paraxanthine and formaldehyde through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 1A2. In addition, Caffeine can be converted into theobromine and formaldehyde; which is catalyzed by the enzymes cytochrome P450 1A2 and cytochrome P450 2E1. In humans, caffeine is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, caffeine can be found in pulses. This makes caffeine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. Caffeine is a potentially toxic compound.
Caffeine ; HMDB01847 Caffeine, also known as coffein or theine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as xanthines. These are purine derivatives with a ketone group conjugated at carbons 2 and 6 of the purine moiety. Caffeine is a drug which is used for management of fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, and for the short term treatment of apnea of prematurity in infants. Caffeine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and an extremely weak basic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). Caffeine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, feces, cerebrospinal fluid, and urine. Within the cell, caffeine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Caffeine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Caffeine can be converted into paraxanthine and formaldehyde through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 1A2. In addition, Caffeine can be converted into theobromine and formaldehyde; which is catalyzed by the enzymes cytochrome P450 1A2 and cytochrome P450 2E1. In humans, caffeine is involved in the caffeine metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, caffeine can be found in pulses. This makes caffeine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. Caffeine is a potentially toxic compound.
Campesterol ; HMDB0002869 Campesterol belongs to the class of organic compounds known as ergosterols and derivatives. These are steroids containing ergosta-5,7,22-trien-3beta-ol or a derivative thereof, which is based on the 3beta-hydroxylated ergostane skeleton. Thus, campesterol is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. Campesterol exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Campesterol has been found in human kidney, muscle and hepatic tissue tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, campesterol is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Campesterol can be biosynthesized from campestane.
Campesterol ; HMDB02869 Campesterol belongs to the class of organic compounds known as ergosterols and derivatives. These are steroids containing ergosta-5,7,22-trien-3beta-ol or a derivative thereof, which is based on the 3beta-hydroxylated ergostane skeleton. Thus, campesterol is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. Campesterol exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Campesterol has been found in human kidney, muscle and hepatic tissue tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, campesterol is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Campesterol can be biosynthesized from campestane.
Capric acid ; HMDB0000511 Capric acid, also known as decanoate or decylic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Capric acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Capric acid has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, sweat, feces, and breast milk. Within the cell, capric acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Capric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Capric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Capric acid can be biosynthesized from trans-dec-2-enoic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Furthermore, Capric acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxododecanoic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. Furthermore, Capric acid can be biosynthesized from trans-dec-2-enoic acid through the action of the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Finally, Capric acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxododecanoic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. In humans, capric acid is involved in fatty acid biosynthesis pathway and the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway. Outside of the human body, capric acid can be found in a number of food items such as daikon radish, thistle, sacred lotus, and garden tomato (var.). This makes capric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Capric acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Capric acid ; HMDB00511 Capric acid, also known as decanoate or decylic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Capric acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Capric acid has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, sweat, feces, and breast milk. Within the cell, capric acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Capric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Capric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Capric acid can be biosynthesized from trans-dec-2-enoic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Furthermore, Capric acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxododecanoic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. Furthermore, Capric acid can be biosynthesized from trans-dec-2-enoic acid through the action of the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Finally, Capric acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxododecanoic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. In humans, capric acid is involved in fatty acid biosynthesis pathway and the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway. Outside of the human body, capric acid can be found in a number of food items such as daikon radish, thistle, sacred lotus, and garden tomato (var.). This makes capric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Capric acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Caproate (6:0) ; HMDB0061883 Caproic acid, also known as hexanoate or caproate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Caproic acid exists as a liquid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Caproic acid has been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, feces, sweat, and urine. Within the cell, caproic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Caproic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, caproic acid is involved in fatty acid biosynthesis pathway and the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway. Caproic acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF short chain saturated fatty acids pathway and short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (schad). Outside of the human body, caproic acid can be found in a number of food items such as sweet basil, wild carrot, agar, and wax gourd. This makes caproic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Caproic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Caproic acid has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.
Caprylic acid ; HMDB0000482 Caprylic acid, also known as 8:0 or octylic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Caprylic acid exists as a liquid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Caprylic acid has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, feces, urine, and sweat. Within the cell, caprylic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Caprylic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Caprylic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Caprylic acid can be biosynthesized from trans-2-octenoic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Furthermore, Caprylic acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxodecanoic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. Furthermore, Caprylic acid can be biosynthesized from trans-2-octenoic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Finally, Caprylic acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxodecanoic acid through the action of the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. In humans, caprylic acid is involved in the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway and fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Caprylic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF short chain saturated fatty acids pathway. Outside of the human body, caprylic acid can be found in tea. This makes caprylic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. Caprylic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Caprylic acid ; HMDB00482 Caprylic acid, also known as 8:0 or octylic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Caprylic acid exists as a liquid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Caprylic acid has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, feces, urine, and sweat. Within the cell, caprylic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Caprylic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Caprylic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Caprylic acid can be biosynthesized from trans-2-octenoic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Furthermore, Caprylic acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxodecanoic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. Furthermore, Caprylic acid can be biosynthesized from trans-2-octenoic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Finally, Caprylic acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxodecanoic acid through the action of the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. In humans, caprylic acid is involved in the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway and fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Caprylic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF short chain saturated fatty acids pathway. Outside of the human body, caprylic acid can be found in tea. This makes caprylic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. Caprylic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Capryloylglycine ; HMDB0000832 Capryloylglycine, also known as 2-octanamidoacetate or N-octanoyl-glycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. Capryloylglycine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Capryloylglycine has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, capryloylglycine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Capryloylglycine can be biosynthesized from octanoic acid and glycine.
Carboxy-ibuprofen ; HMDB0060564 Carboxy-ibuprofen is a metabolite of ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for relief of symptoms of arthritis, fever, as an analgesic (pain reliever), especially where there is an inflammatory component, and dysmenorrhea. Ibuprofen is known to have an antiplatelet effect, though it is relatively mild and somewhat short-lived when compared with aspirin or other better-known antiplatelet drugs. (Wikipedia)
Carnosine ; HMDB0000033 Carnosine, also known as b-alanylhistidine or ignotine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hybrid peptides. Hybrid peptides are compounds containing at least two different types of amino acids (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) linked to each other through a peptide bond. Carnosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Carnosine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, carnosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Carnosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Carnosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Carnosine can be converted into Beta-alanine and L-histidine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme Beta-ala-his dipeptidase. In addition, Carnosine can be converted into Beta-alanine and L-histidine through the action of the enzyme Beta-ala-his dipeptidase. In humans, carnosine is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway and the Beta-alanine metabolism pathway. Carnosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the carnosinuria, carnosinemia pathway, the histidinemia pathway, gaba-transaminase deficiency, and ureidopropionase deficiency. Carnosine has been found to be associated with the diseases known as alzheimer's disease; carnosine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including carnosinuria.
CE(14:0) ; HMDB0006725 14:0 Cholesteryl ester, also known as cholesteryl myristate or 1-myristoyl-cholesterol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Thus, 14:0 cholesteryl ester is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. 14:0 Cholesteryl ester is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 14:0 Cholesteryl ester has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 14:0 cholesteryl ester is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 14:0 Cholesteryl ester exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
CE(14:0) ; HMDB06725 14:0 Cholesteryl ester, also known as cholesteryl myristate or 1-myristoyl-cholesterol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Thus, 14:0 cholesteryl ester is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. 14:0 Cholesteryl ester is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 14:0 Cholesteryl ester has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 14:0 cholesteryl ester is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 14:0 Cholesteryl ester exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
CE(16:0) ; HMDB0000885 16:0 Cholesteryl ester, also known as CE or cholesterol palmitate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Thus, 16:0 cholesteryl ester is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. 16:0 Cholesteryl ester exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. 16:0 Cholesteryl ester has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 16:0 cholesteryl ester is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 16:0 Cholesteryl ester exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 16:0 Cholesteryl ester has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hypercholesterolemia.
CE(16:0) ; HMDB00885 16:0 Cholesteryl ester, also known as CE or cholesterol palmitate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Thus, 16:0 cholesteryl ester is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. 16:0 Cholesteryl ester exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. 16:0 Cholesteryl ester has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 16:0 cholesteryl ester is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 16:0 Cholesteryl ester exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 16:0 Cholesteryl ester has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hypercholesterolemia.
CE(16:1(9Z)) ; HMDB0000658 16:1 Cholesteryl ester, also known as cholesteryl 9-palmitoleate or 1-palmitoleoyl-cholesterol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Thus, 16:1 cholesteryl ester is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. 16:1 Cholesteryl ester is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 16:1 Cholesteryl ester has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 16:1 cholesteryl ester is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 16:1 Cholesteryl ester can be biosynthesized from (9Z)-hexadecenoic acid.
CE(16:1(9Z)) ; HMDB00658 16:1 Cholesteryl ester, also known as cholesteryl 9-palmitoleate or 1-palmitoleoyl-cholesterol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Thus, 16:1 cholesteryl ester is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. 16:1 Cholesteryl ester is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 16:1 Cholesteryl ester has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, 16:1 cholesteryl ester is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. 16:1 Cholesteryl ester can be biosynthesized from (9Z)-hexadecenoic acid.
CE(18:0) ; HMDB0010368 Ce(18:0), also known as ce(18:0/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(18:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(18:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(18:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Ce(18:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, ce(18:0) is involved in the ibandronate action pathway, the zoledronate action pathway, the lovastatin action pathway, and the simvastatin action pathway. Ce(18:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the cholesteryl ester storage disease pathway, the wolman disease pathway, the mevalonic aciduria pathway, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (wolman disease).
CE(18:0) ; HMDB10368 Ce(18:0), also known as ce(18:0/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(18:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(18:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(18:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Ce(18:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, ce(18:0) is involved in the ibandronate action pathway, the zoledronate action pathway, the lovastatin action pathway, and the simvastatin action pathway. Ce(18:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the cholesteryl ester storage disease pathway, the wolman disease pathway, the mevalonic aciduria pathway, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (wolman disease).
CE(18:1(9Z)) ; HMDB0000918 Ce(18:1(9Z)), also known as ce(18:1) or ce(18:1n9/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(18:1(9Z)) exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Ce(18:1(9Z)) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(18:1(9Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), myelin sheath and cytoplasm.
CE(18:1(9Z)) ; HMDB00918 Ce(18:1(9Z)), also known as ce(18:1) or ce(18:1n9/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(18:1(9Z)) exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Ce(18:1(9Z)) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(18:1(9Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), myelin sheath and cytoplasm.
CE(18:2(9Z,12Z)) ; HMDB0000610 Ce(18:2(9Z,12Z)), also known as ce(18:2) or ce(18:2n6/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(18:2(9Z,12Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(18:2(9Z,12Z)) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(18:2(9Z,12Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(18:2(9Z,12Z)) ; HMDB00610 Ce(18:2(9Z,12Z)), also known as ce(18:2) or ce(18:2n6/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(18:2(9Z,12Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(18:2(9Z,12Z)) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(18:2(9Z,12Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) ; HMDB0010370 Ce(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)), also known as cholesterol linolenate or ce(18:3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) ; HMDB10370 Ce(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)), also known as cholesterol linolenate or ce(18:3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) ; HMDB0006736 Ce(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)), also known as 20:3 cholesterol ester or ce(20:3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) ; HMDB06736 Ce(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)), also known as 20:3 cholesterol ester or ce(20:3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) ; HMDB0006726 Ce(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)), also known as cholesterol arachidonate or 20:4 cholesterol ester, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, ce(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
CE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) ; HMDB06726 Ce(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)), also known as cholesterol arachidonate or 20:4 cholesterol ester, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, ce(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
CE(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z) ; HMDB0006731 Ce(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z), also known as 20:5 cholesterol ester or cholesteryl eicosapentaenoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z) ; HMDB06731 Ce(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z), also known as 20:5 cholesterol ester or cholesteryl eicosapentaenoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) ; HMDB0006729 Ce(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)), also known as cholesteryl 1-adrenoic acid or 22:4 cholesterol ester, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, ce(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) ; HMDB06729 Ce(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)), also known as cholesteryl 1-adrenoic acid or 22:4 cholesterol ester, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, ce(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) ; HMDB0010375 Ce(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)), also known as cholesteryl 1-docosapentaenoate or ce(22:5/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) ; HMDB10375 Ce(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)), also known as cholesteryl 1-docosapentaenoate or ce(22:5/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) ; HMDB0006733 Ce(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)), also known as cholesteryl docosahexaenoate or 22:6 cholesterol ester, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
CE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) ; HMDB06733 Ce(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)), also known as cholesteryl docosahexaenoate or 22:6 cholesterol ester, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesteryl esters. Cholesteryl esters are compounds containing an esterified cholestane moiety. Ce(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ce(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) has been found in human hepatic tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, ce(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
Cer(d18:1/24:1(15Z)) ; HMDB0004953 Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)), also known as C24:1 cer or N-nervonylsphingosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as ceramides. These are lipid molecules containing a sphingosine in which the amine group is linked to a fatty acid. Thus, cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) is considered to be a ceramide lipid molecule. Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in endosome, cytoplasm, mitochondria, and membrane (predicted from logP). Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) can be biosynthesized from (15Z)-tetracosenoic acid.
Cer(d18:1/24:1(15Z)) ; HMDB04953 Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)), also known as C24:1 cer or N-nervonylsphingosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as ceramides. These are lipid molecules containing a sphingosine in which the amine group is linked to a fatty acid. Thus, cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) is considered to be a ceramide lipid molecule. Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in endosome, cytoplasm, mitochondria, and membrane (predicted from logP). Cer(D18:1/24:1(15Z)) can be biosynthesized from (15Z)-tetracosenoic acid.
Ceramide (d18:1/16:0) ; HMDB0004949 Cer(D18:1/16:0), also known as C16 cer or nfa(C16)cer, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain ceramides. These are ceramides bearing a long chain fatty acid. Thus, cer(D18:1/16:0) is considered to be a ceramide lipid molecule. Cer(D18:1/16:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cer(D18:1/16:0) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Cer(D18:1/16:0) can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in cytoplasm, intracellular membrane, membrane (predicted from logP), and myelin sheath. Cer(D18:1/16:0) can be biosynthesized from hexadecanoic acid.
Ceramide (d18:1/16:0) ; HMDB04949 Cer(D18:1/16:0), also known as C16 cer or nfa(C16)cer, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain ceramides. These are ceramides bearing a long chain fatty acid. Thus, cer(D18:1/16:0) is considered to be a ceramide lipid molecule. Cer(D18:1/16:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cer(D18:1/16:0) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Cer(D18:1/16:0) can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in cytoplasm, intracellular membrane, membrane (predicted from logP), and myelin sheath. Cer(D18:1/16:0) can be biosynthesized from hexadecanoic acid.
Ceramide (d18:1/22:0) ; HMDB0004952 Cer(D18:1/22:0), also known as C22 cer or ceramide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as ceramides. These are lipid molecules containing a sphingosine in which the amine group is linked to a fatty acid. Thus, cer(D18:1/22:0) is considered to be a ceramide lipid molecule. Cer(D18:1/22:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cer(D18:1/22:0) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Cer(D18:1/22:0) can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in myelin sheath, endosome, cytoplasm, and intracellular membrane. Cer(D18:1/22:0) can be biosynthesized from docosanoic acid.
Ceramide (d18:1/22:0) ; HMDB04952 Cer(D18:1/22:0), also known as C22 cer or ceramide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as ceramides. These are lipid molecules containing a sphingosine in which the amine group is linked to a fatty acid. Thus, cer(D18:1/22:0) is considered to be a ceramide lipid molecule. Cer(D18:1/22:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cer(D18:1/22:0) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Cer(D18:1/22:0) can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in myelin sheath, endosome, cytoplasm, and intracellular membrane. Cer(D18:1/22:0) can be biosynthesized from docosanoic acid.
Ceramide (d18:1/24:0) ; HMDB0004956 Cer(D18:1/24:0), also known as C24 cer or ceramide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as ceramides. These are lipid molecules containing a sphingosine in which the amine group is linked to a fatty acid. Thus, cer(D18:1/24:0) is considered to be a ceramide lipid molecule. Cer(D18:1/24:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cer(D18:1/24:0) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Cer(D18:1/24:0) can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in intracellular membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, and endosome. Cer(D18:1/24:0) can be biosynthesized from tetracosanoic acid.
Ceramide (d18:1/24:0) ; HMDB04956 Cer(D18:1/24:0), also known as C24 cer or ceramide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as ceramides. These are lipid molecules containing a sphingosine in which the amine group is linked to a fatty acid. Thus, cer(D18:1/24:0) is considered to be a ceramide lipid molecule. Cer(D18:1/24:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cer(D18:1/24:0) has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Cer(D18:1/24:0) can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in intracellular membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, and endosome. Cer(D18:1/24:0) can be biosynthesized from tetracosanoic acid.
Chenodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB0000518 Chenodeoxycholic acid, also known as chenodeoxycholate or chenix, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Chenodeoxycholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Chenodeoxycholic acid has been found in human hepatic tissue and liver tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, chenodeoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Chenodeoxycholic acid can be biosynthesized from chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and cholic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acyl-CoA synthetase. In humans, chenodeoxycholic acid is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Chenodeoxycholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the zellweger syndrome pathway.
Chenodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB00518 Chenodeoxycholic acid, also known as chenodeoxycholate or chenix, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Chenodeoxycholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Chenodeoxycholic acid has been found in human hepatic tissue and liver tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, chenodeoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Chenodeoxycholic acid can be biosynthesized from chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and cholic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acyl-CoA synthetase. In humans, chenodeoxycholic acid is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Chenodeoxycholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the zellweger syndrome pathway.
Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate ; HMDB0000637 Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate, also known as (23R)-hydroxychenodeoxycholylglycine or 12-deoxycholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate has been found in human hepatic tissue and prostate tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate and glycocholic acid can be biosynthesized from chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and glycine through its interaction with the enzyme bile acid-coa:amino acid N-acyltransferase. In humans, chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway. Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the zellweger syndrome pathway, the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, and 27-hydroxylase deficiency.
Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate ; HMDB00637 Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate, also known as (23R)-hydroxychenodeoxycholylglycine or 12-deoxycholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate has been found in human hepatic tissue and prostate tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate and glycocholic acid can be biosynthesized from chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and glycine through its interaction with the enzyme bile acid-coa:amino acid N-acyltransferase. In humans, chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway. Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the zellweger syndrome pathway, the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, and 27-hydroxylase deficiency.
Cholestenone ; HMDB0000921 Cholestenone belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesterols and derivatives. Cholesterols and derivatives are compounds containing a 3-hydroxylated cholestane core. Thus, cholestenone is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. Cholestenone exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cholestenone has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, cholestenone is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Cholestenone is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 3-ketocholest-4-en-26-al, 26-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one, and 7alpha,25-dihydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one.
Cholesterol ; HMDB0000067 Cholesterol, also known as cholesterin or cordulan, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesterols and derivatives. Cholesterols and derivatives are compounds containing a 3-hydroxylated cholestane core. Thus, cholesterol is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. Cholesterol exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cholesterol has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and bile. Cholesterol can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in lysosome, cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), and endoplasmic reticulum. Cholesterol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Cholesterol can be converted into 22b-hydroxycholesterol through its interaction with the enzyme cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Cholesterol can be converted into 20alpha-hydroxycholesterol through its interaction with the enzyme cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Cholesterol can be converted into 7a-hydroxycholesterol through its interaction with the enzyme cholesterol 7-alpha-monooxygenase. Finally, Cholesterol and palmitic acid can be biosynthesized from ce(22:2(13Z,16Z)) through the action of the enzyme lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl ester hydrolase. In humans, cholesterol is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, steroid biosynthesis pathway, the lovastatin action pathway, and the zoledronate action pathway. Cholesterol is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the child syndrome pathway, adrenal hyperplasia type 5 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 17 Alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, the apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome pathway, and the hypercholesterolemia pathway.
Cholesterol ; HMDB00067 Cholesterol, also known as cholesterin or cordulan, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholesterols and derivatives. Cholesterols and derivatives are compounds containing a 3-hydroxylated cholestane core. Thus, cholesterol is considered to be a sterol lipid molecule. Cholesterol exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cholesterol has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and bile. Cholesterol can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in lysosome, cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), and endoplasmic reticulum. Cholesterol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Cholesterol can be converted into 22b-hydroxycholesterol through its interaction with the enzyme cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Cholesterol can be converted into 20alpha-hydroxycholesterol through its interaction with the enzyme cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Cholesterol can be converted into 7a-hydroxycholesterol through its interaction with the enzyme cholesterol 7-alpha-monooxygenase. Finally, Cholesterol and palmitic acid can be biosynthesized from ce(22:2(13Z,16Z)) through the action of the enzyme lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl ester hydrolase. In humans, cholesterol is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, steroid biosynthesis pathway, the lovastatin action pathway, and the zoledronate action pathway. Cholesterol is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the child syndrome pathway, adrenal hyperplasia type 5 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 17 Alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, the apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome pathway, and the hypercholesterolemia pathway.
Cholic acid ; HMDB0000619 Cholic acid, also known as cholate or cholsaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as trihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are prenol lipids structurally characterized by a bile acid or alcohol which bears three hydroxyl groups. Cholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, cholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Cholic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and cholic acid can be converted into chenodeoxycholic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme bile acyl-CoA synthetase. In addition, Cholic acid can be biosynthesized from choloyl-CoA; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acyl-CoA synthetase. In humans, cholic acid is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Cholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the zellweger syndrome pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway. Outside of the human body, cholic acid can be found in a number of food items such as ginkgo nuts, celeriac, lotus, and small-leaf linden. This makes cholic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Cholic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Cholic acid ; HMDB00619 Cholic acid, also known as cholate or cholsaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as trihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are prenol lipids structurally characterized by a bile acid or alcohol which bears three hydroxyl groups. Cholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, cholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Cholic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and cholic acid can be converted into chenodeoxycholic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme bile acyl-CoA synthetase. In addition, Cholic acid can be biosynthesized from choloyl-CoA; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acyl-CoA synthetase. In humans, cholic acid is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Cholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the zellweger syndrome pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway. Outside of the human body, cholic acid can be found in a number of food items such as ginkgo nuts, celeriac, lotus, and small-leaf linden. This makes cholic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Cholic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Choline ; HMDB0000097 Choline, also known as bilineurine or choline ion, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholines. These are organic compounds containing a N,N,N-trimethylethanolammonium cation. Choline is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Choline exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Choline has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Choline can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in nucleus, myelin sheath, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum. Choline exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Choline participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Choline can be converted into betaine aldehyde; which is mediated by the enzyme choline dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In addition, Choline can be converted into betaine; which is mediated by the enzyme choline dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In humans, choline is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:1(9Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:0/20:2(11Z,14Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:1(9Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway. Choline is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include glycine N-methyltransferase deficiency, the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway, methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency, and S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency.
Choline ; HMDB00097 Choline, also known as bilineurine or choline ion, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cholines. These are organic compounds containing a N,N,N-trimethylethanolammonium cation. Choline is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Choline exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Choline has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Choline can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in nucleus, myelin sheath, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum. Choline exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Choline participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Choline can be converted into betaine aldehyde; which is mediated by the enzyme choline dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In addition, Choline can be converted into betaine; which is mediated by the enzyme choline dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In humans, choline is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:1(9Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:0/20:2(11Z,14Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:1(9Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway. Choline is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include glycine N-methyltransferase deficiency, the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway, methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency, and S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency.
Cinnamoylglycine ; HMDB0011621 Cinnamoylglycine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. Cinnamoylglycine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cinnamoylglycine has been primarily detected in blood.
Cinnamoylglycine ; HMDB11621 Cinnamoylglycine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. Cinnamoylglycine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Cinnamoylglycine has been primarily detected in blood.
cis-5-Tetradecenoylcarnitine ; HMDB0002014 cis-5-Tetradecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, cis-5-tetradecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. cis-5-Tetradecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. cis-5-Tetradecenoylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, cis-5-tetradecenoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
cis-5-Tetradecenoylcarnitine ; HMDB02014 cis-5-Tetradecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, cis-5-tetradecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. cis-5-Tetradecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. cis-5-Tetradecenoylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, cis-5-tetradecenoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
cis-Aconitic acid ; HMDB0000072 cis-Aconitic acid, also known as cis-aconitate or acid, acontic, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tricarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are carboxylic acids containing exactly three carboxyl groups. cis-Aconitic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). cis-Aconitic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, urine, breast milk, and saliva. Within the cell, cis-aconitic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. cis-Aconitic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. cis-Aconitic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, cis-Aconitic acid can be biosynthesized from citric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme aconitate hydratase, mitochondrial. In addition, cis-Aconitic acid can be converted into isocitric acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme aconitate hydratase, mitochondrial. In humans, cis-aconitic acid is involved in the congenital lactic acidosis pathway, the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway, the oncogenic action OF succinate pathway, and the oncogenic action OF 2-hydroxyglutarate pathway. cis-Aconitic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the glutaminolysis and cancer pathway, mitochondrial complex II deficiency, fumarase deficiency, and 2-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency. cis-Aconitic acid is a very mild, musty, and nutty tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as barley, corn, red beetroot, and potato. This makes cis-aconitic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
cis-Aconitic acid ; HMDB00072 cis-Aconitic acid, also known as cis-aconitate or acid, acontic, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tricarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are carboxylic acids containing exactly three carboxyl groups. cis-Aconitic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). cis-Aconitic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, urine, breast milk, and saliva. Within the cell, cis-aconitic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. cis-Aconitic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. cis-Aconitic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, cis-Aconitic acid can be biosynthesized from citric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme aconitate hydratase, mitochondrial. In addition, cis-Aconitic acid can be converted into isocitric acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme aconitate hydratase, mitochondrial. In humans, cis-aconitic acid is involved in the congenital lactic acidosis pathway, the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway, the oncogenic action OF succinate pathway, and the oncogenic action OF 2-hydroxyglutarate pathway. cis-Aconitic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the glutaminolysis and cancer pathway, mitochondrial complex II deficiency, fumarase deficiency, and 2-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency. cis-Aconitic acid is a very mild, musty, and nutty tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as barley, corn, red beetroot, and potato. This makes cis-aconitic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Citramalic acid ; HMDB0000426 2-Hydroxy-2-methylbutanedioic acid, also known as citramalate or alpha-hydroxypyrotartaric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. 2-Hydroxy-2-methylbutanedioic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxy-2-methylbutanedioic acid has been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, 2-hydroxy-2-methylbutanedioic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Hydroxy-2-methylbutanedioic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. 2-Hydroxy-2-methylbutanedioic acid can be biosynthesized from succinic acid. Outside of the human body, 2-hydroxy-2-methylbutanedioic acid can be found in pomes. This makes 2-hydroxy-2-methylbutanedioic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Citric acid ; HMDB0000094 Citric acid, also known as citrate or citronensaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tricarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are carboxylic acids containing exactly three carboxyl groups. Citric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Citric acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and breast milk. Within the cell, citric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Citric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Citric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Citric acid can be biosynthesized from oxalacetic acid through the action of the enzyme citrate synthase, mitochondrial. In addition, Citric acid can be converted into cis-aconitic acid through the action of the enzyme aconitate hydratase, mitochondrial. In humans, citric acid is involved in the oncogenic action OF 2-hydroxyglutarate pathway, the citric Acid cycle pathway, the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway, and the congenital lactic acidosis pathway. Citric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the oncogenic action OF D-2-hydroxyglutarate in hydroxygluaricaciduria pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (e2), the oncogenic action OF L-2-hydroxyglutarate in hydroxygluaricaciduria pathway, and fumarase deficiency. Outside of the human body, citric acid can be found in a number of food items such as opium poppy, red raspberry, devilfish, and bamboo shoots. This makes citric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Citric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as rhabdomyolysis and deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures syndrome; citric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including maple syrup urine disease, primary hypomagnesemia, and tyrosinemia I.
Citric acid ; HMDB00094 Citric acid, also known as citrate or citronensaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tricarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are carboxylic acids containing exactly three carboxyl groups. Citric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Citric acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and breast milk. Within the cell, citric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Citric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Citric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Citric acid can be biosynthesized from oxalacetic acid through the action of the enzyme citrate synthase, mitochondrial. In addition, Citric acid can be converted into cis-aconitic acid through the action of the enzyme aconitate hydratase, mitochondrial. In humans, citric acid is involved in the oncogenic action OF 2-hydroxyglutarate pathway, the citric Acid cycle pathway, the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway, and the congenital lactic acidosis pathway. Citric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the oncogenic action OF D-2-hydroxyglutarate in hydroxygluaricaciduria pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (e2), the oncogenic action OF L-2-hydroxyglutarate in hydroxygluaricaciduria pathway, and fumarase deficiency. Outside of the human body, citric acid can be found in a number of food items such as opium poppy, red raspberry, devilfish, and bamboo shoots. This makes citric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Citric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as rhabdomyolysis and deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures syndrome; citric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including maple syrup urine disease, primary hypomagnesemia, and tyrosinemia I.
Citrulline ; HMDB0000904 Citrulline, also known as Cit or -ureidonorvaline, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Citrulline is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Citrulline exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Citrulline has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, blood, feces, and urine. Within the cell, citrulline is primarily located in the mitochondria, myelin sheath and cytoplasm. Citrulline exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Citrulline participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Citrulline and L-aspartic acid can be converted into argininosuccinic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme argininosuccinate synthase. Furthermore, Citrulline can be biosynthesized from carbamoyl phosphate and ornithine through the action of the enzyme ornithine carbamoyltransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Citrulline can be biosynthesized from carbamoyl phosphate and ornithine; which is mediated by the enzyme ornithine carbamoyltransferase, mitochondrial. Finally, Citrulline and L-aspartic acid can be converted into argininosuccinic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme argininosuccinate synthase. In humans, citrulline is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway, the urea cycle pathway, and the arginine and proline metabolism pathway. Citrulline is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the argininosuccinic aciduria pathway, creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, the hypoacetylaspartia pathway, and the hyperprolinemia type II pathway. Citrulline is a potentially toxic compound.
Citrulline ; HMDB00904 Citrulline, also known as Cit or -ureidonorvaline, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Citrulline is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Citrulline exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Citrulline has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, blood, feces, and urine. Within the cell, citrulline is primarily located in the mitochondria, myelin sheath and cytoplasm. Citrulline exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Citrulline participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Citrulline and L-aspartic acid can be converted into argininosuccinic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme argininosuccinate synthase. Furthermore, Citrulline can be biosynthesized from carbamoyl phosphate and ornithine through the action of the enzyme ornithine carbamoyltransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Citrulline can be biosynthesized from carbamoyl phosphate and ornithine; which is mediated by the enzyme ornithine carbamoyltransferase, mitochondrial. Finally, Citrulline and L-aspartic acid can be converted into argininosuccinic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme argininosuccinate synthase. In humans, citrulline is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway, the urea cycle pathway, and the arginine and proline metabolism pathway. Citrulline is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the argininosuccinic aciduria pathway, creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, the hypoacetylaspartia pathway, and the hyperprolinemia type II pathway. Citrulline is a potentially toxic compound.
Corticosterone ; HMDB0001547 Corticosterone, also known as 17-deoxycortisol or 11-b, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 21-hydroxysteroids. These are steroids carrying a hydroxyl group at the 21-position of the steroid backbone. Thus, corticosterone is considered to be a steroid lipid molecule. Corticosterone exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Corticosterone has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, corticosterone is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Corticosterone participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Corticosterone can be converted into 18-hydroxycorticosterone through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 11B1. In addition, Corticosterone can be biosynthesized from 11b-hydroxyprogesterone through its interaction with the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase. In humans, corticosterone is involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. Corticosterone is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include 21-hydroxylase deficiency (cyp21), adrenal hyperplasia type 3 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome pathway, and 3-Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency.
Corticosterone ; HMDB01547 Corticosterone, also known as 17-deoxycortisol or 11-b, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 21-hydroxysteroids. These are steroids carrying a hydroxyl group at the 21-position of the steroid backbone. Thus, corticosterone is considered to be a steroid lipid molecule. Corticosterone exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Corticosterone has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, corticosterone is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Corticosterone participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Corticosterone can be converted into 18-hydroxycorticosterone through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 11B1. In addition, Corticosterone can be biosynthesized from 11b-hydroxyprogesterone through its interaction with the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase. In humans, corticosterone is involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. Corticosterone is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include 21-hydroxylase deficiency (cyp21), adrenal hyperplasia type 3 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome pathway, and 3-Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency.
Cortisol ; HMDB0000063 Cortisol, also known as epicort or cortril, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 21-hydroxysteroids. These are steroids carrying a hydroxyl group at the 21-position of the steroid backbone. Thus, cortisol is considered to be a steroid lipid molecule. Cortisol is a drug which is used for the relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses. also used to treat endocrine (hormonal) disorders (adrenal insufficiency, addisons disease). it is also used to treat many immune and allergic disorders, such as arthritis, lupus, severe psoriasis, severe asthma, ulcerative colitis, and crohn's disease. Cortisol exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cortisol has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in urine, saliva, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, cortisol is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Cortisol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Cortisol can be biosynthesized from 21-deoxycortisol through the action of the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase. In addition, Cortisol can be biosynthesized from cortexolone through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 11B1. In humans, cortisol is involved in the corticotropin activation OF cortisol production pathway and the steroidogenesis pathway. Cortisol is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include adrenal hyperplasia type 3 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (clah) or lipoid cah pathway, 21-hydroxylase deficiency (cyp21), and 3-Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency.
Cortisol ; HMDB00063 Cortisol, also known as epicort or cortril, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 21-hydroxysteroids. These are steroids carrying a hydroxyl group at the 21-position of the steroid backbone. Thus, cortisol is considered to be a steroid lipid molecule. Cortisol is a drug which is used for the relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses. also used to treat endocrine (hormonal) disorders (adrenal insufficiency, addisons disease). it is also used to treat many immune and allergic disorders, such as arthritis, lupus, severe psoriasis, severe asthma, ulcerative colitis, and crohn's disease. Cortisol exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cortisol has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in urine, saliva, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, cortisol is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Cortisol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Cortisol can be biosynthesized from 21-deoxycortisol through the action of the enzyme steroid 21-hydroxylase. In addition, Cortisol can be biosynthesized from cortexolone through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 11B1. In humans, cortisol is involved in the corticotropin activation OF cortisol production pathway and the steroidogenesis pathway. Cortisol is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include adrenal hyperplasia type 3 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (clah) or lipoid cah pathway, 21-hydroxylase deficiency (cyp21), and 3-Beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency.
Cortisone ; HMDB0002802 Cortisone, also known as cortef or locoid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 21-hydroxysteroids. These are steroids carrying a hydroxyl group at the 21-position of the steroid backbone. Thus, cortisone is considered to be a steroid lipid molecule. Cortisone exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cortisone has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, cortisone is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), endoplasmic reticulum, myelin sheath and cytoplasm. Cortisone participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Cortisone can be biosynthesized from 17a,21-dihydroxy-5b-pregnane-3,11,20-trione through its interaction with the enzyme 3-oxo-5-beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenase. In addition, Cortisone, nadph, and hydrogen ion can be biosynthesized from cortisol and nadp through the action of the enzyme corticosteroid 11-beta-dehydrogenase isozyme 2. In humans, cortisone is involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. Cortisone is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include 21-hydroxylase deficiency (cyp21), adrenal hyperplasia type 5 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 17 Alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, corticosterone methyl oxidase I deficiency (cmo I), and adrenal hyperplasia type 3 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.
Cortisone ; HMDB02802 Cortisone, also known as cortef or locoid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 21-hydroxysteroids. These are steroids carrying a hydroxyl group at the 21-position of the steroid backbone. Thus, cortisone is considered to be a steroid lipid molecule. Cortisone exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Cortisone has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, cortisone is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), endoplasmic reticulum, myelin sheath and cytoplasm. Cortisone participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Cortisone can be biosynthesized from 17a,21-dihydroxy-5b-pregnane-3,11,20-trione through its interaction with the enzyme 3-oxo-5-beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenase. In addition, Cortisone, nadph, and hydrogen ion can be biosynthesized from cortisol and nadp through the action of the enzyme corticosteroid 11-beta-dehydrogenase isozyme 2. In humans, cortisone is involved in the steroidogenesis pathway. Cortisone is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include 21-hydroxylase deficiency (cyp21), adrenal hyperplasia type 5 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 17 Alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, corticosterone methyl oxidase I deficiency (cmo I), and adrenal hyperplasia type 3 or congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.
Cotinine ; HMDB0001046 Cotinine, also known as (S)-cotinine or cotininum, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrrolidinylpyridines. Pyrrolidinylpyridines are compounds containing a pyrrolidinylpyridine ring system, which consists of a pyrrolidine ring linked to a pyridine ring. Cotinine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a strong basic compound (based on its pKa). Cotinine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in urine, saliva, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, cotinine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Cotinine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Cotinine can be biosynthesized from nicotine imine; which is mediated by the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In addition, Cotinine can be converted into hydroxycotinine through the action of the enzyme cytochrome P450 2A6. In humans, cotinine is involved in the nicotine action pathway and the nicotine metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, cotinine can be found in a number of food items such as onion-family vegetables, rowanberry, ginger, and swamp cabbage. This makes cotinine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Cotinine is a potentially toxic compound.
Cotinine ; HMDB01046 Cotinine, also known as (S)-cotinine or cotininum, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrrolidinylpyridines. Pyrrolidinylpyridines are compounds containing a pyrrolidinylpyridine ring system, which consists of a pyrrolidine ring linked to a pyridine ring. Cotinine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a strong basic compound (based on its pKa). Cotinine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in urine, saliva, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, cotinine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Cotinine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Cotinine can be biosynthesized from nicotine imine; which is mediated by the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In addition, Cotinine can be converted into hydroxycotinine through the action of the enzyme cytochrome P450 2A6. In humans, cotinine is involved in the nicotine action pathway and the nicotine metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, cotinine can be found in a number of food items such as onion-family vegetables, rowanberry, ginger, and swamp cabbage. This makes cotinine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Cotinine is a potentially toxic compound.
Creatine ; HMDB0000064 Creatine, also known as cosmocair C 100 or krebiozon, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon), or a derivative thereof. Creatine is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Creatine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Creatine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, blood, saliva, and breast milk. Within the cell, creatine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and myelin sheath. Creatine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, S-Adenosylmethionine and creatine can be biosynthesized from guanidoacetic acid and S-adenosylhomocysteine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. In addition, S-Adenosylhomocysteine and creatine can be biosynthesized from S-adenosylmethionine and guanidoacetic acid through the action of the enzyme guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. In humans, creatine is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway and the arginine and proline metabolism pathway. Creatine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency, and the hyperprolinemia type I pathway. Creatine is a potentially toxic compound. Creatine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as rhabdomyolysis, cirrhosis, cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome 3, and schizophrenia; creatine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hypermethioninemia.
Creatine ; HMDB00064 Creatine, also known as cosmocair C 100 or krebiozon, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon), or a derivative thereof. Creatine is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Creatine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Creatine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, blood, saliva, and breast milk. Within the cell, creatine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and myelin sheath. Creatine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, S-Adenosylmethionine and creatine can be biosynthesized from guanidoacetic acid and S-adenosylhomocysteine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. In addition, S-Adenosylhomocysteine and creatine can be biosynthesized from S-adenosylmethionine and guanidoacetic acid through the action of the enzyme guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. In humans, creatine is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway and the arginine and proline metabolism pathway. Creatine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency, and the hyperprolinemia type I pathway. Creatine is a potentially toxic compound. Creatine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as rhabdomyolysis, cirrhosis, cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome 3, and schizophrenia; creatine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hypermethioninemia.
Creatinine ; HMDB0000562 Creatinine, also known as krebiozen, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon), or a derivative thereof. Creatinine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Creatinine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, blood, urine, and feces. Within the cell, creatinine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Creatinine can be biosynthesized from creatine. Outside of the human body, creatinine can be found in a number of food items such as annual wild rice, pepper (c. frutescens), prunus (cherry, plum), and kumquat. This makes creatinine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Creatinine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as hypoparathyroidism-retardation-dysmorphism syndrome, familial partial lipodystrophy, long-chain fatty acids, defect in transport of, and lipodystrophy, congenital generalized; creatinine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including phenylketonuria.
Creatinine ; HMDB00562 Creatinine, also known as krebiozen, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon), or a derivative thereof. Creatinine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Creatinine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, blood, urine, and feces. Within the cell, creatinine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Creatinine can be biosynthesized from creatine. Outside of the human body, creatinine can be found in a number of food items such as annual wild rice, pepper (c. frutescens), prunus (cherry, plum), and kumquat. This makes creatinine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Creatinine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as hypoparathyroidism-retardation-dysmorphism syndrome, familial partial lipodystrophy, long-chain fatty acids, defect in transport of, and lipodystrophy, congenital generalized; creatinine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including phenylketonuria.
Cysteineglutathione disulfide ; HMDB0000656 Cysteineglutathione disulfide, also known as cyssg or nereithione, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as oligopeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of between three and ten alpha-amino acids joined by peptide bonds. Cysteineglutathione disulfide exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Cysteineglutathione disulfide has been primarily detected in saliva. Within the cell, cysteineglutathione disulfide is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
Cysteinylglycine ; HMDB0000078 L-Cysteinylglycine, also known as cys-gly or CG, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. L-Cysteinylglycine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Cysteinylglycine has been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-cysteinylglycine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. L-Cysteinylglycine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, L-cysteinylglycine is involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway. L-Cysteinylglycine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include Gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase deficiency, glutathione synthetase deficiency, 5-oxoprolinase deficiency, and Gamma-glutamyltransferase deficiency. L-Cysteinylglycine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including phenylketonuria.
Cytidine ; HMDB0000089 Cytarabine, also known as ara-C or cytosar-u, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrimidine nucleosides. Pyrimidine nucleosides are compounds comprising a pyrimidine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. Cytarabine is a drug which is used for the treatment of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia and blast phase of chronic myelocytic leukemia. Cytarabine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Cytarabine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, cytarabine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Cytarabine can be biosynthesized from cytosine. Outside of the human body, cytarabine can be found in a number of food items such as guava, root vegetables, sweet orange, and herbs and spices. This makes cytarabine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Cytarabine is a potentially toxic compound.
Cytosine ; HMDB0000630 Cytosine, also known as C, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrimidones. Pyrimidones are compounds that contain a pyrimidine ring, which bears a ketone. Pyrimidine is a 6-membered ring consisting of four carbon atoms and two nitrogen centers at the 1- and 3- ring positions. Cytosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Cytosine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and plasma. Cytosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, cytosine can be found in a number of food items such as new zealand spinach, medlar, french plantain, and hickory nut. This makes cytosine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Cytosine ; HMDB00630 Cytosine, also known as C, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrimidones. Pyrimidones are compounds that contain a pyrimidine ring, which bears a ketone. Pyrimidine is a 6-membered ring consisting of four carbon atoms and two nitrogen centers at the 1- and 3- ring positions. Cytosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Cytosine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and plasma. Cytosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, cytosine can be found in a number of food items such as new zealand spinach, medlar, french plantain, and hickory nut. This makes cytosine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
D-alpha-Aminobutyric acid ; HMDB0000650 , also known as D-2-aminobutyrate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as d-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the D-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, can be found in a number of food items such as common pea, pulses, green bean, and nuts. This makes a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
D-alpha-Aminobutyric acid ; HMDB00650 , also known as D-2-aminobutyrate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as d-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the D-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, can be found in a number of food items such as common pea, pulses, green bean, and nuts. This makes a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
D-Glucose ; HMDB0000122 D-Glucose, also known as dextrose or D-GLC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hexoses. These are monosaccharides in which the sugar unit is a is a six-carbon containing moeity. D-Glucose exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Glucose has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, D-glucose is primarily located in the lysosome, endoplasmic reticulum, golgi and myelin sheath. D-Glucose exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. D-Glucose participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, D-Glucose can be biosynthesized from glucose 1-phosphate through the action of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase. Furthermore, D-Glucose and uridine diphosphategalactose can be converted into uridine 5'-diphosphate and Alpha-lactose through the action of the enzyme lactose synthase. Furthermore, Ceramide (D18:1/18:0) and D-glucose can be biosynthesized from glucosylceramide and water; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glucosylceramidase. Finally, D-Glucose can be converted into glucose 6-phosphate; which is mediated by the enzyme hexokinase-2. In humans, D-glucose is involved in the metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) pathway, the triosephosphate isomerase pathway, the gliclazide action pathway, and the pancreas function pathway. D-Glucose is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the congenital disorder OF glycosylation CDG-iid pathway, the transfer OF acetyl groups into mitochondria pathway, the gaucher disease pathway, and the fanconi-bickel syndrome pathway. D-Glucose is a potentially toxic compound. D-Glucose has been found to be associated with several diseases known as hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 1, HHF1 and diabetes mellitus type 2; d-glucose has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including 3-methyl-crotonyl-glycinuria, primary hypomagnesemia, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.
D-Glucose ; HMDB00122 D-Glucose, also known as dextrose or D-GLC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hexoses. These are monosaccharides in which the sugar unit is a is a six-carbon containing moeity. D-Glucose exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Glucose has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, D-glucose is primarily located in the lysosome, endoplasmic reticulum, golgi and myelin sheath. D-Glucose exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. D-Glucose participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, D-Glucose can be biosynthesized from glucose 1-phosphate through the action of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase. Furthermore, D-Glucose and uridine diphosphategalactose can be converted into uridine 5'-diphosphate and Alpha-lactose through the action of the enzyme lactose synthase. Furthermore, Ceramide (D18:1/18:0) and D-glucose can be biosynthesized from glucosylceramide and water; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glucosylceramidase. Finally, D-Glucose can be converted into glucose 6-phosphate; which is mediated by the enzyme hexokinase-2. In humans, D-glucose is involved in the metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) pathway, the triosephosphate isomerase pathway, the gliclazide action pathway, and the pancreas function pathway. D-Glucose is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the congenital disorder OF glycosylation CDG-iid pathway, the transfer OF acetyl groups into mitochondria pathway, the gaucher disease pathway, and the fanconi-bickel syndrome pathway. D-Glucose is a potentially toxic compound. D-Glucose has been found to be associated with several diseases known as hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, familial, 1, HHF1 and diabetes mellitus type 2; d-glucose has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including 3-methyl-crotonyl-glycinuria, primary hypomagnesemia, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.
D-Glucuronic acid ; HMDB0000127 D-Glucuronic acid, also known as glcaa or D-glucuronate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glucuronic acid derivatives. Glucuronic acid derivatives are compounds containing a glucuronic acid moiety (or a derivative), which consists of a glucose moiety with the C6 carbon oxidized to a carboxylic acid. D-Glucuronic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Glucuronic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, D-glucuronic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, lysosome and endoplasmic reticulum. D-Glucuronic acid can be biosynthesized from isovalerylglucuronide through the action of the enzyme Beta-glucuronidase. In humans, D-glucuronic acid is involved in the inositol metabolism pathway and the starch and sucrose metabolism pathway. D-Glucuronic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the glycogenosis, type iii. cori disease, debrancher glycogenosis pathway, sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, the mucopolysaccharidosis vi. sly syndrome pathway, and the glycogenosis, type vi. hers disease pathway.
D-Glucuronic acid ; HMDB00127 D-Glucuronic acid, also known as glcaa or D-glucuronate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glucuronic acid derivatives. Glucuronic acid derivatives are compounds containing a glucuronic acid moiety (or a derivative), which consists of a glucose moiety with the C6 carbon oxidized to a carboxylic acid. D-Glucuronic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Glucuronic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, D-glucuronic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, lysosome and endoplasmic reticulum. D-Glucuronic acid can be biosynthesized from isovalerylglucuronide through the action of the enzyme Beta-glucuronidase. In humans, D-glucuronic acid is involved in the inositol metabolism pathway and the starch and sucrose metabolism pathway. D-Glucuronic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the glycogenosis, type iii. cori disease, debrancher glycogenosis pathway, sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, the mucopolysaccharidosis vi. sly syndrome pathway, and the glycogenosis, type vi. hers disease pathway.
D-Leucic acid ; HMDB0000624 D-Leucic acid, also known as D-leucate or delta-leucic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxy fatty acids. These are fatty acids in which the chain bears a hydroxyl group. D-Leucic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Leucic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, D-leucic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. D-Leucic acid can be converted into (R)-2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoyl-CoA.
D-Maltose ; HMDB0000163 D-Maltose, also known as alpha-malt sugar or finetose F, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as o-glycosyl compounds. These are glycoside in which a sugar group is bonded through one carbon to another group via a O-glycosidic bond. D-Maltose exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Maltose has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and sweat. Within the cell, D-maltose is primarily located in the cytoplasm and lysosome. D-Maltose participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, D-Maltose can be converted into Alpha-D-glucose; which is mediated by the enzyme maltase-glucoamylase, intestinal. In addition, D-Maltose can be converted into Alpha-D-glucose through its interaction with the enzyme glycogen debranching enzyme. In humans, D-maltose is involved in the starch and sucrose metabolism pathway. D-Maltose is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the glycogenosis, type iv. amylopectinosis, anderson disease pathway, glycogen synthetase deficiency, sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, and the glycogenosis, type vi. hers disease pathway.
D-Mannose ; HMDB0000169 D-Mannose, also known as mannopyranose or carubinose, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hexoses. These are monosaccharides in which the sugar unit is a is a six-carbon containing moeity. D-Mannose exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Mannose has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, feces, and urine. D-Mannose can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome, and cytoplasm. D-Mannose exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. D-Mannose participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, D-Mannose can be converted into mannose 6-phosphate through the action of the enzyme hexokinase-1. In addition, D-Galactose and D-mannose can be converted into epimelibiose; which is mediated by the enzyme Alpha-galactosidase a. In humans, D-mannose is involved in the fructose and mannose degradation pathway, the galactose metabolism pathway, and the fructose intolerance, hereditary pathway. D-Mannose is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the fructosuria pathway and the galactosemia pathway.
D-Ribose ; HMDB0000283 D-Ribose, also known as ribose, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pentoses. These are monosaccharides in which the carbohydrate moiety contains five carbon atoms. D-Ribose exists as a solid, very soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Ribose has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, urine, saliva, and cerebrospinal fluid. D-Ribose exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. D-Ribose can be converted into D-ribose 5-phosphate through its interaction with the enzyme ribokinase. In humans, D-ribose is involved in the pentose phosphate pathway. D-Ribose is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, transaldolase deficiency, and ribose-5-phosphate isomerase deficiency. Outside of the human body, D-ribose can be found in a number of food items such as fruits, other soy product, chinese mustard, and cucurbita (gourd). This makes D-ribose a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
D-Threitol ; HMDB0004136 D-Threitol, also known as D-threo-tetritol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar alcohols. These are hydrogenated forms of carbohydrate in which the carbonyl group (aldehyde or ketone, reducing sugar) has been reduced to a primary or secondary hydroxyl group. D-Threitol is very soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Threitol has been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. D-Threitol has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including ribose-5-phosphate isomerase deficiency.
D-Threitol ; HMDB04136 D-Threitol, also known as D-threo-tetritol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar alcohols. These are hydrogenated forms of carbohydrate in which the carbonyl group (aldehyde or ketone, reducing sugar) has been reduced to a primary or secondary hydroxyl group. D-Threitol is very soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Threitol has been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. D-Threitol has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including ribose-5-phosphate isomerase deficiency.
D-Urobilin ; HMDB0004161 D-Urobilin belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. D-Urobilin is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. D-Urobilin has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine.
D-Urobilinogen ; HMDB0004158 D-Urobilinogen belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. D-Urobilinogen is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. D-Urobilinogen has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, D-urobilinogen is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). D-Urobilinogen exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, D-urobilinogen is involved in the porphyrin metabolism pathway. D-Urobilinogen is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the acute intermittent porphyria pathway, congenital erythropoietic porphyria (cep) or gunther disease pathway, the hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) pathway, and the porphyria variegata (PV) pathway.
D-Urobilinogen ; HMDB04158 D-Urobilinogen belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. D-Urobilinogen is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. D-Urobilinogen has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, D-urobilinogen is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). D-Urobilinogen exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, D-urobilinogen is involved in the porphyrin metabolism pathway. D-Urobilinogen is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the acute intermittent porphyria pathway, congenital erythropoietic porphyria (cep) or gunther disease pathway, the hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) pathway, and the porphyria variegata (PV) pathway.
D-Xylose ; HMDB0000098 D-Xylose, also known as xylose or xylopyranose, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pentoses. These are monosaccharides in which the carbohydrate moiety contains five carbon atoms. D-Xylose exists as a solid, very soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Xylose has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, D-xylose is primarily located in the cytoplasm and lysosome. Outside of the human body, D-xylose can be found in flaxseed. This makes D-xylose a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. D-Xylose is a potentially toxic compound.
Decanoylcarnitine ; HMDB0000651 Decanoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, decanoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Decanoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Decanoylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, decanoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Decanoylcarnitine has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease and glutaric aciduria II.
Decanoylcarnitine ; HMDB00651 Decanoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, decanoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Decanoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Decanoylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, decanoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Decanoylcarnitine has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease and glutaric aciduria II.
Delta-Hexanolactone ; HMDB0000453 Delta-Hexanolactone, also known as -hexanolactone or epsilon-caprolactone, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as delta valerolactones. These are cyclic organic compounds containing an oxan-2- one moiety. Delta-Hexanolactone is soluble (in water) and an extremely weak basic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, Delta-hexanolactone is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
Deoxycholic acid ; HMDB0000626 Deoxycholic acid, also known as deoxycholate or acid, deoxycholic, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Deoxycholic acid is a drug which is used for improvement in appearance of moderate to severe fullness associated with submental fat in adults. . Deoxycholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Deoxycholic acid has been found in human hepatic tissue and intestine tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, deoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, deoxycholic acid is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Deoxycholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, the zellweger syndrome pathway, and 27-hydroxylase deficiency.
Deoxycholic acid ; HMDB00626 Deoxycholic acid, also known as deoxycholate or acid, deoxycholic, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Deoxycholic acid is a drug which is used for improvement in appearance of moderate to severe fullness associated with submental fat in adults. . Deoxycholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Deoxycholic acid has been found in human hepatic tissue and intestine tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, deoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, deoxycholic acid is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Deoxycholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, the zellweger syndrome pathway, and 27-hydroxylase deficiency.
Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate ; HMDB0000631 Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate, also known as glycodeoxycholate or deoxycholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate has been found in human hepatic tissue and prostate tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the zellweger syndrome pathway.
Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate ; HMDB00631 Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate, also known as glycodeoxycholate or deoxycholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate has been found in human hepatic tissue and prostate tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Deoxycholic acid glycine conjugate is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the zellweger syndrome pathway.
Deoxyuridine ; HMDB0000012 Deoxyuridine, also known as dU, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrimidine 2'-deoxyribonucleosides. Pyrimidine 2'-deoxyribonucleosides are compounds consisting of a pyrimidine linked to a ribose which lacks a hydroxyl group at position 2. Deoxyuridine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Deoxyuridine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, deoxyuridine is primarily located in the mitochondria and nucleus. Deoxyuridine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Deoxyuridine can be biosynthesized from deoxycytidine through the action of the enzyme cytidine deaminase. In addition, Deoxyuridine can be converted into uracil and deoxyribose 1-phosphate through its interaction with the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase. In humans, deoxyuridine is involved in the pyrimidine metabolism pathway. Deoxyuridine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the mngie (mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy) pathway, UMP synthase deficiency (orotic aciduria), Beta ureidopropionase deficiency, and dihydropyrimidinase deficiency.
DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) ; HMDB0007098 DG(16:0/16:0/0:0), also known as DAG(16:0/16:0) or diacylglycerol(32:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/16:0) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) and myristoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/16:0/14:1(9Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/16:0) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) and palmityl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/16:0/16:0)[iso]; which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is involved in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway, phospholipid biosynthesis pathway, the D-glyceric acidura pathway, and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/16:0) pathway. DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:0/22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:0/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:0/14:1(9Z)) pathway.
DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) ; HMDB07098 DG(16:0/16:0/0:0), also known as DAG(16:0/16:0) or diacylglycerol(32:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/16:0) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) and myristoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/16:0/14:1(9Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/16:0) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) and palmityl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/16:0/16:0)[iso]; which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is involved in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway, phospholipid biosynthesis pathway, the D-glyceric acidura pathway, and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/16:0) pathway. DG(16:0/16:0/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:0/22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:0/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:0/14:1(9Z)) pathway.
DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007099 DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as diacylglycerol or DAG(16:0/16:1), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). In humans, DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:0/16:1(9Z)) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/16:1(9Z)) pathway. DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/20:1(11Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/16:0) pathway.
DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07099 DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as diacylglycerol or DAG(16:0/16:1), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). In humans, DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:0/16:1(9Z)) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/16:1(9Z)) pathway. DG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/20:1(11Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/16:1(9Z)/16:0) pathway.
DG(16:0/18:0/0:0) ; HMDB0007100 DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2], also known as DAG(16:0/18:0) or diacylglycerol(16:0/18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). In humans, DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/18:0) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:0/18:0) pathway. DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:0/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:0/18:1(9Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:0/18:1(11Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:0/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) pathway.
DG(16:0/18:0/0:0) ; HMDB07100 DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2], also known as DAG(16:0/18:0) or diacylglycerol(16:0/18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). In humans, DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/18:0) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:0/18:0) pathway. DG(16:0/18:0/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:0/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:0/18:1(9Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:0/18:1(11Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:0/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) pathway.
DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007102 DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as diacylglycerol or DAG(16:0/18:1), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/18:1(9Z)) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and myristoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/14:1(9Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/18:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and palmityl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/16:0) through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/18:1(9Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and palmitoleyl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/16:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:0/18:1(9Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/18:1(9Z)) pathway, and the phosphatidylinositol phosphate metabolism pathway. DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/24:0) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/14:1(9Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/24:1(15Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/20:0) pathway.
DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07102 DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as diacylglycerol or DAG(16:0/18:1), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/18:1(9Z)) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and myristoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/14:1(9Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/18:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and palmityl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/16:0) through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(16:0/18:1(9Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and palmitoleyl-CoA can be converted into TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/16:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:0/18:1(9Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/18:1(9Z)) pathway, and the phosphatidylinositol phosphate metabolism pathway. DG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/24:0) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/14:1(9Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/24:1(15Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:1(9Z)/20:0) pathway.
DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007103 DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as diacylglycerol(16:0/18:2) or DAG(16:0/18:2), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway. DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/16:0) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/14:1(9Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/16:1(9Z)) pathway.
DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07103 DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as diacylglycerol(16:0/18:2) or DAG(16:0/18:2), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway. DG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/16:0) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/14:1(9Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)/16:1(9Z)) pathway.
DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007132 DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as DAG(16:1N7/18:2N6) or diacylglycerol(16:1/18:2), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway. DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:1(11Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:1(13Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway.
DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07132 DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as DAG(16:1N7/18:2N6) or diacylglycerol(16:1/18:2), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway. DG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:1(11Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:1(13Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(16:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway.
DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) ; HMDB0007158 DG(18:0/18:0/0:0), also known as diacyl glycerol or DAG(18:0/18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:0/18:0) through its interaction with the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) and myristoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:0/18:0/14:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:0/18:0) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) and palmitoleyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:0/18:0/16:1(9Z)) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:0/18:0); which is catalyzed by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) and stearoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:0/18:0/18:0); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:0/18:0) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:0/18:0) pathway. DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/18:0/22:1(13Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/18:0/18:1(11Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/18:0/18:0) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/18:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway.
DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) ; HMDB07158 DG(18:0/18:0/0:0), also known as diacyl glycerol or DAG(18:0/18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:0/18:0) through its interaction with the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) and myristoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:0/18:0/14:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:0/18:0) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) and palmitoleyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:0/18:0/16:1(9Z)) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:0/18:0); which is catalyzed by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) and stearoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:0/18:0/18:0); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:0/18:0) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:0/18:0) pathway. DG(18:0/18:0/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/18:0/22:1(13Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/18:0/18:1(11Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/18:0/18:0) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/18:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway.
DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007170 DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as diacylglycerol(18:0/20:4) or DAG(18:0/20:4), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). In humans, DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway, the activation OF PKC through g protein coupled receptor pathway, and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway. DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/16:1(9Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway.
DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07170 DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as diacylglycerol(18:0/20:4) or DAG(18:0/20:4), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). In humans, DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway, the activation OF PKC through g protein coupled receptor pathway, and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway. DG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/16:1(9Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:0/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway.
DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007199 DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), also known as DG(18:1/20:4) or diacylglycerol(38:5), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) and cis-vaccenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(11Z)) through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) and oleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(9Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) and linoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway. DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) pathway.
DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07199 DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), also known as DG(18:1/20:4) or diacylglycerol(38:5), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) and cis-vaccenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(11Z)) through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) and oleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(9Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) and linoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway. DG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) pathway.
DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) ; HMDB0007216 DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0), also known as diacylglycerol or DAG(18:1/18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:0); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) and oleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/18:1(9Z)) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:0); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) and linoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:0) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) and gamma-linolenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(9Z)/18:0) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:1(9Z)/18:0) pathway. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway.
DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) ; HMDB07216 DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0), also known as diacylglycerol or DAG(18:1/18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:0); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) and oleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/18:1(9Z)) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:0); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) and linoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/18:2(9Z,12Z)) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:0) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) and gamma-linolenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(9Z)/18:0) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:1(9Z)/18:0) pathway. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:0/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway.
DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007218 DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as sn-1,2-dioleoylglycerol or sn-1,2-diolein, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and oleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z))[iso] through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and linoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z))[iso3]; which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and gamma-linolenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z))[iso6] through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/24:1(15Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway.
DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07218 DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as sn-1,2-dioleoylglycerol or sn-1,2-diolein, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2-diacylglycerols. These are diacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at positions 1 and 2. Thus, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and oleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z))[iso] through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and linoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z))[iso3]; which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)) through the action of the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) and gamma-linolenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z))[iso6] through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/24:1(15Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:1(9Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway.
DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007219 DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as DAG(18:1/18:2) or diacylglycerol(18:1/18:2), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway.
DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07219 DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2], also known as DAG(18:1/18:2) or diacylglycerol(18:1/18:2), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway. DG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)[iso2] is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(9Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) pathway.
DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0007248 DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0), also known as DAG(18:2/18:2) or DAG(18:2OMEGA6/18:2OMEGA6), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) and linoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) and gamma-linolenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z))[iso3]; which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) and alpha-linolenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z))[iso3] through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway. DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:2(13Z,16Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway.
DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB07248 DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0), also known as DAG(18:2/18:2) or DAG(18:2OMEGA6/18:2OMEGA6), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a diradylglycerol lipid molecule. DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) and linoleoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Furthermore, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) and gamma-linolenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z))[iso3]; which is mediated by the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. Furthermore, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from PA(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)); which is mediated by the enzyme phosphatidate phosphatase. Finally, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) and alpha-linolenoyl-CoA can be converted into TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z))[iso3] through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase. In humans, DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is involved in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)) pathway. DG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/22:2(13Z,16Z)) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)) pathway.
Dihomolinoleic acid ; HMDB0061864 , also known as 20:2n6 or dihomolinoleate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. can be converted into 1-octadecanoyl-2-[(10Z,12Z)-octadecadienoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine.
Dihydrothymine ; HMDB0000079 Dihydrothymine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydropyrimidines. Hydropyrimidines are compounds containing a hydrogenated pyrimidine ring (i.e. containing less than the maximum number of double bonds.). Dihydrothymine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Dihydrothymine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, dihydrothymine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Dihydrothymine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Dihydrothymine can be biosynthesized from thymine through the action of the enzyme dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase [nadp(+)]. In addition, Dihydrothymine can be converted into ureidoisobutyric acid through the action of the enzyme dihydropyrimidinase. In humans, dihydrothymine is involved in the pyrimidine metabolism pathway. Dihydrothymine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include UMP synthase deficiency (orotic aciduria), dihydropyrimidinase deficiency, Beta ureidopropionase deficiency, and the mngie (mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy) pathway. Outside of the human body, dihydrothymine can be found in a number of food items such as broad bean, millet, tronchuda cabbage, and alaska wild rhubarb. This makes dihydrothymine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Dihydrothymine is a potentially toxic compound.
Dihydrouracil ; HMDB0000076 Dihydrouracil belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrimidones. Pyrimidones are compounds that contain a pyrimidine ring, which bears a ketone. Pyrimidine is a 6-membered ring consisting of four carbon atoms and two nitrogen centers at the 1- and 3- ring positions. Dihydrouracil exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Dihydrouracil has been found in human prostate, liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, dihydrouracil is primarily located in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Dihydrouracil participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Dihydrouracil can be biosynthesized from uracil; which is mediated by the enzyme dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase [nadp(+)]. Furthermore, Dihydrouracil can be converted into ureidopropionic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme dihydropyrimidinase. Furthermore, Dihydrouracil can be converted into ureidopropionic acid through its interaction with the enzyme dihydropyrimidinase. Finally, Dihydrouracil can be converted into uracil through its interaction with the enzyme dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase [nadp(+)]. In humans, dihydrouracil is involved in the pyrimidine metabolism pathway and the Beta-alanine metabolism pathway. Dihydrouracil is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the mngie (mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy) pathway, ureidopropionase deficiency, gaba-transaminase deficiency, and Beta ureidopropionase deficiency. Outside of the human body, dihydrouracil can be found in a number of food items such as roman camomile, hyssop, tree fern, and brussel sprouts. This makes dihydrouracil a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Dihydrouracil is a potentially toxic compound.
Dimethylglycine ; HMDB0000092 Dimethylglycine, also known as N-methylsarcosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Dimethylglycine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Dimethylglycine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, dimethylglycine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Dimethylglycine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Dimethylglycine can be converted into formaldehyde and sarcosine; which is mediated by the enzyme dimethylglycine dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Dimethylglycine and L-methionine can be biosynthesized from betaine and homocysteine through the action of the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Furthermore, Dimethylglycine and L-methionine can be biosynthesized from betaine and homocysteine through its interaction with the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Finally, Dimethylglycine and L-methionine can be biosynthesized from betaine and homocysteine; which is mediated by the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. In humans, dimethylglycine is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, the betaine metabolism pathway, the sarcosine oncometabolite pathway, and the methionine metabolism pathway. Dimethylglycine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency, cystathionine Beta-synthase deficiency, the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway, and the hypermethioninemia pathway.
Dimethylglycine ; HMDB00092 Dimethylglycine, also known as N-methylsarcosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Dimethylglycine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Dimethylglycine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, dimethylglycine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Dimethylglycine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Dimethylglycine can be converted into formaldehyde and sarcosine; which is mediated by the enzyme dimethylglycine dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Dimethylglycine and L-methionine can be biosynthesized from betaine and homocysteine through the action of the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Furthermore, Dimethylglycine and L-methionine can be biosynthesized from betaine and homocysteine through its interaction with the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Finally, Dimethylglycine and L-methionine can be biosynthesized from betaine and homocysteine; which is mediated by the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. In humans, dimethylglycine is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, the betaine metabolism pathway, the sarcosine oncometabolite pathway, and the methionine metabolism pathway. Dimethylglycine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency, cystathionine Beta-synthase deficiency, the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway, and the hypermethioninemia pathway.
Dimethylguanidino valeric acid ; HMDB0240212 Dimethylguanidino valeric acid or DMGV is a product formed from the transamination of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) via the enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2). This pathway is involved in nitric oxide regulation. DMGV has been detected in both blood and urine (PMID:  21945966 ). More recently DMGV has been identified as an independent plasma biomarker of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Furthermore, plasma DMGV levels are correlated with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Plasma DMGV levels have also been found to decline in parallel with improvements in post-procedure cardiometabolic parameters. Plasma DMGV levels have been shown to be able to predict the development of type 2 diabetes up to 12 years before disease onset (PMID: 29083323). Baseline plasma levels of DMGV have been shown to be positively associated with body fat percentage, abdominal visceral fat, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL), and triglycerides. Plasma levels of DMGV are inversely associated with insulin sensitivity, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein size, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL). Overall, DMGV is associated with partial resistance to metabolic health benefits of regular exercise (PMID: 31166569).
DL-2-Aminooctanoic acid ; HMDB0000991 DL-2-Amino-octanoic acid, also known as a-aminocaprylate or alpha-aminocaprylic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). DL-2-Amino-octanoic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). DL-2-Amino-octanoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, DL-2-amino-octanoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
DL-2-Aminooctanoic acid ; HMDB00991 DL-2-Amino-octanoic acid, also known as a-aminocaprylate or alpha-aminocaprylic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). DL-2-Amino-octanoic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). DL-2-Amino-octanoic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, DL-2-amino-octanoic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
Docosadienoate (22:2n6) ; HMDB0061714 Docosadienoate (22:2n6), also known as 13,16-docosadienoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Docosadienoate (22:2n6) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Docosadienoate (22:2n6) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, docosadienoate (22:2n6) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome.
Docosahexaenoic acid ; HMDB0002183 Dha, also known as doconexent or docosahexaenoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Thus, Dha is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. Dha is a drug which is used as a high-docosahexaenoic acid (dha) oral supplement. . Dha is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Dha has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, Dha is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), myelin sheath and adiposome. In humans, Dha is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway. Dha has been found to be associated with several diseases known as hypertension, thyroid cancer, stroke, and essential hypertension; dha has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Docosahexaenoic acid ; HMDB02183 Dha, also known as doconexent or docosahexaenoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Thus, Dha is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. Dha is a drug which is used as a high-docosahexaenoic acid (dha) oral supplement. . Dha is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Dha has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, Dha is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP), myelin sheath and adiposome. In humans, Dha is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway. Dha has been found to be associated with several diseases known as hypertension, thyroid cancer, stroke, and essential hypertension; dha has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Docosapentaenoic acid (22n-6) ; HMDB0001976 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z), also known as docosapentaenoate (22N-6) or C22:5N-6,9,12,15,18, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Thus, 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) is considered to be a docosanoid lipid molecule. 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) has been found in human adipose tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. In humans, 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway.
Docosapentaenoic acid (22n-6) ; HMDB01976 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z), also known as docosapentaenoate (22N-6) or C22:5N-6,9,12,15,18, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. Thus, 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) is considered to be a docosanoid lipid molecule. 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) has been found in human adipose tissue tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. In humans, 22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z) is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway.
Dodecanedioic acid ; HMDB0000623 Dodecanedioic acid, also known as 1,12-dodecanedioate or 1,10-dicarboxydecane, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Dodecanedioic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Dodecanedioic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, dodecanedioic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Dodecanedioic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, dodecane, 1,12-di-L-ascorbyl dodecanedioate, and O-dodecanedioylcarnitine.
Dodecanedioic acid ; HMDB00623 Dodecanedioic acid, also known as 1,12-dodecanedioate or 1,10-dicarboxydecane, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Dodecanedioic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Dodecanedioic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, dodecanedioic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Dodecanedioic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, dodecane, 1,12-di-L-ascorbyl dodecanedioate, and O-dodecanedioylcarnitine.
Dodecanoic acid ; HMDB0000638 Lauric acid, also known as dodecanoate or dodecanoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Lauric acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Lauric acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and sweat. Within the cell, lauric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Lauric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, lauric acid is involved in the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway, fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, and the adrenoleukodystrophy, X-linked pathway. Lauric acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF medium chain saturated fatty acids pathway and carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency. Outside of the human body, lauric acid can be found in a number of food items such as ginkgo nuts, chinese bayberry, chanterelle, and garden cress. This makes lauric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Lauric acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Dodecanoic acid ; HMDB00638 Lauric acid, also known as dodecanoate or dodecanoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. Lauric acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Lauric acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and sweat. Within the cell, lauric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Lauric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, lauric acid is involved in the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway, fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, and the adrenoleukodystrophy, X-linked pathway. Lauric acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF medium chain saturated fatty acids pathway and carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency. Outside of the human body, lauric acid can be found in a number of food items such as ginkgo nuts, chinese bayberry, chanterelle, and garden cress. This makes lauric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Lauric acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Dodecanoylcarnitine ; HMDB0002250 Dodecanoylcarnitine, also known as lauroylcarnitine or O-C12:0-L-carnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, dodecanoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Dodecanoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Dodecanoylcarnitine has been found in human liver tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, dodecanoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Dodecanoylcarnitine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Dodecanoylcarnitine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease.
Dodecanoylcarnitine ; HMDB02250 Dodecanoylcarnitine, also known as lauroylcarnitine or O-C12:0-L-carnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, dodecanoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Dodecanoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Dodecanoylcarnitine has been found in human liver tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, dodecanoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Dodecanoylcarnitine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Dodecanoylcarnitine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease.
Dopamine 3-O-sulfate ; HMDB0006275 Dopamine 3-O-sulfate, also known as dopamine 3-monosulphate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylsulfates. Phenylsulfates are compounds containing a sulfuric acid group conjugated to a phenyl group. Dopamine 3-O-sulfate exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). Dopamine 3-O-sulfate has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, dopamine 3-O-sulfate is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Dopamine 3-O-sulfate can be converted into dopamine.
Dopamine 4-sulfate ; HMDB0004148 Dopamine 4-sulfate belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylsulfates. Phenylsulfates are compounds containing a sulfuric acid group conjugated to a phenyl group. Dopamine 4-sulfate exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). Dopamine 4-sulfate has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, dopamine 4-sulfate is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Dopamine 4-sulfate can be converted into dopamine.
Ectoine ; HMDB0240650 Ectoine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha-amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Ectoine has been identified in urine (PMID: 22409530).
Eicosadienoic acid ; HMDB0005060 Dihomolinoleic acid, also known as 11,14-eicosadienoate or eicosadienoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Dihomolinoleic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Dihomolinoleic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, dihomolinoleic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Dihomolinoleic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, dihomolinoleic acid can be biosynthesized from arachidic acid. Dihomolinoleic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 1-octadecyl-2-[(11Z,14Z)-eicosadienoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (11Z,14Z)-icosadienoyl-containing glycerolipid, and 1-palmitoyl-2-(11Z,14Z-eicosadienoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine.
Eicosadienoic acid ; HMDB05060 Dihomolinoleic acid, also known as 11,14-eicosadienoate or eicosadienoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Dihomolinoleic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Dihomolinoleic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, dihomolinoleic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Dihomolinoleic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, dihomolinoleic acid can be biosynthesized from arachidic acid. Dihomolinoleic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 1-octadecyl-2-[(11Z,14Z)-eicosadienoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (11Z,14Z)-icosadienoyl-containing glycerolipid, and 1-palmitoyl-2-(11Z,14Z-eicosadienoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine.
Eicosapentaenoic acid ; HMDB0001999 Epa, also known as icosapent or timnodonic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, Epa is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. Epa is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Epa has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and sweat. Within the cell, Epa is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. In humans, Epa is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, Epa can be found in a number of food items such as other bread, poppy, pot marjoram, and broad bean. This makes Epa a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Eicosapentaenoic acid ; HMDB01999 Epa, also known as icosapent or timnodonic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thus, Epa is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. Epa is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Epa has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and sweat. Within the cell, Epa is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. In humans, Epa is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, Epa can be found in a number of food items such as other bread, poppy, pot marjoram, and broad bean. This makes Epa a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Ergothioneine ; HMDB0003045 Ergothioneine, also known as sympectothion, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as histidine and derivatives. Histidine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Ergothioneine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Ergothioneine has been primarily detected in blood. Ergothioneine can be converted into 2-sulfenohercynine and S-methyl-L-ergothioneine.
Erucic acid ; HMDB0002068 cis-Erucic acid, also known as cis-eruate or 22:1omega9, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. cis-Erucic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. cis-Erucic acid has been found in human endocrine gland tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, cis-erucic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. cis-Erucic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, ethyl (13Z)-docosenoate, N-[(13Z)-docosenoyl]-tetradecasphing-4-enine-1-phosphoethanolamine, and N-[(13Z)-docosenoyl]sphing-4-enine-1-phosphocholine. cis-Erucic acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as adrenomyeloneuropathy; cis-erucic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Erucic acid ; HMDB02068 cis-Erucic acid, also known as cis-eruate or 22:1omega9, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as very long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains at least 22 carbon atoms. cis-Erucic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. cis-Erucic acid has been found in human endocrine gland tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, cis-erucic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. cis-Erucic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, ethyl (13Z)-docosenoate, N-[(13Z)-docosenoyl]-tetradecasphing-4-enine-1-phosphoethanolamine, and N-[(13Z)-docosenoyl]sphing-4-enine-1-phosphocholine. cis-Erucic acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as adrenomyeloneuropathy; cis-erucic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Erythritol ; HMDB0002994 D-Threitol, also known as D-threo-tetritol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar alcohols. These are hydrogenated forms of carbohydrate in which the carbonyl group (aldehyde or ketone, reducing sugar) has been reduced to a primary or secondary hydroxyl group. D-Threitol is very soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Threitol has been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. D-Threitol has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including ribose-5-phosphate isomerase deficiency.
Erythronic acid ; HMDB0000613 Erythronic acid, also known as erythronate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar acids and derivatives. Sugar acids and derivatives are compounds containing a saccharide unit which bears a carboxylic acid group. Erythronic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Erythronic acid has been detected in most biofluids, including urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, erythronic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Erythronic acid can be converted into 4-phospho-D-erythronic acid and 3-phospho-D-erythronic acid.
Erythronic acid ; HMDB00613 Erythronic acid, also known as erythronate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar acids and derivatives. Sugar acids and derivatives are compounds containing a saccharide unit which bears a carboxylic acid group. Erythronic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Erythronic acid has been detected in most biofluids, including urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, erythronic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Erythronic acid can be converted into 4-phospho-D-erythronic acid and 3-phospho-D-erythronic acid.
Estriol-3-glucuronide ; HMDB0010335 Estriol-3-glucuronide, also known as estriol 3-glucosiduronate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as steroid glucuronide conjugates. These are sterol lipids containing a glucuronide moiety linked to the steroid skeleton. Thus, estriol-3-glucuronide is considered to be a steroid conjugate lipid molecule. Estriol-3-glucuronide is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Estriol-3-glucuronide has been found in human hepatic tissue, liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, estriol-3-glucuronide is primarily located in the cytoplasm and membrane (predicted from logP).
Ethylmalonic acid ; HMDB0000622 Ethylmalonic acid, also known as ethylmalonate or a-carboxybutyrate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as branched fatty acids. These are fatty acids containing a branched chain. Ethylmalonic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Ethylmalonic acid has been found in human skeletal muscle and prostate tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, ethylmalonic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Ethylmalonic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, ethylmalonic acid can be biosynthesized from malonic acid. Ethylmalonic acid can also be converted into (S)-ethylmalonyl-CoA and (R)-ethylmalonyl-CoA. Ethylmalonic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Ethylmalonic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase deficiency, and anorexia nervosa; ethylmalonic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including ethylmalonic encephalopathy and short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.
Etiocholanolone glucuronide ; HMDB0004484 Etiocholan-3alpha-ol-17-one 3-glucuronide, also known as 3a-hydroxyetiocholan-17-one 3-glucosiduronate or androsterone glucosiduronate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as steroid glucuronide conjugates. These are sterol lipids containing a glucuronide moiety linked to the steroid skeleton. Thus, etiocholan-3alpha-ol-17-one 3-glucuronide is considered to be a steroid conjugate lipid molecule. Etiocholan-3alpha-ol-17-one 3-glucuronide is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Etiocholan-3alpha-ol-17-one 3-glucuronide has been found in human hepatic tissue, liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, etiocholan-3alpha-ol-17-one 3-glucuronide is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and endoplasmic reticulum. In humans, etiocholan-3alpha-ol-17-one 3-glucuronide is involved in the androstenedione metabolism pathway.
Folic acid ; HMDB0000121 Folic acid, also known as folate or vitamin m, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Folic acid is a drug which is used for treatment of folic acid deficiency, megaloblastic anemia and in anemias of nutritional supplements, pregnancy, infancy, or childhood. Folic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Folic acid has been found in human brain, kidney and liver tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Folic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Folic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Folic acid can be biosynthesized from dihydrofolic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase. In addition, Folic acid can be converted into folic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme proton-coupled folate transporter. In humans, folic acid is involved in pterine biosynthesis pathway, the folate malabsorption, hereditary pathway, the folate metabolism pathway, and the methotrexate action pathway. Folic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (MTHFRD). Folic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Folic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as alzheimer's disease, hereditary folate malabsorption, dimethylglycine dehydrogenase deficiency, and rheumatoid arthritis; folic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including folate deficiency.
Folic acid ; HMDB00121 Folic acid, also known as folate or vitamin m, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Folic acid is a drug which is used for treatment of folic acid deficiency, megaloblastic anemia and in anemias of nutritional supplements, pregnancy, infancy, or childhood. Folic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Folic acid has been found in human brain, kidney and liver tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Folic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Folic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Folic acid can be biosynthesized from dihydrofolic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase. In addition, Folic acid can be converted into folic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme proton-coupled folate transporter. In humans, folic acid is involved in pterine biosynthesis pathway, the folate malabsorption, hereditary pathway, the folate metabolism pathway, and the methotrexate action pathway. Folic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (MTHFRD). Folic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Folic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as alzheimer's disease, hereditary folate malabsorption, dimethylglycine dehydrogenase deficiency, and rheumatoid arthritis; folic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including folate deficiency.
Formiminoglutamic acid ; HMDB0000854 Formiminoglutamic acid, also known as N-formimino-L-glutamate or acid, formiminoglutamic, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Formiminoglutamic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Formiminoglutamic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, formiminoglutamic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Formiminoglutamic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Formiminoglutamic acid can be biosynthesized from 4-imidazolone-5-propionic acid through its interaction with the enzyme probable imidazolonepropionase. In addition, Tetrahydrofolic acid and formiminoglutamic acid can be converted into 5-formiminotetrahydrofolic acid and L-glutamic acid through the action of the enzyme formimidoyltransferase-cyclodeaminase. In humans, formiminoglutamic acid is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. Formiminoglutamic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway.
Fumaric acid ; HMDB0000134 Fumaric acid, also known as fumarate or E297, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dicarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Fumaric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Fumaric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, urine, and blood. Within the cell, fumaric acid is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. Fumaric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Fumaric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Fumaric acid can be biosynthesized from L-malic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme fumarate hydratase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Fumaric acid can be biosynthesized from succinic acid through the action of the enzyme succinate dehydrogenase. Furthermore, Fumaric acid and aicar can be biosynthesized from saicar through its interaction with the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase. Finally, Fumaric acid and adenosine monophosphate can be biosynthesized from adenylsuccinic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase. In humans, fumaric acid is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway, the oncogenic action OF succinate pathway, the citric Acid cycle pathway, and the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway. Fumaric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include prolidase deficiency (PD), the alkaptonuria pathway, the tyrosinemia type I pathway, and the hypoacetylaspartia pathway. Outside of the human body, fumaric acid can be found in a number of food items such as common buckwheat, common thyme, garden onion, and jicama. This makes fumaric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Fumaric acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Fumaric acid ; HMDB00134 Fumaric acid, also known as fumarate or E297, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dicarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Fumaric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Fumaric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, urine, and blood. Within the cell, fumaric acid is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. Fumaric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Fumaric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Fumaric acid can be biosynthesized from L-malic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme fumarate hydratase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Fumaric acid can be biosynthesized from succinic acid through the action of the enzyme succinate dehydrogenase. Furthermore, Fumaric acid and aicar can be biosynthesized from saicar through its interaction with the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase. Finally, Fumaric acid and adenosine monophosphate can be biosynthesized from adenylsuccinic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase. In humans, fumaric acid is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway, the oncogenic action OF succinate pathway, the citric Acid cycle pathway, and the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway. Fumaric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include prolidase deficiency (PD), the alkaptonuria pathway, the tyrosinemia type I pathway, and the hypoacetylaspartia pathway. Outside of the human body, fumaric acid can be found in a number of food items such as common buckwheat, common thyme, garden onion, and jicama. This makes fumaric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Fumaric acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Furosemide ; HMDB0001933 Furosemide, also known as frusemide or lasix, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aminobenzenesulfonamides. These are organic compounds containing a benzenesulfonamide moiety with an amine group attached to the benzene ring. Furosemide is a drug which is used for the treatment of edema associated with congestive heart failure, cirrhosis of the liver, and renal disease, including the nephrotic syndrome. also for the treatment of hypertension alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents. Furosemide exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Furosemide has been found in human kidney tissue. Furosemide can be converted into furosemide through its interaction with the enzyme solute carrier family 22 member 6. In humans, furosemide is involved in the furosemide action pathway.
Furosemide ; HMDB01933 Furosemide, also known as frusemide or lasix, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aminobenzenesulfonamides. These are organic compounds containing a benzenesulfonamide moiety with an amine group attached to the benzene ring. Furosemide is a drug which is used for the treatment of edema associated with congestive heart failure, cirrhosis of the liver, and renal disease, including the nephrotic syndrome. also for the treatment of hypertension alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents. Furosemide exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Furosemide has been found in human kidney tissue. Furosemide can be converted into furosemide through its interaction with the enzyme solute carrier family 22 member 6. In humans, furosemide is involved in the furosemide action pathway.
Gabapentin ; HMDB0005015 Gabapentin, also known as neurontin or convalis, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids having a (-NH2) group attached to the gamma carbon atom. Gabapentin is a drug which is used for the management of postherpetic neuralgia in adults and as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial seizures with and without secondary generalization in patients over 12 years of age with epilepsy. Gabapentin exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gabapentin has been found in human brain tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Gabapentin participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, gabapentin can be biosynthesized from gamma-aminobutyric acid. Gabapentin can also be converted into gabapentin enacarbil. Gabapentin is a potentially toxic compound.
Gabapentin ; HMDB05015 Gabapentin, also known as neurontin or convalis, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids having a (-NH2) group attached to the gamma carbon atom. Gabapentin is a drug which is used for the management of postherpetic neuralgia in adults and as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial seizures with and without secondary generalization in patients over 12 years of age with epilepsy. Gabapentin exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gabapentin has been found in human brain tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Gabapentin participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, gabapentin can be biosynthesized from gamma-aminobutyric acid. Gabapentin can also be converted into gabapentin enacarbil. Gabapentin is a potentially toxic compound.
Galactonic acid ; HMDB0000565 Galactonic acid, also known as D-galactonate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are hydroxy acids with a 6 to 12 carbon atoms long side chain. Galactonic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Galactonic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, galactonic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Galactonic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 6-phospho-2-dehydro-3-deoxy-D-galactonic acid, N-acetyl-D-galactosaminic acid, and D-galactono-1,5-lactone.
gamma-Carboxyglutamic acid ; HMDB0041900 Gamma-Carboxyglutamic acid, also known as G-carboxyglutamate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Gamma-Carboxyglutamic acid is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa).
gamma-CEHC ; HMDB0001931 Gamma-Cehc, also known as S-llu-alpha or g-cehc, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-benzopyrans. These are organic aromatic compounds that 1-benzopyran, a bicyclic compound made up of a benzene ring fused to a pyran, so that the oxygen atom is at the 1-position. Gamma-Cehc is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Gamma-Cehc has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, Gamma-cehc is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
gamma-Glutamylalanine ; HMDB0006248 L-gamma-Glutamyl-L-alanine, also known as -glutamylalanine or L-gamma-glu-L-ala, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. L-gamma-Glutamyl-L-alanine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-gamma-Glutamyl-L-alanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, L-gamma-glutamyl-L-alanine is involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway. L-gamma-Glutamyl-L-alanine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include glutathione synthetase deficiency, Gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase deficiency, 5-oxoprolinase deficiency, and Gamma-glutamyltransferase deficiency.
gamma-Glutamylglutamic acid ; HMDB0011737 Gamma-Glutamylglutamic acid, also known as -glutamylglutamate or gamma-L-glu-L-glu, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Gamma-Glutamylglutamic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gamma-Glutamylglutamic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Gamma-Glutamylglutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-glutamic acid.
gamma-Glutamylglycine ; HMDB0011667 Gamma-Glutamylglycine, also known as N-L-glutamylglycine or L-gamma-glu-gly, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Gamma-Glutamylglycine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa).
gamma-Glutamylhistidine ; HMDB0029151 Gamma-Glutamylhistidine, also known as L-gamma-glu-L-his or ge-H dipeptide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Gamma-Glutamylhistidine is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa).
gamma-Glutamylleucine ; HMDB0011171 Gamma-Glutamylleucine, also known as L-gamma-glu-L-leu or -L-glutamyl-L-leucine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Gamma-Glutamylleucine is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gamma-Glutamylleucine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Gamma-Glutamylleucine can be biosynthesized from glutamic acid and leucine. Outside of the human body, Gamma-glutamylleucine can be found in soft-necked garlic. This makes Gamma-glutamylleucine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
gamma-Glutamylmethionine ; HMDB0034367 H-Glu(met-OH)-OH belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. H-Glu(met-OH)-OH exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). H-Glu(met-OH)-OH can be biosynthesized from L-glutamic acid and L-methionine.
gamma-Glutamylphenylalanine ; HMDB0000594 Gamma-Glutamylphenylalanine, also known as gamma-glu-phe or -glu-phe, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylalanine and derivatives. Phenylalanine and derivatives are compounds containing phenylalanine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of phenylalanine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Gamma-Glutamylphenylalanine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Gamma-Glutamylphenylalanine has been found in human kidney tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, Gamma-glutamylphenylalanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
gamma-Glutamylthreonine ; HMDB0029159 Gamma-Glutamylthreonine, also known as L-gamma-glu-L-THR or -L-glutamyl-L-threonine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Gamma-Glutamylthreonine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gamma-Glutamylthreonine has been primarily detected in blood.
gamma-Glutamyltryptophan ; HMDB0029160 Gamma-Glutamyltryptophan, also known as L-gamma-glu-L-TRP or ge-W dipeptide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Gamma-Glutamyltryptophan is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
gamma-Glutamyltyrosine ; HMDB0011741 Gamma-Glutamyltyrosine, also known as glutyrosine or -L-glutamyl-L-tyrosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tyrosine and derivatives. Tyrosine and derivatives are compounds containing tyrosine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of tyrosine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Gamma-Glutamyltyrosine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Gamma-Glutamyltyrosine has been primarily detected in blood. Gamma-Glutamyltyrosine can be biosynthesized from L-glutamic acid and L-tyrosine.
gamma-Glutamylvaline ; HMDB0011172 Gamma-Glutamylvaline, also known as L-gamma-glu-L-val or -L-glutamyl-L-valine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Gamma-Glutamylvaline is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gamma-Glutamylvaline has been primarily detected in blood.
Gamma-Linolenic acid ; HMDB0003073 Gamma-Linolenic acid, also known as 18:3 (N-6) or GLA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Gamma-Linolenic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Gamma-Linolenic acid has been found in human adipose tissue and epidermis tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, Gamma-linolenic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and membrane (predicted from logP). Gamma-Linolenic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Gamma-Linolenic acid can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid desaturase 2. In addition, Gamma-Linolenic acid can be converted into 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid through the action of the enzyme elongation OF very long chain fatty acids protein 5. In humans, Gamma-linolenic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway.
Gamma-Linolenic acid ; HMDB03073 Gamma-Linolenic acid, also known as 18:3 (N-6) or GLA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Gamma-Linolenic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Gamma-Linolenic acid has been found in human adipose tissue and epidermis tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and urine. Within the cell, Gamma-linolenic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and membrane (predicted from logP). Gamma-Linolenic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Gamma-Linolenic acid can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid desaturase 2. In addition, Gamma-Linolenic acid can be converted into 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid through the action of the enzyme elongation OF very long chain fatty acids protein 5. In humans, Gamma-linolenic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway.
Gentisic acid ; HMDB0000152 Gentisic acid, also known as gentisate or 2,5-dioxybenzoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. Hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives are compounds containing a hydroxybenzoic acid (or a derivative), which is a benzene ring bearing a carboxyl and a hydroxyl groups. Gentisic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gentisic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, gentisic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Gentisic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, gentisic acid can be biosynthesized from benzoic acid. Gentisic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, mygalin, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid 5-O-beta-D-glucoside, and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoyl-CoA. Outside of the human body, gentisic acid can be found in a number of food items such as hyssop, common pea, nutmeg, and lemon balm. This makes gentisic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Gentisic acid ; HMDB00152 Gentisic acid, also known as gentisate or 2,5-dioxybenzoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. Hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives are compounds containing a hydroxybenzoic acid (or a derivative), which is a benzene ring bearing a carboxyl and a hydroxyl groups. Gentisic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gentisic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, gentisic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Gentisic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, gentisic acid can be biosynthesized from benzoic acid. Gentisic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, mygalin, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid 5-O-beta-D-glucoside, and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoyl-CoA. Outside of the human body, gentisic acid can be found in a number of food items such as hyssop, common pea, nutmeg, and lemon balm. This makes gentisic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Gluconic acid ; HMDB0000625 Gluconic acid, also known as D-gluconate or dextronic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar acids and derivatives. Sugar acids and derivatives are compounds containing a saccharide unit which bears a carboxylic acid group. Gluconic acid is a drug which is used for use as part of electrolyte supplementation in total parenteral nutrition [fda label]. Gluconic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Gluconic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, gluconic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Gluconic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
Glutamate, gamma-methyl ester ; HMDB0061715 Glutamate, gamma-methyl ester, also known as glutamic acid, -methyl ester, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Glutamate, gamma-methyl ester is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa).
Glutamyllysine ; HMDB0004207 Glutamyllysine, also known as L-glu-L-lys or E-K, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Glutamyllysine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glutamyllysine has been primarily detected in cerebrospinal fluid. Glutamyllysine can be biosynthesized from L-glutamic acid and L-lysine.
Glutamyllysine ; HMDB04207 Glutamyllysine, also known as L-glu-L-lys or E-K, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Glutamyllysine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glutamyllysine has been primarily detected in cerebrospinal fluid. Glutamyllysine can be biosynthesized from L-glutamic acid and L-lysine.
Glutarylcarnitine ; HMDB0013130 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
Glutarylcarnitine ; HMDB13130 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
Glutathione ; HMDB0000125 Glutathione, also known as GSH or agifutol S, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as peptides. Peptides are compounds containing an amide derived from two or more amino carboxylic acid molecules (the same or different) by formation of a covalent bond from the carbonyl carbon of one to the nitrogen atom of another. Glutathione is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Glutathione exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Glutathione has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, glutathione is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Glutathione exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glutathione participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glutathione can be biosynthesized from Gamma-glutamylcysteine and glycine through its interaction with the enzyme glutathione synthetase. Furthermore, Glutathione can be biosynthesized from oxidized glutathione; which is mediated by the enzyme glutathione reductase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Glutathione can be biosynthesized from Gamma-glutamylcysteine and glycine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glutathione synthetase. Finally, Glutathione can be converted into oxidized glutathione; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1. In humans, glutathione is involved in the diflunisal action pathway, the homocarnosinosis pathway, the trisalicylate-choline action pathway, and the cyclophosphamide metabolism pathway. Glutathione is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the leigh syndrome pathway, Gamma-glutamyltransferase deficiency, the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway, and the 2-hydroxyglutric aciduria (D and L form) pathway. Outside of the human body, glutathione can be found in dill. This makes glutathione a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. Glutathione is a potentially toxic compound.
Glutathione ; HMDB00125 Glutathione, also known as GSH or agifutol S, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as peptides. Peptides are compounds containing an amide derived from two or more amino carboxylic acid molecules (the same or different) by formation of a covalent bond from the carbonyl carbon of one to the nitrogen atom of another. Glutathione is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. Glutathione exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Glutathione has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, glutathione is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Glutathione exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glutathione participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glutathione can be biosynthesized from Gamma-glutamylcysteine and glycine through its interaction with the enzyme glutathione synthetase. Furthermore, Glutathione can be biosynthesized from oxidized glutathione; which is mediated by the enzyme glutathione reductase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Glutathione can be biosynthesized from Gamma-glutamylcysteine and glycine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glutathione synthetase. Finally, Glutathione can be converted into oxidized glutathione; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1. In humans, glutathione is involved in the diflunisal action pathway, the homocarnosinosis pathway, the trisalicylate-choline action pathway, and the cyclophosphamide metabolism pathway. Glutathione is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the leigh syndrome pathway, Gamma-glutamyltransferase deficiency, the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway, and the 2-hydroxyglutric aciduria (D and L form) pathway. Outside of the human body, glutathione can be found in dill. This makes glutathione a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. Glutathione is a potentially toxic compound.
Glyceric acid ; HMDB0000139 Glyceric acid, also known as glycerate or D-groa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar acids and derivatives. Sugar acids and derivatives are compounds containing a saccharide unit which bears a carboxylic acid group. Glyceric acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glyceric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, sweat, blood, and urine. Within the cell, glyceric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Glyceric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glyceric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glyceric acid can be converted into 3-phosphoglyceric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme glycerate kinase. In addition, Glyceric acid can be biosynthesized from 3-phosphoglyceric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme glycerate kinase. In humans, glyceric acid is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, the glycerolipid metabolism pathway, and the D-glyceric acidura pathway. Glyceric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include dimethylglycine dehydrogenase deficiency, the sarcosinemia pathway, the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, and glycerol kinase deficiency. Glyceric acid is a potentially toxic compound. Glyceric acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as schizophrenia; glyceric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including d-glyceric acidemia, primary hyperoxaluria II, and primary hyperoxaluria.
Glyceric acid ; HMDB00139 Glyceric acid, also known as glycerate or D-groa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar acids and derivatives. Sugar acids and derivatives are compounds containing a saccharide unit which bears a carboxylic acid group. Glyceric acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glyceric acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, sweat, blood, and urine. Within the cell, glyceric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Glyceric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glyceric acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glyceric acid can be converted into 3-phosphoglyceric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme glycerate kinase. In addition, Glyceric acid can be biosynthesized from 3-phosphoglyceric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme glycerate kinase. In humans, glyceric acid is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, the glycerolipid metabolism pathway, and the D-glyceric acidura pathway. Glyceric acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include dimethylglycine dehydrogenase deficiency, the sarcosinemia pathway, the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, and glycerol kinase deficiency. Glyceric acid is a potentially toxic compound. Glyceric acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as schizophrenia; glyceric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including d-glyceric acidemia, primary hyperoxaluria II, and primary hyperoxaluria.
Glycerol 3-phosphate ; HMDB0000126 Glycerol 3-phosphate, also known as glycerophosphoric acid or sn-gro-1-p, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycerophosphates. Glycerophosphates are compounds containing a glycerol linked to a phosphate group. Glycerol 3-phosphate exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycerol 3-phosphate has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, glycerol 3-phosphate is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Glycerol 3-phosphate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glycerol 3-phosphate participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glycerol 3-phosphate can be biosynthesized from dihydroxyacetone phosphate through its interaction with the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [nad(+)], cytoplasmic. Furthermore, Glycerol 3-phosphate can be converted into cytidine monophosphate; which is catalyzed by the enzyme CDP-diacylglycerol--glycerol-3-phosphate 3-phosphatidyltransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Glycerol 3-phosphate can be biosynthesized from dihydroxyacetone phosphate; which is mediated by the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [nad(+)], cytoplasmic. Furthermore, Palmityl-CoA and glycerol 3-phosphate can be converted into lpa(16:0/0:0) through its interaction with the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. Furthermore, Glycerol 3-phosphate can be biosynthesized from dihydroxyacetone phosphate; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [nad(+)], cytoplasmic. Finally, Palmityl-CoA and glycerol 3-phosphate can be converted into lpa(16:0/0:0) through the action of the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. In humans, glycerol 3-phosphate is involved in cardiolipin biosynthesis CL(a-13:0/i-24:0/i-24:0/i-15:0) pathway, cardiolipin biosynthesis CL(i-12:0/i-22:0/i-19:0/i-18:0) pathway, cardiolipin biosynthesis CL(18:0/18:0/22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway, and cardiolipin biosynthesis CL(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:1(11Z)/16:0) pathway. Glycerol 3-phosphate is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(i-22:0/i-20:0/21:0) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(20:0/19:0/i-20:0) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/14:0/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway. Outside of the human body, glycerol 3-phosphate can be found in a number of food items such as sweet rowanberry, canada blueberry, spinach, and pepper (c. baccatum). This makes glycerol 3-phosphate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Glycerol 3-phosphate ; HMDB00126 Glycerol 3-phosphate, also known as glycerophosphoric acid or sn-gro-1-p, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycerophosphates. Glycerophosphates are compounds containing a glycerol linked to a phosphate group. Glycerol 3-phosphate exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycerol 3-phosphate has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, glycerol 3-phosphate is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Glycerol 3-phosphate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glycerol 3-phosphate participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glycerol 3-phosphate can be biosynthesized from dihydroxyacetone phosphate through its interaction with the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [nad(+)], cytoplasmic. Furthermore, Glycerol 3-phosphate can be converted into cytidine monophosphate; which is catalyzed by the enzyme CDP-diacylglycerol--glycerol-3-phosphate 3-phosphatidyltransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Glycerol 3-phosphate can be biosynthesized from dihydroxyacetone phosphate; which is mediated by the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [nad(+)], cytoplasmic. Furthermore, Palmityl-CoA and glycerol 3-phosphate can be converted into lpa(16:0/0:0) through its interaction with the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. Furthermore, Glycerol 3-phosphate can be biosynthesized from dihydroxyacetone phosphate; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [nad(+)], cytoplasmic. Finally, Palmityl-CoA and glycerol 3-phosphate can be converted into lpa(16:0/0:0) through the action of the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. In humans, glycerol 3-phosphate is involved in cardiolipin biosynthesis CL(a-13:0/i-24:0/i-24:0/i-15:0) pathway, cardiolipin biosynthesis CL(i-12:0/i-22:0/i-19:0/i-18:0) pathway, cardiolipin biosynthesis CL(18:0/18:0/22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/18:1(9Z)) pathway, and cardiolipin biosynthesis CL(18:2(9Z,12Z)/18:1(9Z)/18:1(11Z)/16:0) pathway. Glycerol 3-phosphate is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(i-22:0/i-20:0/21:0) pathway, de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(20:0/19:0/i-20:0) pathway, and de novo triacylglycerol biosynthesis TG(18:1(11Z)/14:0/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)) pathway. Outside of the human body, glycerol 3-phosphate can be found in a number of food items such as sweet rowanberry, canada blueberry, spinach, and pepper (c. baccatum). This makes glycerol 3-phosphate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Glycerol ; HMDB0000131 Glycerol, also known as glycerin or glycyl alcohol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sugar alcohols. These are hydrogenated forms of carbohydrate in which the carbonyl group (aldehyde or ketone, reducing sugar) has been reduced to a primary or secondary hydroxyl group. Glycerol exists as a liquid, very soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycerol has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, sweat, feces, and blood. Within the cell, glycerol is primarily located in the mitochondria, myelin sheath and cytoplasm. Glycerol exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glycerol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glycerol can be biosynthesized from glyceraldehyde through the action of the enzyme aldose reductase. Furthermore, Glycerol can be converted into glycerol 3-phosphate through the action of the enzyme glycerol kinase. Finally, D-Galactose and glycerol can be converted into galactosylglycerol through the action of the enzyme Alpha-galactosidase a. In humans, glycerol is involved in the D-glyceric acidura pathway, the galactose metabolism pathway, and the glycerolipid metabolism pathway. Glycerol is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include glycerol kinase deficiency, the galactosemia pathway, and familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency. Glycerol is a potentially toxic compound.
Glycerol triheptadecanoate ; HMDB0031106 TG(17:0/17:0/17:0), also known as triheptadecanoin, 8CI or trimargarin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as triacylglycerols. These are glycerides consisting of three fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Thus, TG(17:0/17:0/17:0) is considered to be a triradylglycerol lipid molecule. TG(17:0/17:0/17:0) exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. TG(17:0/17:0/17:0) has been found in human adipose tissue tissue, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, TG(17:0/17:0/17:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome.
Glycerol triheptadecanoate ; HMDB31106 TG(17:0/17:0/17:0), also known as triheptadecanoin, 8CI or trimargarin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as triacylglycerols. These are glycerides consisting of three fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Thus, TG(17:0/17:0/17:0) is considered to be a triradylglycerol lipid molecule. TG(17:0/17:0/17:0) exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. TG(17:0/17:0/17:0) has been found in human adipose tissue tissue, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, TG(17:0/17:0/17:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome.
Glycerophosphocholine ; HMDB0000086 Glycerophosphocholine, also known as choline alfoscerate or GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycerophosphocholines. These are lipids containing a glycerol moiety carrying a phosphocholine at the 3-position. Glycerophosphocholine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycerophosphocholine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including semen, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and feces. Within the cell, glycerophosphocholine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Glycerophosphocholine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glycerophosphocholine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glycerophosphocholine can be biosynthesized from 11-cis-retinol and PC(24:1(15Z)/15:0); which is mediated by the enzyme lecithin retinol acyltransferase. In addition, Retinyl ester and glycerophosphocholine can be biosynthesized from vitamin a and PC(24:1(15Z)/15:0); which is mediated by the enzyme lecithin retinol acyltransferase. In humans, glycerophosphocholine is involved in the retinol metabolism pathway. Glycerophosphocholine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called vitamin a deficiency.
Glycerophosphocholine ; HMDB00086 Glycerophosphocholine, also known as choline alfoscerate or GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycerophosphocholines. These are lipids containing a glycerol moiety carrying a phosphocholine at the 3-position. Glycerophosphocholine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycerophosphocholine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including semen, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and feces. Within the cell, glycerophosphocholine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Glycerophosphocholine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glycerophosphocholine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glycerophosphocholine can be biosynthesized from 11-cis-retinol and PC(24:1(15Z)/15:0); which is mediated by the enzyme lecithin retinol acyltransferase. In addition, Retinyl ester and glycerophosphocholine can be biosynthesized from vitamin a and PC(24:1(15Z)/15:0); which is mediated by the enzyme lecithin retinol acyltransferase. In humans, glycerophosphocholine is involved in the retinol metabolism pathway. Glycerophosphocholine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called vitamin a deficiency.
Glycerylphosphorylethanolamine ; HMDB0000114 Glycerylphosphorylethanolamine, also known as gpea, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as organic phosphoramides. These are organic compounds containing the phosphoric acid amide functional group. Glycerylphosphorylethanolamine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycerylphosphorylethanolamine has been found in human brain, prostate and liver tissues. Within the cell, glycerylphosphorylethanolamine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Glycerylphosphorylethanolamine can be converted into glycerol 3-phosphate and ethanolamine through its interaction with the enzyme glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase 1. In humans, glycerylphosphorylethanolamine is involved in phospholipid biosynthesis pathway.
Glycine ; HMDB0000123 Glycine, also known as Gly or aminoacetic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Glycine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and bile. Glycine can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in myelin sheath, cytoplasm, peroxisome, and mitochondria. Glycine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glycine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Gamma-Glutamylcysteine and glycine can be converted into glutathione through its interaction with the enzyme glutathione synthetase. Furthermore, Chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and glycine can be converted into chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate and glycocholic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acid-coa:amino acid N-acyltransferase. Furthermore, Acetyl-CoA and glycine can be converted into L-2-amino-3-oxobutanoic acid through the action of the enzyme 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase, mitochondrial. Finally, Formaldehyde and glycine can be biosynthesized from sarcosine; which is mediated by the enzyme sarcosine dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In humans, glycine is involved in the homocarnosinosis pathway, the sarcosine oncometabolite pathway, the glutathione metabolism pathway, and the thioguanine action pathway. Glycine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the ammonia recycling pathway, congenital erythropoietic porphyria (cep) or gunther disease pathway, adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency, and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency. Glycine is a potentially toxic compound. Glycine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as phosphoserine phosphatase deficiency, glucoglycinuria, epilepsy, early-onset, vitamin b6-dependent, and hyperglycinemia, lactic acidosis, and seizures; glycine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including tyrosinemia I.
Glycine ; HMDB00123 Glycine, also known as Gly or aminoacetic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Glycine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and bile. Glycine can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in myelin sheath, cytoplasm, peroxisome, and mitochondria. Glycine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Glycine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Gamma-Glutamylcysteine and glycine can be converted into glutathione through its interaction with the enzyme glutathione synthetase. Furthermore, Chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and glycine can be converted into chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate and glycocholic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acid-coa:amino acid N-acyltransferase. Furthermore, Acetyl-CoA and glycine can be converted into L-2-amino-3-oxobutanoic acid through the action of the enzyme 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase, mitochondrial. Finally, Formaldehyde and glycine can be biosynthesized from sarcosine; which is mediated by the enzyme sarcosine dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In humans, glycine is involved in the homocarnosinosis pathway, the sarcosine oncometabolite pathway, the glutathione metabolism pathway, and the thioguanine action pathway. Glycine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the ammonia recycling pathway, congenital erythropoietic porphyria (cep) or gunther disease pathway, adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency, and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency. Glycine is a potentially toxic compound. Glycine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as phosphoserine phosphatase deficiency, glucoglycinuria, epilepsy, early-onset, vitamin b6-dependent, and hyperglycinemia, lactic acidosis, and seizures; glycine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including tyrosinemia I.
Glycocholic acid ; HMDB0000138 Glycocholic acid, also known as glycocholate or cholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Glycocholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Glycocholic acid has been found in human hepatic tissue, prostate and liver tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, glycocholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Glycocholic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate and glycocholic acid can be biosynthesized from chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and glycine; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acid-coa:amino acid N-acyltransferase. In addition, Glycocholic acid can be biosynthesized from choloyl-CoA and glycine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme bile acid-coa:amino acid N-acyltransferase. In humans, glycocholic acid is involved in congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, and the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway. Glycocholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the zellweger syndrome pathway.
Glycocholic acid ; HMDB00138 Glycocholic acid, also known as glycocholate or cholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Glycocholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Glycocholic acid has been found in human hepatic tissue, prostate and liver tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, glycocholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Glycocholic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Chenodeoxycholic acid glycine conjugate and glycocholic acid can be biosynthesized from chenodeoxycholoyl-CoA and glycine; which is mediated by the enzyme bile acid-coa:amino acid N-acyltransferase. In addition, Glycocholic acid can be biosynthesized from choloyl-CoA and glycine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme bile acid-coa:amino acid N-acyltransferase. In humans, glycocholic acid is involved in congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, and the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway. Glycocholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the zellweger syndrome pathway.
Glycoursodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB0000708 Glycoursodeoxycholic acid, also known as gudca or ursodeoxycholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, glycoursodeoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid can be biosynthesized from ursodeoxycholic acid.
Glycoursodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB00708 Glycoursodeoxycholic acid, also known as gudca or ursodeoxycholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, glycoursodeoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid can be biosynthesized from ursodeoxycholic acid.
Glycylleucine ; HMDB0000759 Glycylleucine, also known as GL or gly-DL-leu, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as peptides. Peptides are compounds containing an amide derived from two or more amino carboxylic acid molecules (the same or different) by formation of a covalent bond from the carbonyl carbon of one to the nitrogen atom of another. Glycylleucine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Glycylleucine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, feces, and urine. Within the cell, glycylleucine is primarily located in the mitochondria. Glycylleucine can be biosynthesized from glycine and L-leucine.
Guanidoacetic acid ; HMDB0000128 Guanidoacetic acid, also known as guanidinoacetate or N-amidinoglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon), or a derivative thereof. Guanidoacetic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Guanidoacetic acid has been found in human brain, liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, guanidoacetic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Guanidoacetic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Guanidoacetic acid and orotidylic acid can be biosynthesized from glycine and L-arginine through the action of the enzyme glycine amidinotransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Guanidoacetic acid and S-adenosylhomocysteine can be converted into S-adenosylmethionine and creatine through the action of the enzyme guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. Furthermore, Ornithine and guanidoacetic acid can be biosynthesized from L-arginine and glycine through the action of the enzyme glycine amidinotransferase, mitochondrial. Finally, S-Adenosylmethionine and guanidoacetic acid can be converted into S-adenosylhomocysteine and creatine through its interaction with the enzyme guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. In humans, guanidoacetic acid is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway and the arginine and proline metabolism pathway. Guanidoacetic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (gamt deficiency), ornithine aminotransferase deficiency (oat deficiency), the hyperprolinemia type I pathway, and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency (DHPD). Outside of the human body, guanidoacetic acid can be found in apple and loquat. This makes guanidoacetic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Guanidoacetic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Guanidoacetic acid ; HMDB00128 Guanidoacetic acid, also known as guanidinoacetate or N-amidinoglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon), or a derivative thereof. Guanidoacetic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Guanidoacetic acid has been found in human brain, liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, guanidoacetic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Guanidoacetic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Guanidoacetic acid and orotidylic acid can be biosynthesized from glycine and L-arginine through the action of the enzyme glycine amidinotransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Guanidoacetic acid and S-adenosylhomocysteine can be converted into S-adenosylmethionine and creatine through the action of the enzyme guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. Furthermore, Ornithine and guanidoacetic acid can be biosynthesized from L-arginine and glycine through the action of the enzyme glycine amidinotransferase, mitochondrial. Finally, S-Adenosylmethionine and guanidoacetic acid can be converted into S-adenosylhomocysteine and creatine through its interaction with the enzyme guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase. In humans, guanidoacetic acid is involved in the glycine and serine metabolism pathway and the arginine and proline metabolism pathway. Guanidoacetic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (gamt deficiency), ornithine aminotransferase deficiency (oat deficiency), the hyperprolinemia type I pathway, and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency (DHPD). Outside of the human body, guanidoacetic acid can be found in apple and loquat. This makes guanidoacetic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Guanidoacetic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Guanine ; HMDB0000132 Guanine, also known as G or mearlmaid aa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purines and purine derivatives. These are aromatic heterocyclic compounds containing a purine moiety, which is formed a pyrimidine-ring ring fused to an imidazole ring. Guanine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Guanine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, guanine is primarily located in the myelin sheath. Guanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Guanine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Guanine and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate can be biosynthesized from guanosine monophosphate through its interaction with the enzyme adenine phosphoribosyltransferase. In addition, Guanine and ribose 1-phosphate can be biosynthesized from guanosine; which is mediated by the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In humans, guanine is involved in the mercaptopurine action pathway, the thioguanine action pathway, the purine metabolism pathway, and the azathioprine action pathway. Guanine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency, the mitochondrial dna depletion syndrome pathway, the xanthinuria type II pathway, and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Outside of the human body, guanine can be found in guava. This makes guanine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Guanosine ; HMDB0000133 Guanosine, also known as G or 2-amino-inosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. Guanosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Guanosine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, guanosine is primarily located in the mitochondria, lysosome and cytoplasm. Guanosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Guanosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Guanosine can be biosynthesized from guanosine monophosphate; which is mediated by the enzyme cytosolic purine 5'-nucleotidase. In addition, Guanosine can be converted into guanine and ribose 1-phosphate through the action of the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In humans, guanosine is involved in the purine metabolism pathway, the azathioprine action pathway, the thioguanine action pathway, and the mercaptopurine action pathway. Guanosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency, the gout or kelley-seegmiller syndrome pathway, the AICA-ribosiduria pathway, and the xanthinuria type I pathway.
Guanosine ; HMDB00133 Guanosine, also known as G or 2-amino-inosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. Guanosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Guanosine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, guanosine is primarily located in the mitochondria, lysosome and cytoplasm. Guanosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Guanosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Guanosine can be biosynthesized from guanosine monophosphate; which is mediated by the enzyme cytosolic purine 5'-nucleotidase. In addition, Guanosine can be converted into guanine and ribose 1-phosphate through the action of the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In humans, guanosine is involved in the purine metabolism pathway, the azathioprine action pathway, the thioguanine action pathway, and the mercaptopurine action pathway. Guanosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency, the gout or kelley-seegmiller syndrome pathway, the AICA-ribosiduria pathway, and the xanthinuria type I pathway.
Guanosine diphosphate ; HMDB0001201 Guanosine diphosphate, also known as 5'-diphosphate, guanosine or GDP, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine ribonucleoside diphosphates. These are purine ribobucleotides with diphosphate group linked to the ribose moiety. Guanosine diphosphate is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Guanosine diphosphate has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, guanosine diphosphate is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus and golgi. Guanosine diphosphate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Guanosine diphosphate participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Guanosine diphosphate can be converted into guanosine triphosphate through the action of the enzyme nucleoside diphosphate kinase 6. In addition, Guanosine diphosphate can be converted into guanosine monophosphate; which is catalyzed by the enzyme ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5. In humans, guanosine diphosphate is involved in the clocinizine H1-antihistamine action pathway, the alimemazine H1-antihistamine action pathway, the aspartate metabolism pathway, and the intracellular signalling through LHCGR receptor and luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin pathway. Guanosine diphosphate is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hypoacetylaspartia pathway, the gout or kelley-seegmiller syndrome pathway, adenosine deaminase deficiency, and the leigh syndrome pathway. Outside of the human body, guanosine diphosphate can be found in a number of food items such as garlic, skunk currant, carob, and japanese walnut. This makes guanosine diphosphate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Guanosine diphosphate ; HMDB01201 Guanosine diphosphate, also known as 5'-diphosphate, guanosine or GDP, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine ribonucleoside diphosphates. These are purine ribobucleotides with diphosphate group linked to the ribose moiety. Guanosine diphosphate is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Guanosine diphosphate has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, guanosine diphosphate is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus and golgi. Guanosine diphosphate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Guanosine diphosphate participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Guanosine diphosphate can be converted into guanosine triphosphate through the action of the enzyme nucleoside diphosphate kinase 6. In addition, Guanosine diphosphate can be converted into guanosine monophosphate; which is catalyzed by the enzyme ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5. In humans, guanosine diphosphate is involved in the clocinizine H1-antihistamine action pathway, the alimemazine H1-antihistamine action pathway, the aspartate metabolism pathway, and the intracellular signalling through LHCGR receptor and luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin pathway. Guanosine diphosphate is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hypoacetylaspartia pathway, the gout or kelley-seegmiller syndrome pathway, adenosine deaminase deficiency, and the leigh syndrome pathway. Outside of the human body, guanosine diphosphate can be found in a number of food items such as garlic, skunk currant, carob, and japanese walnut. This makes guanosine diphosphate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Heme ; HMDB0003178 Heme is the color-furnishing portion of hemoglobin. It is found free in tissues and as the prosthetic group in many hemeproteins. A heme or haem is a prosthetic group that consists of an iron atom contained in the center of a large heterocyclic organic ring called a porphyrin. Not all porphyrins contain iron, but a substantial fraction of porphyrin-containing metalloproteins have heme as their prosthetic subunit; these are known as hemoproteins.
Heptadecanoic acid ; HMDB0002259 Margaric acid, also known as 17:0 or heptadecoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Margaric acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Margaric acid has been found in human skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and prostate tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, margaric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Margaric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Margaric acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 2-hydroxyheptadecanoic acid, (16R)-16-hydroxymargaric acid, and cholesteryl heptadecanoate.
Heptadecanoic acid ; HMDB02259 Margaric acid, also known as 17:0 or heptadecoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Margaric acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Margaric acid has been found in human skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and prostate tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, margaric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Margaric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Margaric acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 2-hydroxyheptadecanoic acid, (16R)-16-hydroxymargaric acid, and cholesteryl heptadecanoate.
Heptanoylcarnitine ; HMDB0013238 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
Heptanoylcarnitine ; HMDB13238 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
Hexacosanoyl carnitine ; HMDB0006347 Hexacosanoyl carnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, hexacosanoyl carnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Hexacosanoyl carnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Hexacosanoyl carnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, hexacosanoyl carnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and mitochondria.
Hexacosanoyl carnitine ; HMDB06347 Hexacosanoyl carnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, hexacosanoyl carnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Hexacosanoyl carnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Hexacosanoyl carnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, hexacosanoyl carnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and mitochondria.
Hexadecanedioic acid ; HMDB0000672 Thapsic acid, also known as thapsate or hexadecanedioate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thapsic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Thapsic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, thapsic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Thapsic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, (3S)-hydroxyhexadecanedioyl-CoA, hexadecanedioyl-CoA, and (3R)-hydroxyhexadecanedioyl-CoA. Outside of the human body, thapsic acid can be found in potato and sweet cherry. This makes thapsic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Hexadecanedioic acid ; HMDB00672 Thapsic acid, also known as thapsate or hexadecanedioate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Thapsic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Thapsic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, thapsic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Thapsic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, (3S)-hydroxyhexadecanedioyl-CoA, hexadecanedioyl-CoA, and (3R)-hydroxyhexadecanedioyl-CoA. Outside of the human body, thapsic acid can be found in potato and sweet cherry. This makes thapsic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Hexanoylcarnitine ; HMDB0000705 Hexanoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, hexanoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Hexanoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Hexanoylcarnitine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, hexanoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Hexanoylcarnitine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including glutaric aciduria II.
Hexanoylcarnitine ; HMDB0000756 Hexanoylcarnitine (CAS: 6418-78-6), also known as caproylcarnitine, is an acylcarnitine. Numerous disorders have been described that lead to disturbances in energy production and in intermediary metabolism in the organism which are characterized by the production and excretion of unusual acylcarnitines. A mutation in the gene coding for carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase or the OCTN2 transporter aetiologically causes a carnitine deficiency that results in poor intestinal absorption of dietary L-carnitine, its impaired reabsorption by the kidney and, consequently, in increased urinary loss of L-carnitine. Determination of the qualitative pattern of acylcarnitines can be of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. The betaine structure of carnitine requires special analytical procedures for recording. The ionic nature of L-carnitine causes a high water solubility which decreases with increasing chain length of the ester group in the acylcarnitines. Therefore, the distribution of L-carnitine and acylcarnitines in various organs is defined by their function and their physicochemical properties as well. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) permits screening for free and total carnitine, as well as complete quantitative acylcarnitine determination, including the long-chain acylcarnitine profile (PMID: 17508264, Monatshefte fuer Chemie (2005), 136(8), 1279-1291., Int J Mass Spectrom. 1999;188:39-52.). Hexanoylcarnitine is a medium-chain acylcarnitine present in the urine of patients with medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (PMID: 1635814). Hexanoylcarnitine is also found to be associated with celiac disease and glutaric aciduria II which are both inborn errors of metabolism.
Hexanoylcarnitine ; HMDB00705 Hexanoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, hexanoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Hexanoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Hexanoylcarnitine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, hexanoylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Hexanoylcarnitine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including glutaric aciduria II.
Hexanoylglycine ; HMDB0000701 Hexanoylglycine, also known as N-caproylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. Hexanoylglycine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hexanoylglycine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Hexanoylglycine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.
Hippuric acid ; HMDB0000714 Hippuric acid, also known as N-benzoylglycine or hippurate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hippuric acids. Hippuric acids are compounds containing hippuric acid, which consists of a of a benzoyl group linked to the N-terminal of a glycine. Hippuric acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hippuric acid has been found in human prostate, liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and feces. Within the cell, hippuric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hippuric acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, p-hydroxyhippuric acid, alpha-hydroxyhippuric acid, and m-methylhippuric acid. Outside of the human body, hippuric acid can be found in american cranberry and avocado. This makes hippuric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Hippuric acid is a potentially toxic compound. Hippuric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as paraquat poisoning, schizophrenia, and lung cancer; hippuric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including phenylketonuria and propionic acidemia.
Hippuric acid ; HMDB00714 Hippuric acid, also known as N-benzoylglycine or hippurate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hippuric acids. Hippuric acids are compounds containing hippuric acid, which consists of a of a benzoyl group linked to the N-terminal of a glycine. Hippuric acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hippuric acid has been found in human prostate, liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and feces. Within the cell, hippuric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hippuric acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, p-hydroxyhippuric acid, alpha-hydroxyhippuric acid, and m-methylhippuric acid. Outside of the human body, hippuric acid can be found in american cranberry and avocado. This makes hippuric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Hippuric acid is a potentially toxic compound. Hippuric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as paraquat poisoning, schizophrenia, and lung cancer; hippuric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including phenylketonuria and propionic acidemia.
Homo-L-arginine ; HMDB0000670 Homo-L-arginine, also known as n6-amidino-lysine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Homo-L-arginine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Homo-L-arginine has been found in human intestine and testicle tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, homo-L-arginine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Homo-L-arginine has been found to be associated with the diseases known as cirrhosis; homo-l-arginine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hyperargininemia.
Homo-L-arginine ; HMDB00670 Homo-L-arginine, also known as n6-amidino-lysine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Homo-L-arginine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Homo-L-arginine has been found in human intestine and testicle tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, homo-L-arginine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Homo-L-arginine has been found to be associated with the diseases known as cirrhosis; homo-l-arginine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hyperargininemia.
Homocitrulline ; HMDB0000679 Homocitrulline belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Homocitrulline exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Homocitrulline has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, homocitrulline is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
Homocitrulline ; HMDB00679 Homocitrulline belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Homocitrulline exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Homocitrulline has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, homocitrulline is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
Homocysteine ; HMDB0000742 Homocysteine, also known as Hcy or homo-cys, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Homocysteine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Homocysteine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, homocysteine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Homocysteine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Homocysteine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Betaine and homocysteine can be converted into dimethylglycine and L-methionine through the action of the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Furthermore, L-Serine and homocysteine can be converted into L-cystathionine; which is mediated by the enzyme cystathionine beta-synthase. Furthermore, Betaine and homocysteine can be converted into dimethylglycine and L-methionine through its interaction with the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Furthermore, Homocysteine and 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid can be converted into L-methionine and tetrahydrofolic acid through its interaction with the enzyme methionine synthase. Furthermore, 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic acid and homocysteine can be converted into tetrahydrofolic acid and L-methionine through the action of the enzyme methionine synthase. Finally, Homocysteine and L-serine can be converted into L-cystathionine through its interaction with the enzyme cystathionine beta-synthase. In humans, homocysteine is involved in the sarcosine oncometabolite pathway, the methionine metabolism pathway, the betaine metabolism pathway, and catecholamine biosynthesis pathway. Homocysteine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (MTHFRD), the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway, and the hypermethioninemia pathway. Outside of the human body, homocysteine can be found in a number of food items such as acerola, walnut, chinese bayberry, and passion fruit. This makes homocysteine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Homocysteine is a potentially toxic compound. Homocysteine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and peripheral neuropathy; homocysteine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including homocystinuria.
Homocysteine ; HMDB00742 Homocysteine, also known as Hcy or homo-cys, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Homocysteine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Homocysteine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, homocysteine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Homocysteine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Homocysteine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Betaine and homocysteine can be converted into dimethylglycine and L-methionine through the action of the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Furthermore, L-Serine and homocysteine can be converted into L-cystathionine; which is mediated by the enzyme cystathionine beta-synthase. Furthermore, Betaine and homocysteine can be converted into dimethylglycine and L-methionine through its interaction with the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. Furthermore, Homocysteine and 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid can be converted into L-methionine and tetrahydrofolic acid through its interaction with the enzyme methionine synthase. Furthermore, 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic acid and homocysteine can be converted into tetrahydrofolic acid and L-methionine through the action of the enzyme methionine synthase. Finally, Homocysteine and L-serine can be converted into L-cystathionine through its interaction with the enzyme cystathionine beta-synthase. In humans, homocysteine is involved in the sarcosine oncometabolite pathway, the methionine metabolism pathway, the betaine metabolism pathway, and catecholamine biosynthesis pathway. Homocysteine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (MTHFRD), the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway, and the hypermethioninemia pathway. Outside of the human body, homocysteine can be found in a number of food items such as acerola, walnut, chinese bayberry, and passion fruit. This makes homocysteine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Homocysteine is a potentially toxic compound. Homocysteine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and peripheral neuropathy; homocysteine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including homocystinuria.
Homovanillic acid ; HMDB0000118 Homovanillic acid, also known as vanillacetate or homovanillate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methoxyphenols. Methoxyphenols are compounds containing a methoxy group attached to the benzene ring of a phenol moiety. Homovanillic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Homovanillic acid has been found in human brain, spinal cord and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, urine, saliva, and feces. Within the cell, homovanillic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Homovanillic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Homovanillic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Homovanillic acid can be biosynthesized from homovanillin; which is catalyzed by the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase, dimeric nadp-preferring. In addition, Homovanillic acid and pyrocatechol can be biosynthesized from 3,4-dihydroxybenzeneacetic acid and guaiacol through its interaction with the enzyme catechol O-methyltransferase. In humans, homovanillic acid is involved in the disulfiram action pathway and the tyrosine metabolism pathway. Homovanillic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the tyrosinemia type I pathway, tyrosinemia, transient, OF the newborn pathway, dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency, and the hawkinsinuria pathway. Outside of the human body, homovanillic acid can be found in avocado, beer, and olive. This makes homovanillic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Homovanillic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as narcolepsy, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia; homovanillic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease and growth hormone deficiency.
Homovanillic acid ; HMDB00118 Homovanillic acid, also known as vanillacetate or homovanillate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methoxyphenols. Methoxyphenols are compounds containing a methoxy group attached to the benzene ring of a phenol moiety. Homovanillic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Homovanillic acid has been found in human brain, spinal cord and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, urine, saliva, and feces. Within the cell, homovanillic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Homovanillic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Homovanillic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Homovanillic acid can be biosynthesized from homovanillin; which is catalyzed by the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase, dimeric nadp-preferring. In addition, Homovanillic acid and pyrocatechol can be biosynthesized from 3,4-dihydroxybenzeneacetic acid and guaiacol through its interaction with the enzyme catechol O-methyltransferase. In humans, homovanillic acid is involved in the disulfiram action pathway and the tyrosine metabolism pathway. Homovanillic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the tyrosinemia type I pathway, tyrosinemia, transient, OF the newborn pathway, dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency, and the hawkinsinuria pathway. Outside of the human body, homovanillic acid can be found in avocado, beer, and olive. This makes homovanillic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Homovanillic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as narcolepsy, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia; homovanillic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease and growth hormone deficiency.
Hydantoin-5-propionic acid ; HMDB0001212 Hydantoin-5-propionic acid, also known as hydantoin-propionate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hydantoins. These are heterocyclic compounds containing an imidazolidine substituted by ketone group at positions 2 and 4. Hydantoin-5-propionic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, hydantoin-5-propionic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hydantoin-5-propionic acid can be converted into hydantoin.
Hydrochlorothiazide ; HMDB0001928 Hydrochlorothiazide, also known as microzide or hydrodiuril, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxides. These are aromatic heterocyclic compounds containing a 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine ring system with two S=O bonds at the 1-position. Hydrochlorothiazide is a drug which is used for the treatment of high blood pressure and management of edema. Hydrochlorothiazide exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hydrochlorothiazide has been found in human adipose tissue and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, hydrochlorothiazide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hydrochlorothiazide can be converted into hydrochlorothiazide through the action of the enzyme solute carrier family 22 member 6. In humans, hydrochlorothiazide is involved in the metabolic disorder called the hydrochlorothiazide action pathway. Hydrochlorothiazide is formally rated as a possible carcinogen (by IARC 2B) and is also a potentially toxic compound.
Hydrochlorothiazide ; HMDB01928 Hydrochlorothiazide, also known as microzide or hydrodiuril, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxides. These are aromatic heterocyclic compounds containing a 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine ring system with two S=O bonds at the 1-position. Hydrochlorothiazide is a drug which is used for the treatment of high blood pressure and management of edema. Hydrochlorothiazide exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hydrochlorothiazide has been found in human adipose tissue and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, hydrochlorothiazide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hydrochlorothiazide can be converted into hydrochlorothiazide through the action of the enzyme solute carrier family 22 member 6. In humans, hydrochlorothiazide is involved in the metabolic disorder called the hydrochlorothiazide action pathway. Hydrochlorothiazide is formally rated as a possible carcinogen (by IARC 2B) and is also a potentially toxic compound.
Hydrocinnamic acid ; HMDB0000764 Hydrocinnamic acid, also known as phenylpropanoate or dihydrocinnamate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylpropanoic acids. Phenylpropanoic acids are compounds with a structure containing a benzene ring conjugated to a propanoic acid. Hydrocinnamic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hydrocinnamic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, hydrocinnamic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hydrocinnamic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, hydrocinnamic acid can be biosynthesized from propionic acid. Hydrocinnamic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, 3-phenylpropionate ester, and 3-hydroxy-3-phenylpropionic acid. Hydrocinnamic acid is a sweet, balsamic, and cinnamon tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as sourdock, common wheat, cashew nut, and nuts. This makes hydrocinnamic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Hydrocinnamic acid ; HMDB00764 Hydrocinnamic acid, also known as phenylpropanoate or dihydrocinnamate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylpropanoic acids. Phenylpropanoic acids are compounds with a structure containing a benzene ring conjugated to a propanoic acid. Hydrocinnamic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hydrocinnamic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, hydrocinnamic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hydrocinnamic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, hydrocinnamic acid can be biosynthesized from propionic acid. Hydrocinnamic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, 3-phenylpropionate ester, and 3-hydroxy-3-phenylpropionic acid. Hydrocinnamic acid is a sweet, balsamic, and cinnamon tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as sourdock, common wheat, cashew nut, and nuts. This makes hydrocinnamic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Hydroquinone sulfate ; HMDB0240263 Hydroquinone sulfate, also known as quinol monosulfate or quinol sulfuric acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylsulfates. Phenylsulfates are compounds containing a sulfuric acid group conjugated to a phenyl group. Hydroquinone sulfate is slightly soluble (in water) and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hydroquinone sulfate can be biosynthesized from hydroquinone.
Hydroxybutyrylcarnitine ; HMDB0013127 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
Hydroxybutyrylcarnitine ; HMDB13127 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
Hydroxycotinine ; HMDB0001390 Hydroxycotinine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrrolidinylpyridines. Pyrrolidinylpyridines are compounds containing a pyrrolidinylpyridine ring system, which consists of a pyrrolidine ring linked to a pyridine ring. Hydroxycotinine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hydroxycotinine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, hydroxycotinine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hydroxycotinine can be biosynthesized from cotinine through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 2A6. In humans, hydroxycotinine is involved in the nicotine action pathway and the nicotine metabolism pathway.
Hydroxycotinine ; HMDB01390 Hydroxycotinine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pyrrolidinylpyridines. Pyrrolidinylpyridines are compounds containing a pyrrolidinylpyridine ring system, which consists of a pyrrolidine ring linked to a pyridine ring. Hydroxycotinine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hydroxycotinine has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, hydroxycotinine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hydroxycotinine can be biosynthesized from cotinine through its interaction with the enzyme cytochrome P450 2A6. In humans, hydroxycotinine is involved in the nicotine action pathway and the nicotine metabolism pathway.
Hydroxykynurenine ; HMDB0000732 Hydroxykynurenine, also known as oh-kynurenine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alkyl-phenylketones. These are aromatic compounds containing a ketone substituted by one alkyl group, and a phenyl group. Hydroxykynurenine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hydroxykynurenine has been found in human brain tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, hydroxykynurenine is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
Hydroxyoctanoic acid ; HMDB0000711 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid, also known as a-hydroxyoctanoate or alpha-hydroxyoctanoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, saliva, and urine. Within the cell, 2-hydroxy caprylic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 2-hydroxy caprylic acid can be biosynthesized from octanoic acid. 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid can also be converted into 2-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA.
Hydroxyoctanoic acid ; HMDB00711 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid, also known as a-hydroxyoctanoate or alpha-hydroxyoctanoic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as medium-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 4 and 12 carbon atoms. 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, saliva, and urine. Within the cell, 2-hydroxy caprylic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, 2-hydroxy caprylic acid can be biosynthesized from octanoic acid. 2-Hydroxy caprylic acid can also be converted into 2-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA.
Hydroxyphenyllactic acid ; HMDB0000755 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid, also known as 4-hydroxyphenyllactate or hpla, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylpropanoic acids. Phenylpropanoic acids are compounds with a structure containing a benzene ring conjugated to a propanoic acid. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid has been found in human epidermis and prostate tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, urine, feces, and blood. Within the cell, 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid is primarily located in the mitochondria. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid can be found in cereals and cereal products. This makes 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as supradiaphragmatic malignancy; 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including phenylketonuria.
Hyodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB0000733 Hyodeoxycholic acid, also known as hyodeoxycholate or nahdc compound, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Hyodeoxycholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Hyodeoxycholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, hyodeoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
Hyodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB00733 Hyodeoxycholic acid, also known as hyodeoxycholate or nahdc compound, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Hyodeoxycholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Hyodeoxycholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, hyodeoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
Hypotaurine ; HMDB0000965 Hypotaurine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sulfinic acids. Sulfinic acids are compounds containing a sulfinic acid functional group, with the general structure RS(=O)OH (R = organyl, not H). Hypotaurine is soluble (in water) and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hypotaurine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, hypotaurine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hypotaurine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Hypotaurine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Hypotaurine can be biosynthesized from cysteamine; which is mediated by the enzyme 2-aminoethanethiol dioxygenase. Furthermore, Hypotaurine can be biosynthesized from 3-sulfinoalanine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase. Finally, Hypotaurine can be biosynthesized from 3-sulfinoalanine; which is mediated by the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase. In humans, hypotaurine is involved in the taurine and hypotaurine metabolism pathway.
Hypotaurine ; HMDB00965 Hypotaurine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as sulfinic acids. Sulfinic acids are compounds containing a sulfinic acid functional group, with the general structure RS(=O)OH (R = organyl, not H). Hypotaurine is soluble (in water) and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hypotaurine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, hypotaurine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Hypotaurine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Hypotaurine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Hypotaurine can be biosynthesized from cysteamine; which is mediated by the enzyme 2-aminoethanethiol dioxygenase. Furthermore, Hypotaurine can be biosynthesized from 3-sulfinoalanine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase. Finally, Hypotaurine can be biosynthesized from 3-sulfinoalanine; which is mediated by the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase. In humans, hypotaurine is involved in the taurine and hypotaurine metabolism pathway.
Hypoxanthine ; HMDB0000157 Hypoxanthine, also known as purine-6-ol or Hyp, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hypoxanthines. Hypoxanthines are compounds containing the purine derivative 1H-purin-6(9H)-one. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. Hypoxanthine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hypoxanthine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, feces, and saliva. Within the cell, hypoxanthine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, lysosome and peroxisome. Hypoxanthine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Hypoxanthine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Hypoxanthine and ribose 1-phosphate can be biosynthesized from inosine through its interaction with the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In addition, Hypoxanthine and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate can be biosynthesized from inosinic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. In humans, hypoxanthine is involved in the azathioprine action pathway, the mercaptopurine action pathway, the thioguanine action pathway, and the purine metabolism pathway. Hypoxanthine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency, myoadenylate deaminase deficiency, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency (aprt), and molybdenum cofactor deficiency. Hypoxanthine is a potentially toxic compound.
Hypoxanthine ; HMDB00157 Hypoxanthine, also known as purine-6-ol or Hyp, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hypoxanthines. Hypoxanthines are compounds containing the purine derivative 1H-purin-6(9H)-one. Purine is a bicyclic aromatic compound made up of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. Hypoxanthine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Hypoxanthine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, feces, and saliva. Within the cell, hypoxanthine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, lysosome and peroxisome. Hypoxanthine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Hypoxanthine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Hypoxanthine and ribose 1-phosphate can be biosynthesized from inosine through its interaction with the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In addition, Hypoxanthine and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate can be biosynthesized from inosinic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. In humans, hypoxanthine is involved in the azathioprine action pathway, the mercaptopurine action pathway, the thioguanine action pathway, and the purine metabolism pathway. Hypoxanthine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency, myoadenylate deaminase deficiency, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency (aprt), and molybdenum cofactor deficiency. Hypoxanthine is a potentially toxic compound.
Ibuprofen ; HMDB0001925
Ibuprofen ; HMDB01925
Imidazoleacetic acid ; HMDB0002024 Imidazoleacetic acid, also known as 4(5)-imidazoleacetate or imac, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an imidazole ring. Imidazoleacetic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Imidazoleacetic acid has been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, imidazoleacetic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Imidazoleacetic acid can be biosynthesized from imidazole-4-acetaldehyde through the action of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In humans, imidazoleacetic acid is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. Imidazoleacetic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway. Outside of the human body, imidazoleacetic acid can be found in a number of food items such as mulberry, herbs and spices, quince, and cloud ear fungus. This makes imidazoleacetic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Imidazoleacetic acid ; HMDB02024 Imidazoleacetic acid, also known as 4(5)-imidazoleacetate or imac, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an imidazole ring. Imidazoleacetic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Imidazoleacetic acid has been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, imidazoleacetic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Imidazoleacetic acid can be biosynthesized from imidazole-4-acetaldehyde through the action of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. In humans, imidazoleacetic acid is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. Imidazoleacetic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway. Outside of the human body, imidazoleacetic acid can be found in a number of food items such as mulberry, herbs and spices, quince, and cloud ear fungus. This makes imidazoleacetic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Imidazolelactic acid ; HMDB0002320 Imidazolelactic acid, also known as 1-imidazolelactate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an imidazole ring. Imidazolelactic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Imidazolelactic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, imidazolelactic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Imidazolelactic acid can be biosynthesized from rac-lactic acid.
Imidazolelactic acid ; HMDB02320 Imidazolelactic acid, also known as 1-imidazolelactate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an imidazole ring. Imidazolelactic acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Imidazolelactic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, imidazolelactic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Imidazolelactic acid can be biosynthesized from rac-lactic acid.
Imidazolepropionic acid ; HMDB0002271 Imidazolepropionic acid, also known as deaminohistidine or 4-imidazolylpropionate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an imidazole ring. Imidazolepropionic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Imidazolepropionic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Imidazolepropionic acid can be biosynthesized from propionic acid.
Imidazolepropionic acid ; HMDB02271 Imidazolepropionic acid, also known as deaminohistidine or 4-imidazolylpropionate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an imidazole ring. Imidazolepropionic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Imidazolepropionic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Imidazolepropionic acid can be biosynthesized from propionic acid.
Indole-3-carboxylic acid ; HMDB0003320 Indole-3-carboxylic acid, also known as 3-indolecarboxylate or 3-indoleformate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indolecarboxylic acids and derivatives. Indolecarboxylic acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid group (or a derivative thereof) linked to an indole. Indole-3-carboxylic acid exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Indole-3-carboxylic acid has been primarily detected in feces. Indole-3-carboxylic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 4-O-(1H-indol-3-ylcarbonyl)ascaroside, 3-indole carboxylic acid glucuronide, and tropisetron. Outside of the human body, indole-3-carboxylic acid can be found in a number of food items such as wakame, pomes, cucumber, and common beet. This makes indole-3-carboxylic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Indole-3-methyl acetate ; HMDB0029738 Indole-3-methyl acetate, also known as methyl 3-indolylacetate or methyl b-indoleacetic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indole-3-acetic acid derivatives. Indole-3-acetic acid derivatives are compounds containing an acetic acid (or a derivative) linked to the C3 carbon atom of an indole. Indole-3-methyl acetate exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). Indole-3-methyl acetate has been primarily detected in feces. Indole-3-methyl acetate can be biosynthesized from indole-3-acetic acid. Outside of the human body, indole-3-methyl acetate can be found in a number of food items such as pulses, green bean, sour cherry, and corn. This makes indole-3-methyl acetate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Indole-3-propionic acid ; HMDB0002302 Indole-3-propionic acid, also known as indolepropionate or b-(3-indolyl)propionic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. Indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an indole ring. Indole-3-propionic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Indole-3-propionic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, indole-3-propionic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Indole-3-propionic acid can be biosynthesized from propionic acid. Outside of the human body, indole-3-propionic acid can be found in common pea. This makes indole-3-propionic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Indole-3-propionic acid ; HMDB02302 Indole-3-propionic acid, also known as indolepropionate or b-(3-indolyl)propionic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. Indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an indole ring. Indole-3-propionic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Indole-3-propionic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, indole-3-propionic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Indole-3-propionic acid can be biosynthesized from propionic acid. Outside of the human body, indole-3-propionic acid can be found in common pea. This makes indole-3-propionic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Indoleacetic acid ; HMDB0000197 Indole-3-acetate, also known as indoleacetic acid or IAA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indole-3-acetic acid derivatives. Indole-3-acetic acid derivatives are compounds containing an acetic acid (or a derivative) linked to the C3 carbon atom of an indole. Indole-3-acetate exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Indole-3-acetate has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and feces. Within the cell, indole-3-acetate is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Indole-3-acetate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, indole-3-acetate is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. Indole-3-acetate is a mild, odorless, and sour tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as yellow zucchini, cornmint, prickly pear, and lemon verbena. This makes indole-3-acetate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Indole-3-acetate is a potentially toxic compound.
Indoleacetic acid ; HMDB00197 Indole-3-acetate, also known as indoleacetic acid or IAA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indole-3-acetic acid derivatives. Indole-3-acetic acid derivatives are compounds containing an acetic acid (or a derivative) linked to the C3 carbon atom of an indole. Indole-3-acetate exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Indole-3-acetate has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and feces. Within the cell, indole-3-acetate is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Indole-3-acetate exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, indole-3-acetate is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. Indole-3-acetate is a mild, odorless, and sour tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as yellow zucchini, cornmint, prickly pear, and lemon verbena. This makes indole-3-acetate a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Indole-3-acetate is a potentially toxic compound.
Indolelactic acid ; HMDB0000671 Indolelactic acid, also known as indole-3-lactate or 5-ihipa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. Indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an indole ring. Indolelactic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Indolelactic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Indolelactic acid can be biosynthesized from rac-lactic acid.
Indolelactic acid ; HMDB00671 Indolelactic acid, also known as indole-3-lactate or 5-ihipa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. Indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an indole ring. Indolelactic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Indolelactic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Indolelactic acid can be biosynthesized from rac-lactic acid.
Indoxyl sulfate ; HMDB0000682 Indoxyl sulfate, also known as indican or sulfate, indoxyl, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as arylsulfates. These are organic compounds containing a sulfate group that carries an aryl group through an ether group. Indoxyl sulfate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Indoxyl sulfate has been found in human prostate, kidney and muscle tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, indoxyl sulfate is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Indoxyl sulfate can be converted into indoxyl. Indoxyl sulfate is a potentially toxic compound.
Indoxyl sulfate ; HMDB00682 Indoxyl sulfate, also known as indican or sulfate, indoxyl, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as arylsulfates. These are organic compounds containing a sulfate group that carries an aryl group through an ether group. Indoxyl sulfate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Indoxyl sulfate has been found in human prostate, kidney and muscle tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, indoxyl sulfate is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Indoxyl sulfate can be converted into indoxyl. Indoxyl sulfate is a potentially toxic compound.
Inosine ; HMDB0000195 Inosine, also known as hypoxanthosine or panholic-L, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. Inosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Inosine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and saliva. Within the cell, inosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and lysosome. Inosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Inosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Inosine can be biosynthesized from inosinic acid through the action of the enzyme cytosolic purine 5'-nucleotidase. In addition, Inosine can be converted into hypoxanthine and ribose 1-phosphate through its interaction with the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In humans, inosine is involved in the purine metabolism pathway, the azathioprine action pathway, the mercaptopurine action pathway, and the thioguanine action pathway. Inosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the AICA-ribosiduria pathway, purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency, adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency, and adenosine deaminase deficiency.
Inosine ; HMDB00195 Inosine, also known as hypoxanthosine or panholic-L, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. Inosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Inosine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and saliva. Within the cell, inosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and lysosome. Inosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Inosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Inosine can be biosynthesized from inosinic acid through the action of the enzyme cytosolic purine 5'-nucleotidase. In addition, Inosine can be converted into hypoxanthine and ribose 1-phosphate through its interaction with the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase. In humans, inosine is involved in the purine metabolism pathway, the azathioprine action pathway, the mercaptopurine action pathway, and the thioguanine action pathway. Inosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the AICA-ribosiduria pathway, purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency, adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency, and adenosine deaminase deficiency.
Isobutyrylglycine ; HMDB0000730 Isobutyrylglycine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. Isobutyrylglycine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Isobutyrylglycine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, isobutyrylglycine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Isobutyrylglycine has been found to be associated with the diseases known as isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency; isobutyrylglycine has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including ethylmalonic encephalopathy, short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, and propionic acidemia.
Isoleucyl-Glycine ; HMDB0028907 Isoleucyl-glycine, also known as i-g dipeptide or ile-gly, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Isoleucyl-glycine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Isoleucyl-glycine has been primarily detected in feces.
Isoursodeoxycholic acid ; HMDB0000686 Isoursodeoxycholic acid, also known as iso-ursodeoxycholate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. Dihydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives are compounds containing or derived from a bile acid or alcohol, and which bears exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Isoursodeoxycholic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Isoursodeoxycholic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, isoursodeoxycholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm.
Isovaleric acid ; HMDB0000718 Isovaleric acid, also known as isovalerate or 3-methylbutanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methyl-branched fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an acyl chain that has a methyl branch. Usually, they are saturated and contain only one or more methyl group. However, branches other than methyl may be present. Isovaleric acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Isovaleric acid has been detected in most biofluids, including blood, feces, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. Within the cell, isovaleric acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Isovaleric acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Isovaleric acid is an animal, cheese, and feet tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as red raspberry, yellow bell pepper, burdock, and chinese cinnamon. This makes isovaleric acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Isovaleric acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and ulcerative colitis; isovaleric acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia and celiac disease.
Isovalerylcarnitine ; HMDB0000688 Isovalerylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, isovalerylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Isovalerylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Isovalerylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, isovalerylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Isovalerylcarnitine can be biosynthesized from isovaleric acid. Isovalerylcarnitine has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, celiac disease, and isovaleric acidemia.
Isovalerylcarnitine ; HMDB00688 Isovalerylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, isovalerylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Isovalerylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Isovalerylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, isovalerylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Isovalerylcarnitine can be biosynthesized from isovaleric acid. Isovalerylcarnitine has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, celiac disease, and isovaleric acidemia.
Isovalerylglycine ; HMDB0000678 Isovalerylglycine, also known as isopentanoylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. Isovalerylglycine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Isovalerylglycine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Isovalerylglycine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as anorexia nervosa and short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency; isovalerylglycine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Isoxanthopterin ; HMDB0000704 Isoxanthopterin belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pterins and derivatives. These are polycyclic aromatic compounds containing a pterin moiety, which consist of a pteridine ring bearing a ketone and an amine group to form 2-aminopteridin-4(3H)-one. Isoxanthopterin is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Isoxanthopterin has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, isoxanthopterin is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, isoxanthopterin can be found in soy bean. This makes isoxanthopterin a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Isoxanthopterin ; HMDB00704 Isoxanthopterin belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pterins and derivatives. These are polycyclic aromatic compounds containing a pterin moiety, which consist of a pteridine ring bearing a ketone and an amine group to form 2-aminopteridin-4(3H)-one. Isoxanthopterin is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Isoxanthopterin has been primarily detected in urine. Within the cell, isoxanthopterin is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, isoxanthopterin can be found in soy bean. This makes isoxanthopterin a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Ketoleucine ; HMDB0000695 Ketoleucine, also known as 2-oxoisocaproate or a-oxoisohexanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain keto acids and derivatives. These are keto acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. Ketoleucine exists as a liquid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Ketoleucine has been found in human prostate and muscle tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, blood, feces, and urine. Within the cell, ketoleucine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Ketoleucine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Ketoleucine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Ketoleucine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-leucine and oxoglutaric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In addition, Ketoleucine and thiamine pyrophosphate can be converted into 3-methyl-1-hydroxybutyl-THPP; which is catalyzed by the enzyme 2-oxoisovalerate dehydrogenase. In humans, ketoleucine is involved in the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway. Ketoleucine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV pathway, and the methylmalonic aciduria pathway. Outside of the human body, ketoleucine can be found in a number of food items such as celery stalks, hyssop, elliott's blueberry, and horned melon. This makes ketoleucine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Ketoleucine is a potentially toxic compound.
Ketoleucine ; HMDB00695 Ketoleucine, also known as 2-oxoisocaproate or a-oxoisohexanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as short-chain keto acids and derivatives. These are keto acids with an alkyl chain the contains less than 6 carbon atoms. Ketoleucine exists as a liquid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Ketoleucine has been found in human prostate and muscle tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including cerebrospinal fluid, blood, feces, and urine. Within the cell, ketoleucine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Ketoleucine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Ketoleucine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Ketoleucine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-leucine and oxoglutaric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In addition, Ketoleucine and thiamine pyrophosphate can be converted into 3-methyl-1-hydroxybutyl-THPP; which is catalyzed by the enzyme 2-oxoisovalerate dehydrogenase. In humans, ketoleucine is involved in the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway. Ketoleucine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV pathway, and the methylmalonic aciduria pathway. Outside of the human body, ketoleucine can be found in a number of food items such as celery stalks, hyssop, elliott's blueberry, and horned melon. This makes ketoleucine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Ketoleucine is a potentially toxic compound.
Kynurenic acid ; HMDB0000715 Kynurenic acid, also known as kynurenate or acid, kynurenic, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as quinoline carboxylic acids. These are quinolines in which the quinoline ring system is substituted by a carboxyl group at one or more positions. Kynurenic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Kynurenic acid has been found in human epidermis, brain and prostate tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, kynurenic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Kynurenic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, kynurenic acid is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. Kynurenic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Kynurenic acid ; HMDB00715 Kynurenic acid, also known as kynurenate or acid, kynurenic, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as quinoline carboxylic acids. These are quinolines in which the quinoline ring system is substituted by a carboxyl group at one or more positions. Kynurenic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Kynurenic acid has been found in human epidermis, brain and prostate tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, kynurenic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Kynurenic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, kynurenic acid is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. Kynurenic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Acetylcarnitine ; HMDB0000201 Acetyl-L-carnitine, also known as alcar or branigen, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, acetyl-L-carnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Acetyl-L-carnitine exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Acetyl-L-carnitine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and breast milk. Acetyl-L-carnitine can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in membrane (predicted from logP), endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisome, and cytoplasm. In humans, acetyl-L-carnitine is involved in the adrenoleukodystrophy, X-linked pathway, the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway, and the oxidation OF branched chain fatty acids pathway. Acetyl-L-carnitine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency.
L-Acetylcarnitine ; HMDB00201 Acetyl-L-carnitine, also known as alcar or branigen, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, acetyl-L-carnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Acetyl-L-carnitine exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Acetyl-L-carnitine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, and breast milk. Acetyl-L-carnitine can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in membrane (predicted from logP), endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisome, and cytoplasm. In humans, acetyl-L-carnitine is involved in the adrenoleukodystrophy, X-linked pathway, the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway, and the oxidation OF branched chain fatty acids pathway. Acetyl-L-carnitine is also involved in the metabolic disorder called carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency.
L-Alanine ; HMDB0000161 L-Alanine, also known as (S)-alanine or L-alpha-alanine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alanine and derivatives. Alanine and derivatives are compounds containing alanine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of alanine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Alanine is a drug which is used for protein synthesis. L-Alanine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Alanine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, L-alanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, lysosome and peroxisome. L-Alanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Alanine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Alanine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into L-glutamic acid and pyruvic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme alanine aminotransferase 1. In addition, Hydroxypyruvic acid and L-alanine can be biosynthesized from pyruvic acid and L-serine through its interaction with the enzyme serine--pyruvate aminotransferase. In humans, L-alanine is involved in the transcription/translation pathway, the chloramphenicol action pathway, the clomocycline action pathway, and the selenoamino acid metabolism pathway. L-Alanine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway, Gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase deficiency, and the glutaminolysis and cancer pathway. Outside of the human body, L-alanine can be found in apple, blackcurrant, sour cherry, and tarragon. This makes L-alanine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. L-Alanine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Alanine ; HMDB00161 L-Alanine, also known as (S)-alanine or L-alpha-alanine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alanine and derivatives. Alanine and derivatives are compounds containing alanine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of alanine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Alanine is a drug which is used for protein synthesis. L-Alanine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Alanine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, L-alanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, lysosome and peroxisome. L-Alanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Alanine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Alanine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into L-glutamic acid and pyruvic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme alanine aminotransferase 1. In addition, Hydroxypyruvic acid and L-alanine can be biosynthesized from pyruvic acid and L-serine through its interaction with the enzyme serine--pyruvate aminotransferase. In humans, L-alanine is involved in the transcription/translation pathway, the chloramphenicol action pathway, the clomocycline action pathway, and the selenoamino acid metabolism pathway. L-Alanine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway, Gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase deficiency, and the glutaminolysis and cancer pathway. Outside of the human body, L-alanine can be found in apple, blackcurrant, sour cherry, and tarragon. This makes L-alanine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. L-Alanine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Allothreonine ; HMDB0004041 L-Allothreonine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Allothreonine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Allothreonine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, L-allothreonine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. L-Allothreonine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
L-alpha-Aminobutyric acid ; HMDB0000452 , also known as L-butyrine or L-homoalanine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, feces, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, is primarily located in the cytoplasm. exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. can be converted into brivaracetam and L-2-amino-4-methoxy-cis-but-3-enoic acid.
L-Arabinose ; HMDB0000646 L-Arabinose, also known as L-arabinopyranose, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as pentoses. These are monosaccharides in which the carbohydrate moiety contains five carbon atoms. L-Arabinose exists as a solid, very soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Arabinose has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. L-Arabinose exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Arabinose has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including ribose-5-phosphate isomerase deficiency.
L-Arginine ; HMDB0000517 L-Arginine, also known as L-arg, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Arginine is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. L-Arginine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Arginine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and saliva. Within the cell, L-arginine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and myelin sheath. L-Arginine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Arginine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glycine and L-arginine can be converted into guanidoacetic acid and orotidylic acid through its interaction with the enzyme glycine amidinotransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Fumaric acid and L-arginine can be biosynthesized from argininosuccinic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme argininosuccinate lyase. Furthermore, L-Arginine can be converted into ornithine and urea through its interaction with the enzyme arginase-1. Finally, Fumaric acid and L-arginine can be biosynthesized from argininosuccinic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme argininosuccinate lyase. In humans, L-arginine is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway, the arginine and proline metabolism pathway, the transcription/translation pathway, and the glycine and serine metabolism pathway. L-Arginine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hypoacetylaspartia pathway, dimethylglycine dehydrogenase deficiency, the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway, and the prolinemia type II pathway. Outside of the human body, L-arginine can be found in a number of food items such as avocado, black-eyed pea, squashberry, and chinese water chestnut. This makes L-arginine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. L-Arginine is a potentially toxic compound. L-Arginine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as heart failure, myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia 1, and hyperlysinuria; l-arginine has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including propionic acidemia and cystinuria.
L-Arginine ; HMDB00517 L-Arginine, also known as L-arg, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Arginine is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. L-Arginine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Arginine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and saliva. Within the cell, L-arginine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and myelin sheath. L-Arginine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Arginine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Glycine and L-arginine can be converted into guanidoacetic acid and orotidylic acid through its interaction with the enzyme glycine amidinotransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Fumaric acid and L-arginine can be biosynthesized from argininosuccinic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme argininosuccinate lyase. Furthermore, L-Arginine can be converted into ornithine and urea through its interaction with the enzyme arginase-1. Finally, Fumaric acid and L-arginine can be biosynthesized from argininosuccinic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme argininosuccinate lyase. In humans, L-arginine is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway, the arginine and proline metabolism pathway, the transcription/translation pathway, and the glycine and serine metabolism pathway. L-Arginine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hypoacetylaspartia pathway, dimethylglycine dehydrogenase deficiency, the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway, and the prolinemia type II pathway. Outside of the human body, L-arginine can be found in a number of food items such as avocado, black-eyed pea, squashberry, and chinese water chestnut. This makes L-arginine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. L-Arginine is a potentially toxic compound. L-Arginine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as heart failure, myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia 1, and hyperlysinuria; l-arginine has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including propionic acidemia and cystinuria.
L-Asparagine ; HMDB0000168 L-Asparagine, also known as Asn or aspartamic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as asparagine and derivatives. Asparagine and derivatives are compounds containing asparagine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of asparagine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Asparagine is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. L-Asparagine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Asparagine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, sweat, cerebrospinal fluid, and breast milk. Within the cell, L-asparagine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Asparagine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Asparagine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Asparagine can be converted into L-aspartic acid through its interaction with the enzyme isoaspartyl peptidase/l-asparaginase. Furthermore, L-Asparagine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-aspartic acid and L-glutamine through its interaction with the enzyme asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing]. Furthermore, L-Asparagine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-aspartic acid and L-glutamine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing]. Finally, L-Asparagine can be converted into L-aspartic acid through the action of the enzyme isoaspartyl peptidase/l-asparaginase. In humans, L-asparagine is involved in the clarithromycin action pathway, the doxycycline action pathway, the azithromycin action pathway, and the streptomycin action pathway. L-Asparagine is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the hypoacetylaspartia pathway, the ammonia recycling pathway, and the canavan disease pathway. L-Asparagine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Asparagine ; HMDB00168 L-Asparagine, also known as Asn or aspartamic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as asparagine and derivatives. Asparagine and derivatives are compounds containing asparagine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of asparagine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Asparagine is a drug which is used for nutritional supplementation, also for treating dietary shortage or imbalance. L-Asparagine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Asparagine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, sweat, cerebrospinal fluid, and breast milk. Within the cell, L-asparagine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Asparagine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Asparagine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Asparagine can be converted into L-aspartic acid through its interaction with the enzyme isoaspartyl peptidase/l-asparaginase. Furthermore, L-Asparagine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-aspartic acid and L-glutamine through its interaction with the enzyme asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing]. Furthermore, L-Asparagine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-aspartic acid and L-glutamine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing]. Finally, L-Asparagine can be converted into L-aspartic acid through the action of the enzyme isoaspartyl peptidase/l-asparaginase. In humans, L-asparagine is involved in the clarithromycin action pathway, the doxycycline action pathway, the azithromycin action pathway, and the streptomycin action pathway. L-Asparagine is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the hypoacetylaspartia pathway, the ammonia recycling pathway, and the canavan disease pathway. L-Asparagine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Aspartic acid ; HMDB0000191 L-Aspartic acid, also known as L-aspartate or 2-aminosuccinate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aspartic acid and derivatives. Aspartic acid and derivatives are compounds containing an aspartic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of aspartic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Aspartic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Aspartic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, breast milk, saliva, and sweat. Within the cell, L-aspartic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Aspartic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Aspartic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Aspartic acid and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into oxalacetic acid and L-glutamic acid through its interaction with the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase, mitochondrial. In addition, 5-Amino-1-(5-phospho-D-ribosyl)imidazole-4-carboxylate and L-aspartic acid can be converted into saicar through its interaction with the enzyme multifunctional protein ADE2. In humans, L-aspartic acid is involved in the homocarnosinosis pathway, the aspartate metabolism pathway, the arginine and proline metabolism pathway, and the thioguanine action pathway. L-Aspartic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the canavan disease pathway, 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria/succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, and the hyperinsulinism-hyperammonemia syndrome pathway. Outside of the human body, L-aspartic acid can be found in a number of food items such as black elderberry, irish moss, black cabbage, and mammee apple. This makes L-aspartic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
L-Aspartic acid ; HMDB00191 L-Aspartic acid, also known as L-aspartate or 2-aminosuccinate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aspartic acid and derivatives. Aspartic acid and derivatives are compounds containing an aspartic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of aspartic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Aspartic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Aspartic acid has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, breast milk, saliva, and sweat. Within the cell, L-aspartic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Aspartic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Aspartic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Aspartic acid and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into oxalacetic acid and L-glutamic acid through its interaction with the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase, mitochondrial. In addition, 5-Amino-1-(5-phospho-D-ribosyl)imidazole-4-carboxylate and L-aspartic acid can be converted into saicar through its interaction with the enzyme multifunctional protein ADE2. In humans, L-aspartic acid is involved in the homocarnosinosis pathway, the aspartate metabolism pathway, the arginine and proline metabolism pathway, and the thioguanine action pathway. L-Aspartic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the canavan disease pathway, 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria/succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, and the hyperinsulinism-hyperammonemia syndrome pathway. Outside of the human body, L-aspartic acid can be found in a number of food items such as black elderberry, irish moss, black cabbage, and mammee apple. This makes L-aspartic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
L-Carnitine ; HMDB0000062 (R)-Carnitine, also known as carnitine or carnitor, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as carnitines. These are organic compounds containing the quaternary ammonium compound carnitine (R)-Carnitine is a drug which is used for treatment of primary systemic carnitine deficiency, a genetic impairment of normal biosynthesis or utilization of levocarnitine from dietary sources, or for the treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency resulting from an inborn error of metabolism such as glutaric aciduria ii, methyl malonic aciduria, propionic acidemia, and medium chain fatty acylcoa dehydrogenase deficiency. used therapeutically to stimulate gastric and pancreatic secretions and in the treatment of hyperlipoproteinemias. parenteral levocarnitine is indicated for the prevention and treatment of carnitine deficiency in patients with end-stage renal disease (R)-Carnitine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa) (R)-Carnitine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, urine, breast milk, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, (R)-carnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and peroxisome (R)-Carnitine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, (R)-carnitine is involved in carnitine synthesis pathway, the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway, the adrenoleukodystrophy, X-linked pathway, and the fatty acid metabolism pathway (R)-Carnitine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF short chain saturated fatty acids pathway, medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (mcad), short chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (scad deficiency), and very-long-chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (vlcad) (R)-Carnitine is a potentially toxic compound (R)-Carnitine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as myopathic carnitine deficiency, carnitine transporter defect; primary systemic carnitine deficiency, and long-chain fatty acids, defect in transport of; (r)-carnitine has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including propionic acidemia and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.
L-Carnitine ; HMDB00062 (R)-Carnitine, also known as carnitine or carnitor, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as carnitines. These are organic compounds containing the quaternary ammonium compound carnitine (R)-Carnitine is a drug which is used for treatment of primary systemic carnitine deficiency, a genetic impairment of normal biosynthesis or utilization of levocarnitine from dietary sources, or for the treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency resulting from an inborn error of metabolism such as glutaric aciduria ii, methyl malonic aciduria, propionic acidemia, and medium chain fatty acylcoa dehydrogenase deficiency. used therapeutically to stimulate gastric and pancreatic secretions and in the treatment of hyperlipoproteinemias. parenteral levocarnitine is indicated for the prevention and treatment of carnitine deficiency in patients with end-stage renal disease (R)-Carnitine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa) (R)-Carnitine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, urine, breast milk, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, (R)-carnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and peroxisome (R)-Carnitine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, (R)-carnitine is involved in carnitine synthesis pathway, the Beta oxidation OF very long chain fatty acids pathway, the adrenoleukodystrophy, X-linked pathway, and the fatty acid metabolism pathway (R)-Carnitine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF short chain saturated fatty acids pathway, medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (mcad), short chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (scad deficiency), and very-long-chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (vlcad) (R)-Carnitine is a potentially toxic compound (R)-Carnitine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as myopathic carnitine deficiency, carnitine transporter defect; primary systemic carnitine deficiency, and long-chain fatty acids, defect in transport of; (r)-carnitine has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including propionic acidemia and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency.
L-Cystathionine ; HMDB0000099 L-Cystathionine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-cysteine-s-conjugates. L-cysteine-S-conjugates are compounds containing L-cysteine where the thio-group is conjugated. L-Cystathionine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Cystathionine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-cystathionine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. L-Cystathionine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Cystathionine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Cystathionine can be biosynthesized from L-serine and homocysteine through its interaction with the enzyme cystathionine beta-synthase. Furthermore, L-Cystathionine can be converted into L-cysteine and 2-ketobutyric acid through its interaction with the enzyme cystathionine gamma-lyase. Furthermore, L-Cystathionine can be converted into L-cysteine and 2-ketobutyric acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme cystathionine gamma-lyase. Finally, L-Cystathionine can be biosynthesized from L-homoserine and L-serine through the action of the enzyme cystathionine beta-synthase. In humans, L-cystathionine is involved in the homocysteine degradation pathway, the glycine and serine metabolism pathway, and the methionine metabolism pathway. L-Cystathionine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the sarcosinemia pathway, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency (DHPD), the hyperglycinemia, non-ketotic pathway, and the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway. L-Cystathionine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as autism and alzheimer's disease; l-cystathionine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including cystathioninuria.
L-Cysteine ; HMDB0000574 L-Cysteine, also known as C or E920, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cysteine and derivatives. Cysteine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Cysteine is a drug which is used for the prevention of liver damage and kidney damage associated with overdoses of acetaminophen. L-Cysteine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Cysteine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, saliva, urine, and blood. Within the cell, L-cysteine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and myelin sheath. L-Cysteine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Cysteine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Glutamic acid and L-cysteine can be converted into Gamma-glutamylcysteine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glutamate--cysteine ligase. Furthermore, L-Cysteine and 2-ketobutyric acid can be biosynthesized from L-cystathionine; which is mediated by the enzyme cystathionine gamma-lyase. Furthermore, L-Cysteine and glycine can be biosynthesized from cysteinylglycine; which is catalyzed by the enzymes aminopeptidase N and caspase-7. Finally, L-Glutamic acid and L-cysteine can be converted into Gamma-glutamylcysteine through the action of the enzyme glutamate--cysteine ligase. In humans, L-cysteine is involved in the homocysteine degradation pathway, the glucose transporter defect (SGLT2) pathway, the cysteine metabolism pathway, and the metolazone action pathway. L-Cysteine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the chlorothiazide action pathway, the triamterene action pathway, cystathionine Beta-synthase deficiency, and homocystinuria, cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency. L-Cysteine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Cysteine ; HMDB00574 L-Cysteine, also known as C or E920, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cysteine and derivatives. Cysteine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Cysteine is a drug which is used for the prevention of liver damage and kidney damage associated with overdoses of acetaminophen. L-Cysteine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Cysteine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, saliva, urine, and blood. Within the cell, L-cysteine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and myelin sheath. L-Cysteine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Cysteine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Glutamic acid and L-cysteine can be converted into Gamma-glutamylcysteine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glutamate--cysteine ligase. Furthermore, L-Cysteine and 2-ketobutyric acid can be biosynthesized from L-cystathionine; which is mediated by the enzyme cystathionine gamma-lyase. Furthermore, L-Cysteine and glycine can be biosynthesized from cysteinylglycine; which is catalyzed by the enzymes aminopeptidase N and caspase-7. Finally, L-Glutamic acid and L-cysteine can be converted into Gamma-glutamylcysteine through the action of the enzyme glutamate--cysteine ligase. In humans, L-cysteine is involved in the homocysteine degradation pathway, the glucose transporter defect (SGLT2) pathway, the cysteine metabolism pathway, and the metolazone action pathway. L-Cysteine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the chlorothiazide action pathway, the triamterene action pathway, cystathionine Beta-synthase deficiency, and homocystinuria, cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency. L-Cysteine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Cystine ; HMDB0000192 L-Cystine, also known as L-dicysteine or E921, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-cysteine-s-conjugates. L-cysteine-S-conjugates are compounds containing L-cysteine where the thio-group is conjugated. L-Cystine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Cystine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-cystine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. L-Cystine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Cystine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, schizophrenia, hyperlysinuria, and parkinson's disease; l-cystine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including cystinuria.
L-Cystine ; HMDB00192 L-Cystine, also known as L-dicysteine or E921, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-cysteine-s-conjugates. L-cysteine-S-conjugates are compounds containing L-cysteine where the thio-group is conjugated. L-Cystine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Cystine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-cystine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. L-Cystine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Cystine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, schizophrenia, hyperlysinuria, and parkinson's disease; l-cystine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including cystinuria.
L-Fucose ; HMDB0000174 Rhamnose, also known as L-rha or 6-deoxymannose, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hexoses. These are monosaccharides in which the sugar unit is a is a six-carbon containing moeity. Rhamnose exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Rhamnose has been primarily detected in feces. Within the cell, rhamnose is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
L-Fucose ; HMDB00174 Rhamnose, also known as L-rha or 6-deoxymannose, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as hexoses. These are monosaccharides in which the sugar unit is a is a six-carbon containing moeity. Rhamnose exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Rhamnose has been primarily detected in feces. Within the cell, rhamnose is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
L-Glutamic acid ; HMDB0000148 L-Glutamic acid, also known as glutamate or acido glutamico, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Glutamic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Glutamic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, cerebrospinal fluid, feces, and saliva. L-Glutamic acid can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in myelin sheath, lysosome, endoplasmic reticulum, and cytoplasm. L-Glutamic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Glutamic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Allysine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from saccharopine; which is mediated by the enzyme Alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde synthase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Oxoadipic acid and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from aminoadipic acid and oxoglutaric acid through the action of the enzyme kynurenine/alpha-aminoadipate aminotransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, L-Glutamic acid can be converted into L-glutamine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glutamine synthetase. Furthermore, L-Glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-glutamine; which is mediated by the enzyme glutaminase liver isoform, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Alpha-Ketoisovaleric acid and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-valine and oxoglutaric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. Finally, Ketoleucine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-leucine and oxoglutaric acid through its interaction with the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In humans, L-glutamic acid is involved in the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway, the aspartate metabolism pathway, the nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism pathway, and the antrafenine action pathway. L-Glutamic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the gout or kelley-seegmiller syndrome pathway, the glutaric aciduria type I pathway, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency (DHPD), and dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency. Outside of the human body, L-glutamic acid can be found in a number of food items such as common cabbage, bitter gourd, avocado, and italian oregano. This makes L-glutamic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. L-Glutamic acid is a potentially toxic compound. L-Glutamic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as heart failure, anoxia, leukemia, and dicarboxylic aminoaciduria; l-glutamic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including n-acetylglutamate synthetase deficiency.
L-Glutamic acid ; HMDB00148 L-Glutamic acid, also known as glutamate or acido glutamico, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Glutamic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Glutamic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, cerebrospinal fluid, feces, and saliva. L-Glutamic acid can be found anywhere throughout the human cell, such as in myelin sheath, lysosome, endoplasmic reticulum, and cytoplasm. L-Glutamic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Glutamic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Allysine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from saccharopine; which is mediated by the enzyme Alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde synthase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Oxoadipic acid and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from aminoadipic acid and oxoglutaric acid through the action of the enzyme kynurenine/alpha-aminoadipate aminotransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, L-Glutamic acid can be converted into L-glutamine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme glutamine synthetase. Furthermore, L-Glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-glutamine; which is mediated by the enzyme glutaminase liver isoform, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Alpha-Ketoisovaleric acid and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-valine and oxoglutaric acid; which is mediated by the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. Finally, Ketoleucine and L-glutamic acid can be biosynthesized from L-leucine and oxoglutaric acid through its interaction with the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In humans, L-glutamic acid is involved in the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway, the aspartate metabolism pathway, the nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism pathway, and the antrafenine action pathway. L-Glutamic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the gout or kelley-seegmiller syndrome pathway, the glutaric aciduria type I pathway, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency (DHPD), and dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency. Outside of the human body, L-glutamic acid can be found in a number of food items such as common cabbage, bitter gourd, avocado, and italian oregano. This makes L-glutamic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. L-Glutamic acid is a potentially toxic compound. L-Glutamic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as heart failure, anoxia, leukemia, and dicarboxylic aminoaciduria; l-glutamic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including n-acetylglutamate synthetase deficiency.
L-Glutamine ; HMDB0000641
L-Glutamine ; HMDB00641
L-Histidine ; HMDB0000177 L-Histidine, also known as H, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as histidine and derivatives. Histidine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Histidine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Histidine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, urine, sweat, and blood. Within the cell, L-histidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Histidine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Histidine can be converted into urocanic acid through its interaction with the enzyme histidine ammonia-lyase. In humans, L-histidine is involved in the kanamycin action pathway, the Beta-alanine metabolism pathway, the minocycline action pathway, and the amikacin action pathway. L-Histidine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the carnosinuria, carnosinemia pathway, the histidinemia pathway, gaba-transaminase deficiency, and the ammonia recycling pathway. L-Histidine is a potentially toxic compound. L-Histidine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as pyridoxamine 5-prime-phosphate oxidase deficiency, alzheimer's disease, and dengue fever; l-histidine has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including propionic acidemia and tyrosinemia I.
L-Histidine ; HMDB00177 L-Histidine, also known as H, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as histidine and derivatives. Histidine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Histidine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Histidine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, urine, sweat, and blood. Within the cell, L-histidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Histidine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Histidine can be converted into urocanic acid through its interaction with the enzyme histidine ammonia-lyase. In humans, L-histidine is involved in the kanamycin action pathway, the Beta-alanine metabolism pathway, the minocycline action pathway, and the amikacin action pathway. L-Histidine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the carnosinuria, carnosinemia pathway, the histidinemia pathway, gaba-transaminase deficiency, and the ammonia recycling pathway. L-Histidine is a potentially toxic compound. L-Histidine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as pyridoxamine 5-prime-phosphate oxidase deficiency, alzheimer's disease, and dengue fever; l-histidine has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including propionic acidemia and tyrosinemia I.
L-Isoleucine ; HMDB0000172 , also known as I or 2S,3S-isoleucine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as isoleucine and derivatives. Isoleucine and derivatives are compounds containing isoleucine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of isoleucine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, sweat, breast milk, and saliva. Within the cell, is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, is involved in the clarithromycin action pathway, the kanamycin action pathway, the doxycycline action pathway, and the azithromycin action pathway. is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency type I, methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, and the isovaleric aciduria pathway. is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Isoleucine ; HMDB00172 , also known as I or 2S,3S-isoleucine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as isoleucine and derivatives. Isoleucine and derivatives are compounds containing isoleucine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of isoleucine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. Thus, is considered to be a fatty acid lipid molecule. exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, sweat, breast milk, and saliva. Within the cell, is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, is involved in the clarithromycin action pathway, the kanamycin action pathway, the doxycycline action pathway, and the azithromycin action pathway. is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency type I, methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, and the isovaleric aciduria pathway. is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Kynurenine ; HMDB0000684 L-Kynurenine, also known as quinurenine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alkyl-phenylketones. These are aromatic compounds containing a ketone substituted by one alkyl group, and a phenyl group. L-Kynurenine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Kynurenine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-kynurenine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Kynurenine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Kynurenine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Kynurenine and formic acid can be biosynthesized from n'-formylkynurenine; which is mediated by the enzyme kynurenine formamidase. Furthermore, L-Kynurenine can be converted into 2-aminobenzoic acid and L-alanine; which is mediated by the enzyme kynureninase. Furthermore, Formic acid and L-kynurenine can be biosynthesized from n'-formylkynurenine through its interaction with the enzyme kynurenine formamidase. Furthermore, L-Kynurenine can be converted into 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Furthermore, L-Kynurenine can be converted into 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Finally, Formic acid and L-kynurenine can be biosynthesized from n'-formylkynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynurenine formamidase. In humans, L-kynurenine is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway.
L-Kynurenine ; HMDB00684 L-Kynurenine, also known as quinurenine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alkyl-phenylketones. These are aromatic compounds containing a ketone substituted by one alkyl group, and a phenyl group. L-Kynurenine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Kynurenine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in feces, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-kynurenine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Kynurenine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Kynurenine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Kynurenine and formic acid can be biosynthesized from n'-formylkynurenine; which is mediated by the enzyme kynurenine formamidase. Furthermore, L-Kynurenine can be converted into 2-aminobenzoic acid and L-alanine; which is mediated by the enzyme kynureninase. Furthermore, Formic acid and L-kynurenine can be biosynthesized from n'-formylkynurenine through its interaction with the enzyme kynurenine formamidase. Furthermore, L-Kynurenine can be converted into 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Furthermore, L-Kynurenine can be converted into 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Finally, Formic acid and L-kynurenine can be biosynthesized from n'-formylkynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme kynurenine formamidase. In humans, L-kynurenine is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway.
L-Lactic acid ; HMDB0000190 D-Lactic acid, also known as lactate or D-milchsaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the adjacent carbon. D-Lactic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Lactic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, D-lactic acid is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. D-Lactic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. D-Lactic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, D-Lactic acid can be converted into pyruvic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme probable D-lactate dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Glutathione and D-lactic acid can be biosynthesized from S-lactoylglutathione; which is catalyzed by the enzyme hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, D-Lactic acid can be converted into pyruvic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme probable D-lactate dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. Finally, Glutathione and D-lactic acid can be biosynthesized from S-lactoylglutathione; which is catalyzed by the enzyme hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, mitochondrial. In humans, D-lactic acid is involved in the pyruvate metabolism pathway and the pyruvaldehyde degradation pathway. D-Lactic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include pyruvate kinase deficiency, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency, pyruvate decarboxylase E1 component deficiency (pdhe1 deficiency), and the primary hyperoxaluria II, PH2 pathway. Outside of the human body, D-lactic acid can be found in a number of food items such as cucurbita (gourd), cereals and cereal products, capers, and cloud ear fungus. This makes D-lactic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. D-Lactic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Lactic acid ; HMDB00190 D-Lactic acid, also known as lactate or D-milchsaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha hydroxy acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the adjacent carbon. D-Lactic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). D-Lactic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, D-lactic acid is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. D-Lactic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. D-Lactic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, D-Lactic acid can be converted into pyruvic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme probable D-lactate dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Glutathione and D-lactic acid can be biosynthesized from S-lactoylglutathione; which is catalyzed by the enzyme hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, D-Lactic acid can be converted into pyruvic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme probable D-lactate dehydrogenase, mitochondrial. Finally, Glutathione and D-lactic acid can be biosynthesized from S-lactoylglutathione; which is catalyzed by the enzyme hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase, mitochondrial. In humans, D-lactic acid is involved in the pyruvate metabolism pathway and the pyruvaldehyde degradation pathway. D-Lactic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include pyruvate kinase deficiency, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency, pyruvate decarboxylase E1 component deficiency (pdhe1 deficiency), and the primary hyperoxaluria II, PH2 pathway. Outside of the human body, D-lactic acid can be found in a number of food items such as cucurbita (gourd), cereals and cereal products, capers, and cloud ear fungus. This makes D-lactic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. D-Lactic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Leucine ; HMDB0000687 L-Leucine, also known as (S)-leucine or L-leucin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as leucine and derivatives. Leucine and derivatives are compounds containing leucine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of leucine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Leucine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Leucine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, sweat, blood, and saliva. Within the cell, L-leucine is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. L-Leucine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Leucine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into ketoleucine and L-glutamic acid through its interaction with the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In humans, L-leucine is involved in the methacycline action pathway, the telithromycin action pathway, the josamycin action pathway, and the neomycin action pathway. L-Leucine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV pathway, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I pathway, 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, and the isovaleric acidemia pathway. L-Leucine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Leucine ; HMDB00687 L-Leucine, also known as (S)-leucine or L-leucin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as leucine and derivatives. Leucine and derivatives are compounds containing leucine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of leucine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Leucine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Leucine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, sweat, blood, and saliva. Within the cell, L-leucine is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. L-Leucine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Leucine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into ketoleucine and L-glutamic acid through its interaction with the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In humans, L-leucine is involved in the methacycline action pathway, the telithromycin action pathway, the josamycin action pathway, and the neomycin action pathway. L-Leucine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type IV pathway, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I pathway, 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, and the isovaleric acidemia pathway. L-Leucine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Lysine ; HMDB0000182 L-Lysine, also known as (S)-lysine or L-lysin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Lysine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Lysine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, sweat, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-lysine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus and peroxisome. L-Lysine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Lysine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Lysine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into saccharopine; which is mediated by the enzyme Alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde synthase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, L-Lysine can be converted into L-lysine through its interaction with the enzyme low affinity cationic amino acid transporter 2. Finally, L-Lysine and S-adenosylmethionine can be converted into N6,N6,N6-trimethyl-L-lysine and S-adenosylhomocysteine; which is mediated by the enzyme histone-lysine N-methyltransferase SETD7. In humans, L-lysine is involved in the biotin metabolism pathway, the lysine degradation pathway, carnitine synthesis pathway, and the pyridoxine dependency with seizures pathway. L-Lysine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hyperlysinemia II or saccharopinuria pathway, the saccharopinuria/hyperlysinemia II pathway, the glutaric aciduria type I pathway, and the hyperlysinemia I, familial pathway. L-Lysine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, leukemia, schizophrenia, and lipoyltransferase 1 deficiency; l-lysine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including tyrosinemia I.
L-Lysine ; HMDB00182 L-Lysine, also known as (S)-lysine or L-lysin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Lysine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Lysine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, sweat, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-lysine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus and peroxisome. L-Lysine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Lysine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Lysine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into saccharopine; which is mediated by the enzyme Alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde synthase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, L-Lysine can be converted into L-lysine through its interaction with the enzyme low affinity cationic amino acid transporter 2. Finally, L-Lysine and S-adenosylmethionine can be converted into N6,N6,N6-trimethyl-L-lysine and S-adenosylhomocysteine; which is mediated by the enzyme histone-lysine N-methyltransferase SETD7. In humans, L-lysine is involved in the biotin metabolism pathway, the lysine degradation pathway, carnitine synthesis pathway, and the pyridoxine dependency with seizures pathway. L-Lysine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hyperlysinemia II or saccharopinuria pathway, the saccharopinuria/hyperlysinemia II pathway, the glutaric aciduria type I pathway, and the hyperlysinemia I, familial pathway. L-Lysine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, leukemia, schizophrenia, and lipoyltransferase 1 deficiency; l-lysine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including tyrosinemia I.
L-Malic acid ; HMDB0000156 (S)-Malic acid, also known as malate or L-apple acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom (S)-Malic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa) (S)-Malic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, urine, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, (S)-malic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria (S)-Malic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, (S)-malic acid is involved in the oncogenic action OF 2-hydroxyglutarate pathway, the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway, the congenital lactic acidosis pathway, and the citric Acid cycle pathway (S)-Malic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (e3), the transfer OF acetyl groups into mitochondria pathway, the primary hyperoxaluria II, PH2 pathway, and pyruvate decarboxylase E1 component deficiency (pdhe1 deficiency).
L-Malic acid ; HMDB00156 (S)-Malic acid, also known as malate or L-apple acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom (S)-Malic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa) (S)-Malic acid has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, urine, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, (S)-malic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria (S)-Malic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, (S)-malic acid is involved in the oncogenic action OF 2-hydroxyglutarate pathway, the oncogenic action OF fumarate pathway, the congenital lactic acidosis pathway, and the citric Acid cycle pathway (S)-Malic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (e3), the transfer OF acetyl groups into mitochondria pathway, the primary hyperoxaluria II, PH2 pathway, and pyruvate decarboxylase E1 component deficiency (pdhe1 deficiency).
L-Methionine ; HMDB0000696 L-Methionine, also known as liquimeth or pedameth, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methionine and derivatives. Methionine and derivatives are compounds containing methionine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of methionine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Methionine is a drug which is used for protein synthesis including the formation of same, l-homocysteine, l-cysteine, taurine, and sulfate. L-Methionine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Methionine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, L-methionine is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. L-Methionine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Dimethylglycine and L-methionine can be biosynthesized from betaine and homocysteine; which is mediated by the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. In humans, L-methionine is involved in spermidine and spermine biosynthesis pathway, the arbekacin action pathway, the lincomycin action pathway, and the tobramycin action pathway. L-Methionine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency, cystathionine Beta-synthase deficiency, the hypermethioninemia pathway, and the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway. L-Methionine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Methionine ; HMDB00696 L-Methionine, also known as liquimeth or pedameth, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methionine and derivatives. Methionine and derivatives are compounds containing methionine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of methionine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Methionine is a drug which is used for protein synthesis including the formation of same, l-homocysteine, l-cysteine, taurine, and sulfate. L-Methionine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Methionine has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and blood. Within the cell, L-methionine is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. L-Methionine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Dimethylglycine and L-methionine can be biosynthesized from betaine and homocysteine; which is mediated by the enzyme betaine--homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1. In humans, L-methionine is involved in spermidine and spermine biosynthesis pathway, the arbekacin action pathway, the lincomycin action pathway, and the tobramycin action pathway. L-Methionine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include S-adenosylhomocysteine (sah) hydrolase deficiency, cystathionine Beta-synthase deficiency, the hypermethioninemia pathway, and the homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia due to defect in cobalamin metabolism, CBLG complementation type pathway. L-Methionine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Octanoylcarnitine ; HMDB0000791 , also known as octanoylcarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and mitochondria. In humans, is involved in the metabolic disorder called the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF short chain saturated fatty acids pathway. has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease and glutaric aciduria II.
L-Octanoylcarnitine ; HMDB00791 , also known as octanoylcarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and mitochondria. In humans, is involved in the metabolic disorder called the mitochondrial Beta-oxidation OF short chain saturated fatty acids pathway. has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease and glutaric aciduria II.
L-Palmitoylcarnitine ; HMDB0000222 Palmitoylcarnitine, also known as hexadecanoylcarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, palmitoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Palmitoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Palmitoylcarnitine has been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, palmitoylcarnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and mitochondria. Palmitoylcarnitine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, palmitoylcarnitine is involved in the fatty acid metabolism pathway. Palmitoylcarnitine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include short chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (scad deficiency), medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (mcad), trifunctional protein deficiency, and the ethylmalonic encephalopathy pathway. Palmitoylcarnitine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease.
L-Palmitoylcarnitine ; HMDB00222 Palmitoylcarnitine, also known as hexadecanoylcarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, palmitoylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Palmitoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Palmitoylcarnitine has been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, palmitoylcarnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and mitochondria. Palmitoylcarnitine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, palmitoylcarnitine is involved in the fatty acid metabolism pathway. Palmitoylcarnitine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include short chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (scad deficiency), medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (mcad), trifunctional protein deficiency, and the ethylmalonic encephalopathy pathway. Palmitoylcarnitine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including celiac disease.
L-Phenylalanine ; HMDB0000159 L-Phenylalanine, also known as F or endorphenyl, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylalanine and derivatives. Phenylalanine and derivatives are compounds containing phenylalanine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of phenylalanine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Phenylalanine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Phenylalanine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and sweat. Within the cell, L-phenylalanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Phenylalanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Phenylalanine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Phenylalanine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into phenylpyruvic acid and L-glutamic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase, cytoplasmic. In addition, L-Phenylalanine can be converted into phenylpyruvic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme L-amino-acid oxidase. In humans, L-phenylalanine is involved in the transcription/translation pathway and the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway. L-Phenylalanine is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the tyrosinemia type 3 (tyro3) pathway, the tyrosinemia type 2 (or richner-hanhart syndrome) pathway, and the phenylketonuria pathway. Outside of the human body, L-phenylalanine can be found in watermelon. This makes L-phenylalanine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. L-Phenylalanine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Phenylalanine ; HMDB00159 L-Phenylalanine, also known as F or endorphenyl, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylalanine and derivatives. Phenylalanine and derivatives are compounds containing phenylalanine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of phenylalanine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Phenylalanine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Phenylalanine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and sweat. Within the cell, L-phenylalanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Phenylalanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Phenylalanine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Phenylalanine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into phenylpyruvic acid and L-glutamic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase, cytoplasmic. In addition, L-Phenylalanine can be converted into phenylpyruvic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme L-amino-acid oxidase. In humans, L-phenylalanine is involved in the transcription/translation pathway and the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway. L-Phenylalanine is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the tyrosinemia type 3 (tyro3) pathway, the tyrosinemia type 2 (or richner-hanhart syndrome) pathway, and the phenylketonuria pathway. Outside of the human body, L-phenylalanine can be found in watermelon. This makes L-phenylalanine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. L-Phenylalanine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Pipecolic acid ; HMDB0000716 L-Pipecolic acid, also known as (S)-pipecolate or L-homoproline, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Pipecolic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Pipecolic acid has been found in human liver tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, L-pipecolic acid is primarily located in the peroxisome. L-Pipecolic acid can be converted into (S)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropiperidine-2-carboxylate through the action of the enzyme peroxisomal sarcosine oxidase. In humans, L-pipecolic acid is involved in the lysine degradation pathway and the pyridoxine dependency with seizures pathway. L-Pipecolic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the glutaric aciduria type I pathway, the hyperlysinemia I, familial pathway, the 2-aminoadipic 2-oxoadipic aciduria pathway, and the hyperlysinemia II or saccharopinuria pathway. Outside of the human body, L-pipecolic acid can be found in a number of food items such as natal plum, sacred lotus, redcurrant, and chinese cinnamon. This makes L-pipecolic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. L-Pipecolic acid has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including peroxisomal biogenesis defect and adrenoleukodystrophy.
L-Pipecolic acid ; HMDB00716 L-Pipecolic acid, also known as (S)-pipecolate or L-homoproline, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Pipecolic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Pipecolic acid has been found in human liver tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, L-pipecolic acid is primarily located in the peroxisome. L-Pipecolic acid can be converted into (S)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydropiperidine-2-carboxylate through the action of the enzyme peroxisomal sarcosine oxidase. In humans, L-pipecolic acid is involved in the lysine degradation pathway and the pyridoxine dependency with seizures pathway. L-Pipecolic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the glutaric aciduria type I pathway, the hyperlysinemia I, familial pathway, the 2-aminoadipic 2-oxoadipic aciduria pathway, and the hyperlysinemia II or saccharopinuria pathway. Outside of the human body, L-pipecolic acid can be found in a number of food items such as natal plum, sacred lotus, redcurrant, and chinese cinnamon. This makes L-pipecolic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. L-Pipecolic acid has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including peroxisomal biogenesis defect and adrenoleukodystrophy.
L-Proline ; HMDB0000162 L-Proline, also known as L-prolin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as proline and derivatives. Proline and derivatives are compounds containing proline or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of proline at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Proline exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Proline has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, and blood. Within the cell, L-proline is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, lysosome and endoplasmic reticulum. L-Proline exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Proline participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Proline can be biosynthesized from 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid through the action of the enzyme proline dehydrogenase 1, mitochondrial. In addition, L-Proline can be converted into 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 2. In humans, L-proline is involved in the neomycin action pathway, the lymecycline action pathway, the netilmicin action pathway, and the clarithromycin action pathway. L-Proline is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency, arginine: glycine amidinotransferase deficiency (agat deficiency), and the hyperprolinemia type II pathway. L-Proline is a potentially toxic compound. L-Proline has been found to be associated with several diseases known as dicarboxylic aminoaciduria, alzheimer's disease, and hemodialysis; l-proline has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including glutathione synthetase deficiency and iminoglycinuria.
L-Proline ; HMDB00162 L-Proline, also known as L-prolin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as proline and derivatives. Proline and derivatives are compounds containing proline or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of proline at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Proline exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Proline has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, cerebrospinal fluid, breast milk, and blood. Within the cell, L-proline is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, lysosome and endoplasmic reticulum. L-Proline exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Proline participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Proline can be biosynthesized from 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid through the action of the enzyme proline dehydrogenase 1, mitochondrial. In addition, L-Proline can be converted into 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 2. In humans, L-proline is involved in the neomycin action pathway, the lymecycline action pathway, the netilmicin action pathway, and the clarithromycin action pathway. L-Proline is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include creatine deficiency, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency, L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency, arginine: glycine amidinotransferase deficiency (agat deficiency), and the hyperprolinemia type II pathway. L-Proline is a potentially toxic compound. L-Proline has been found to be associated with several diseases known as dicarboxylic aminoaciduria, alzheimer's disease, and hemodialysis; l-proline has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including glutathione synthetase deficiency and iminoglycinuria.
L-Serine ; HMDB0000187 L-Serine, also known as (S)-serine or L-ser, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as serine and derivatives. Serine and derivatives are compounds containing serine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of serine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Serine is a drug which is used as a natural moisturizing agent in some cosmetics and skin care products. L-Serine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Serine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, sweat, and saliva. Within the cell, L-serine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and peroxisome. L-Serine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Serine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Tetrahydrofolic acid and L-serine can be biosynthesized from 5,10-methylene-THF and glycine through the action of the enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Pyruvic acid and L-serine can be converted into hydroxypyruvic acid and L-alanine through its interaction with the enzyme serine--pyruvate aminotransferase. Furthermore, L-Serine can be converted into pyruvic acid through the action of the enzyme L-serine dehydratase/l-threonine deaminase. Finally, Tetrahydrofolic acid and L-serine can be converted into 5,10-methylene-THF, glycine, and water; which is catalyzed by the enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase, cytosolic. In humans, L-serine is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/18:1(11Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/16:0) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(14:0/24:0) pathway, and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:1(9Z)/18:0) pathway. L-Serine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, the gaucher disease pathway, the hypermethioninemia pathway, and Gamma-cystathionase deficiency (CTH). L-Serine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Serine ; HMDB00187 L-Serine, also known as (S)-serine or L-ser, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as serine and derivatives. Serine and derivatives are compounds containing serine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of serine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Serine is a drug which is used as a natural moisturizing agent in some cosmetics and skin care products. L-Serine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Serine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, sweat, and saliva. Within the cell, L-serine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and peroxisome. L-Serine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Serine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Tetrahydrofolic acid and L-serine can be biosynthesized from 5,10-methylene-THF and glycine through the action of the enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase, mitochondrial. Furthermore, Pyruvic acid and L-serine can be converted into hydroxypyruvic acid and L-alanine through its interaction with the enzyme serine--pyruvate aminotransferase. Furthermore, L-Serine can be converted into pyruvic acid through the action of the enzyme L-serine dehydratase/l-threonine deaminase. Finally, Tetrahydrofolic acid and L-serine can be converted into 5,10-methylene-THF, glycine, and water; which is catalyzed by the enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase, cytosolic. In humans, L-serine is involved in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/18:1(11Z)) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/16:0) pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(14:0/24:0) pathway, and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis pe(16:1(9Z)/18:0) pathway. L-Serine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the NON ketotic hyperglycinemia pathway, the gaucher disease pathway, the hypermethioninemia pathway, and Gamma-cystathionase deficiency (CTH). L-Serine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Targinine ; HMDB0029416 L-Targinine, also known as L-nmma or targinina, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as arginine and derivatives. Arginine and derivatives are compounds containing arginine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of arginine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Targinine is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Targinine has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, L-targinine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, L-targinine can be found in pulses. This makes L-targinine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
L-Targinine ; HMDB29416 L-Targinine, also known as L-nmma or targinina, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as arginine and derivatives. Arginine and derivatives are compounds containing arginine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of arginine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Targinine is slightly soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Targinine has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, L-targinine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, L-targinine can be found in pulses. This makes L-targinine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
L-Theanine ; HMDB0034365 L-Theanine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamine and derivatives. Glutamine and derivatives are compounds containing glutamine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Theanine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Theanine has been primarily detected in saliva. Within the cell, L-theanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm.
L-Threonine ; HMDB0000167 L-Threonine, also known as (2S)-threonine or L threonine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Threonine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Threonine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, feces, breast milk, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-threonine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Threonine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, L-threonine is involved in the threonine and 2-oxobutanoate degradation pathway, the gentamicin action pathway, the clindamycin action pathway, and the erythromycin action pathway. L-Threonine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Threonine ; HMDB00167 L-Threonine, also known as (2S)-threonine or L threonine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. L-Threonine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Threonine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, feces, breast milk, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, L-threonine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Threonine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, L-threonine is involved in the threonine and 2-oxobutanoate degradation pathway, the gentamicin action pathway, the clindamycin action pathway, and the erythromycin action pathway. L-Threonine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Tryptophan ; HMDB0000929 L-Tryptophan, also known as Trp or W, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. Indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an indole ring. L-Tryptophan exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Tryptophan has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, urine, feces, and blood. Within the cell, L-tryptophan is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. L-Tryptophan exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Tryptophan participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Tryptophan can be converted into n'-formylkynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. Furthermore, L-Tryptophan and tetrahydrobiopterin can be converted into 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan and 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin; which is mediated by the enzyme tryptophan 5-hydroxylase 1. Furthermore, L-Tryptophan can be biosynthesized from L-serine and indole through the action of the enzyme tryptophan synthase. Finally, L-Tryptophan can be converted into n'-formylkynurenine through the action of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. In humans, L-tryptophan is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway and the transcription/translation pathway. L-Tryptophan is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Tryptophan ; HMDB00929 L-Tryptophan, also known as Trp or W, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. Indolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an indole ring. L-Tryptophan exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Tryptophan has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, urine, feces, and blood. Within the cell, L-tryptophan is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. L-Tryptophan exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Tryptophan participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Tryptophan can be converted into n'-formylkynurenine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. Furthermore, L-Tryptophan and tetrahydrobiopterin can be converted into 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan and 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin; which is mediated by the enzyme tryptophan 5-hydroxylase 1. Furthermore, L-Tryptophan can be biosynthesized from L-serine and indole through the action of the enzyme tryptophan synthase. Finally, L-Tryptophan can be converted into n'-formylkynurenine through the action of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. In humans, L-tryptophan is involved in the tryptophan metabolism pathway and the transcription/translation pathway. L-Tryptophan is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Tyrosine ; HMDB0000158 L-Tyrosine, also known as (S)-tyrosine or para tyrosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tyrosine and derivatives. Tyrosine and derivatives are compounds containing tyrosine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of tyrosine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Tyrosine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Tyrosine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, feces, and blood. Within the cell, L-tyrosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Tyrosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Tyrosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Tyrosine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid and L-glutamic acid through the action of the enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase. Furthermore, L-Tyrosine can be converted into tyramine through the action of the enzyme aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase. Finally, L-Tyrosine and sapropterin can be converted into L-dopa and dihydrobiopterin through the action of the enzyme tyrosine 3-monooxygenase. In humans, L-tyrosine is involved in thyroid hormone synthesis pathway, the tyrosine metabolism pathway, the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway, and the disulfiram action pathway. L-Tyrosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hawkinsinuria pathway, the tyrosinemia type I pathway, the tyrosinemia type 3 (tyro3) pathway, and aromatic L-aminoacid decarboxylase deficiency. L-Tyrosine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Tyrosine ; HMDB00158 L-Tyrosine, also known as (S)-tyrosine or para tyrosine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tyrosine and derivatives. Tyrosine and derivatives are compounds containing tyrosine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of tyrosine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Tyrosine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Tyrosine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, feces, and blood. Within the cell, L-tyrosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. L-Tyrosine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Tyrosine participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, L-Tyrosine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid and L-glutamic acid through the action of the enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase. Furthermore, L-Tyrosine can be converted into tyramine through the action of the enzyme aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase. Finally, L-Tyrosine and sapropterin can be converted into L-dopa and dihydrobiopterin through the action of the enzyme tyrosine 3-monooxygenase. In humans, L-tyrosine is involved in thyroid hormone synthesis pathway, the tyrosine metabolism pathway, the phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism pathway, and the disulfiram action pathway. L-Tyrosine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hawkinsinuria pathway, the tyrosinemia type I pathway, the tyrosinemia type 3 (tyro3) pathway, and aromatic L-aminoacid decarboxylase deficiency. L-Tyrosine is a potentially toxic compound.
L-Urobilin ; HMDB0004159 L-Urobilin, also known as L-stercobilin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. L-Urobilin exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. L-Urobilin has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, L-urobilin is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
L-Urobilin ; HMDB04159 L-Urobilin, also known as L-stercobilin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as bilirubins. These are organic compounds containing a dicarboxylic acyclic tetrapyrrole derivative. L-Urobilin exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. L-Urobilin has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, L-urobilin is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
L-Valine ; HMDB0000883 L-Valine, also known as (S)-valine or L-valin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as valine and derivatives. Valine and derivatives are compounds containing valine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of valine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Valine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Valine has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, sweat, urine, and saliva. Within the cell, L-valine is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. L-Valine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Valine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into Alpha-ketoisovaleric acid and L-glutamic acid through the action of the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In humans, L-valine is involved in the doxycycline action pathway, the tobramycin action pathway, the clindamycin action pathway, and the minocycline action pathway. L-Valine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the maple syrup urine disease pathway, 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency type I, Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, and the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I pathway. Outside of the human body, L-valine can be found in watermelon. This makes L-valine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. L-Valine is a potentially toxic compound. L-Valine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as lipoyltransferase 1 deficiency, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency, paraquat poisoning, and lung cancer; l-valine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hypervalinemia.
L-Valine ; HMDB00883 L-Valine, also known as (S)-valine or L-valin, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as valine and derivatives. Valine and derivatives are compounds containing valine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of valine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. L-Valine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). L-Valine has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, sweat, urine, and saliva. Within the cell, L-valine is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm. L-Valine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. L-Valine and oxoglutaric acid can be converted into Alpha-ketoisovaleric acid and L-glutamic acid through the action of the enzyme branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase, cytosolic. In humans, L-valine is involved in the doxycycline action pathway, the tobramycin action pathway, the clindamycin action pathway, and the minocycline action pathway. L-Valine is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the maple syrup urine disease pathway, 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency type I, Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, and the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type I pathway. Outside of the human body, L-valine can be found in watermelon. This makes L-valine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product. L-Valine is a potentially toxic compound. L-Valine has been found to be associated with several diseases known as lipoyltransferase 1 deficiency, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency, paraquat poisoning, and lung cancer; l-valine has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including hypervalinemia.
Lenticin ; HMDB0061115 Lenticin, also known as glyyunnanenine or L-hypaphorine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-alpha-amino acids. These are alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. Lenticin is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lenticin has been primarily detected in feces.
Leucyl-Alanine ; HMDB0028922 Leucyl-alanine, also known as L-a dipeptide or leu-ala, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dipeptides. These are organic compounds containing a sequence of exactly two alpha-amino acids joined by a peptide bond. Leucyl-alanine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Leucyl-alanine has been primarily detected in feces.
Levulinic acid ; HMDB0000720 Levulinic acid, also known as laevulinsaeure or levulate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma-keto acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing an aldehyde substituted with a keto group on the C4 carbon atom. Levulinic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Levulinic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, urine, and blood. Within the cell, levulinic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Levulinic acid can be converted into 5-aminolevulinic acid. Levulinic acid is a sweet, acetoin, and acidic tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as alcoholic beverages, cereals and cereal products, fruits, and green vegetables. This makes levulinic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Levulinic acid ; HMDB00720 Levulinic acid, also known as laevulinsaeure or levulate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma-keto acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing an aldehyde substituted with a keto group on the C4 carbon atom. Levulinic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Levulinic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, urine, and blood. Within the cell, levulinic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Levulinic acid can be converted into 5-aminolevulinic acid. Levulinic acid is a sweet, acetoin, and acidic tasting compound that can be found in a number of food items such as alcoholic beverages, cereals and cereal products, fruits, and green vegetables. This makes levulinic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Linoleic acid ; HMDB0000673 Linoleic acid, also known as LA or linoleate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Linoleic acid exists as a liquid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Linoleic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and feces. Within the cell, linoleic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and myelin sheath. Linoleic acid can be converted into Gamma-linolenic acid through the action of the enzyme fatty acid desaturase 2. In humans, linoleic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, linoleic acid can be found in a number of food items such as jujube, star fruit, winter savory, and black mulberry. This makes linoleic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Linoleic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Linoleic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as schizophrenia, thyroid cancer, cirrhosis, and hypertension; linoleic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Linoleic acid ; HMDB00673 Linoleic acid, also known as LA or linoleate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as lineolic acids and derivatives. These are derivatives of lineolic acid. Lineolic acid is a polyunsaturated omega-6 18 carbon long fatty acid, with two CC double bonds at the 9- and 12-positions. Linoleic acid exists as a liquid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Linoleic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, and feces. Within the cell, linoleic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and myelin sheath. Linoleic acid can be converted into Gamma-linolenic acid through the action of the enzyme fatty acid desaturase 2. In humans, linoleic acid is involved in the Alpha linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid metabolism pathway. Outside of the human body, linoleic acid can be found in a number of food items such as jujube, star fruit, winter savory, and black mulberry. This makes linoleic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Linoleic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Linoleic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as schizophrenia, thyroid cancer, cirrhosis, and hypertension; linoleic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including isovaleric acidemia.
Linoleoyl ethanolamide ; HMDB0012252 Anandamide (18:2, N-6), also known as linoleamide mea or linoleoylethanolamide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acylethanolamines. N-acylethanolamines are compounds containing an N-acyethanolamine moiety, which is characterized by an acyl group is linked to the nitrogen atom of ethanolamine. Thus, anandamide (18:2, N-6) is considered to be a fatty amide lipid molecule. Anandamide (18:2, N-6) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Anandamide (18:2, N-6) has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, anandamide (18:2, N-6) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Anandamide (18:2, N-6) can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid.
Linoleoyl ethanolamide ; HMDB12252 Anandamide (18:2, N-6), also known as linoleamide mea or linoleoylethanolamide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acylethanolamines. N-acylethanolamines are compounds containing an N-acyethanolamine moiety, which is characterized by an acyl group is linked to the nitrogen atom of ethanolamine. Thus, anandamide (18:2, N-6) is considered to be a fatty amide lipid molecule. Anandamide (18:2, N-6) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Anandamide (18:2, N-6) has been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, anandamide (18:2, N-6) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). Anandamide (18:2, N-6) can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid.
Linoleyl carnitine ; HMDB0006469 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine, also known as octadecadienyl-L-carnitine or alpha-linoleoylcarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, 9,12-hexadecadienylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 9,12-hexadecadienylcarnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and mitochondria. 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid. 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including glutaric aciduria II.
Linoleyl carnitine ; HMDB06469 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine, also known as octadecadienyl-L-carnitine or alpha-linoleoylcarnitine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, 9,12-hexadecadienylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, 9,12-hexadecadienylcarnitine is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and mitochondria. 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid. 9,12-Hexadecadienylcarnitine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including glutaric aciduria II.
Lithocholic acid ; HMDB0000761 Lithocholic acid, also known as lithocholate or 5b-cholanate-3a-ol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as monohydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are bile acids, alcohols or any of their derivatives bearing a hydroxyl group. Lithocholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Lithocholic acid has been found in human hepatic tissue, intestine and liver tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, lithocholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, lithocholic acid is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, and the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway. Lithocholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, the zellweger syndrome pathway, and 27-hydroxylase deficiency.
Lithocholic acid ; HMDB00761 Lithocholic acid, also known as lithocholate or 5b-cholanate-3a-ol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as monohydroxy bile acids, alcohols and derivatives. These are bile acids, alcohols or any of their derivatives bearing a hydroxyl group. Lithocholic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Lithocholic acid has been found in human hepatic tissue, intestine and liver tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, lithocholic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, lithocholic acid is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, and the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway. Lithocholic acid is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, the zellweger syndrome pathway, and 27-hydroxylase deficiency.
Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate ; HMDB0000698 Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate, also known as glycolithocholic acid or lithocholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, lithocholic acid glycine conjugate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, lithocholic acid glycine conjugate is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, the zellweger syndrome pathway, and 27-hydroxylase deficiency.
Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate ; HMDB00698 Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate, also known as glycolithocholic acid or lithocholylglycine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycinated bile acids and derivatives. Glycinated bile acids and derivatives are compounds with a structure characterized by the presence of a glycine linked to a bile acid skeleton. Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, lithocholic acid glycine conjugate is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, lithocholic acid glycine conjugate is involved in bile acid biosynthesis pathway, the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway. Lithocholic acid glycine conjugate is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, the zellweger syndrome pathway, and 27-hydroxylase deficiency.
Lithocholyltaurine ; HMDB0000722 Lithocholyltaurine, also known as taurolithocholate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as taurinated bile acids and derivatives. These are bile acid derivatives containing a taurine conjugated to the bile acid moiety. Thus, lithocholyltaurine is considered to be a steroid conjugate lipid molecule. Lithocholyltaurine exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Lithocholyltaurine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, lithocholyltaurine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, lithocholyltaurine is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway. Lithocholyltaurine is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the zellweger syndrome pathway.
Lithocholyltaurine ; HMDB00722 Lithocholyltaurine, also known as taurolithocholate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as taurinated bile acids and derivatives. These are bile acid derivatives containing a taurine conjugated to the bile acid moiety. Thus, lithocholyltaurine is considered to be a steroid conjugate lipid molecule. Lithocholyltaurine exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Lithocholyltaurine has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in bile, feces, blood, and urine. Within the cell, lithocholyltaurine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. In humans, lithocholyltaurine is involved in the cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) pathway, congenital bile acid synthesis defect type III pathway, bile acid biosynthesis pathway, and congenital bile acid synthesis defect type II pathway. Lithocholyltaurine is also involved in a few metabolic disorders, which include the familial hypercholanemia (fhca) pathway, 27-hydroxylase deficiency, and the zellweger syndrome pathway.
LysoPC(14:0/0:0) ; HMDB0010379 PC(14:0/0:0), also known as LPC(14:0) or lysopc(14:0/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(14:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(14:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(14:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and blood. Within the cell, PC(14:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(14:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, PC(14:0/0:0) is involved in the fenoprofen action pathway, the etoricoxib action pathway, the salicylate-sodium action pathway, and the celecoxib action pathway. PC(14:0/0:0) is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway and leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency.
LysoPC(14:0/0:0) ; HMDB10379 PC(14:0/0:0), also known as LPC(14:0) or lysopc(14:0/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(14:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(14:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(14:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and blood. Within the cell, PC(14:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(14:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, PC(14:0/0:0) is involved in the fenoprofen action pathway, the etoricoxib action pathway, the salicylate-sodium action pathway, and the celecoxib action pathway. PC(14:0/0:0) is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the tiaprofenic Acid action pathway and leukotriene C4 synthesis deficiency.
LysoPC(16:0) ; HMDB0010382 PC(16:0/0:0), also known as 16:0 lyso-PC or 1-palmitoyl-GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(16:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(16:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(16:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, PC(16:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(16:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, PC(16:0/0:0) is involved in phospholipid biosynthesis pathway.
LysoPC(16:0) ; HMDB10382 PC(16:0/0:0), also known as 16:0 lyso-PC or 1-palmitoyl-GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(16:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(16:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(16:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, PC(16:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(16:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, PC(16:0/0:0) is involved in phospholipid biosynthesis pathway.
LysoPC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0010383 PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as LPC 16:1(9Z)/0:0 or 1-palmitoleoyl-GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB10383 PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as LPC 16:1(9Z)/0:0 or 1-palmitoleoyl-GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(16:1(9Z)/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPC(18:0) ; HMDB0010384 PC(18:0/0:0), also known as LPC 18:0/0:0 or 18:0 lyso-PC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(18:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(18:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and feces. Within the cell, PC(18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(18:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPC(18:0) ; HMDB10384 PC(18:0/0:0), also known as LPC 18:0/0:0 or 18:0 lyso-PC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(18:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(18:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and feces. Within the cell, PC(18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(18:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPC(18:1(9Z)) ; HMDB0002815 PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as lysopc 18:1(9Z)/0:0 or LPC(18:1W9/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be found in a number of food items such as cucumber, rice, common buckwheat, and common wheat. This makes PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
LysoPC(18:1(9Z)) ; HMDB02815 PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as lysopc 18:1(9Z)/0:0 or LPC(18:1W9/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) can be found in a number of food items such as cucumber, rice, common buckwheat, and common wheat. This makes PC(18:1(9Z)/0:0) a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
LysoPC(18:2(9Z,12Z)) ; HMDB0010386 PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0), also known as LPC 18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0 or LPC(18:2n6/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid. Outside of the human body, PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be found in a number of food items such as acerola, deerberry, cowpea, and lemon thyme. This makes PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
LysoPC(18:2(9Z,12Z)) ; HMDB10386 PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0), also known as LPC 18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0 or LPC(18:2n6/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid. Outside of the human body, PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be found in a number of food items such as acerola, deerberry, cowpea, and lemon thyme. This makes PC(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
LysoPC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) ; HMDB0010387 PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0), also known as LPC(18:3/0:0) or lysopc(18:3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) ; HMDB10387 PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0), also known as LPC(18:3/0:0) or lysopc(18:3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(20:1(11Z)) ; HMDB0010391 PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0), also known as LPC(20:1n9/0:0) or lysopc(20:1(11Z)), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(20:1(11Z)) ; HMDB10391 PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0), also known as LPC(20:1n9/0:0) or lysopc(20:1(11Z)), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) ; HMDB0010393 Lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)), also known as LPC 20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)/0:0 or LPC(20:3/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. Lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. Lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) can be biosynthesized from (5Z,8Z,11Z)-icosatrienoic acid.
LysoPC(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) ; HMDB10393 Lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)), also known as LPC 20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)/0:0 or LPC(20:3/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. Lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. Lysopc(20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)) can be biosynthesized from (5Z,8Z,11Z)-icosatrienoic acid.
LysoPC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) ; HMDB0010395 PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), also known as LPC 20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0 or 1-arachidonoyl-GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from arachidonic acid.
LysoPC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)) ; HMDB10395 PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), also known as LPC 20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0 or 1-arachidonoyl-GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from arachidonic acid.
LysoPC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) ; HMDB0010397 PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0), also known as lysophosphatidylcholine(20:5/0:0) or LPC(20:5/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)) ; HMDB10397 PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0), also known as lysophosphatidylcholine(20:5/0:0) or LPC(20:5/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) ; HMDB0010401 PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0), also known as LPC(22:4/0:0) or 1-adrenoyl-GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from all-cis-docosa-7,10,13,16-tetraenoic acid.
LysoPC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)) ; HMDB10401 PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0), also known as LPC(22:4/0:0) or 1-adrenoyl-GPC, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from all-cis-docosa-7,10,13,16-tetraenoic acid.
LysoPC(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) ; HMDB0010403 Lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)), also known as lysophosphatidylcholine(22:5/0:0) or LPC(22:5/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. Lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. Lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) can be biosynthesized from (7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)-docosapentaenoic acid.
LysoPC(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) ; HMDB10403 Lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)), also known as lysophosphatidylcholine(22:5/0:0) or LPC(22:5/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. Lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. Lysopc(22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) can be biosynthesized from (7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)-docosapentaenoic acid.
LysoPC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) ; HMDB0010404 PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0), also known as LPC 22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0 or lysophosphatidylcholine(22:6/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from all-cis-docosa-4,7,10,13,16,19-hexaenoic acid.
LysoPC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)) ; HMDB10404 PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0), also known as LPC 22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0 or lysophosphatidylcholine(22:6/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from all-cis-docosa-4,7,10,13,16,19-hexaenoic acid.
LysoPC(24:0) ; HMDB0010405 PC(24:0/0:0), also known as GPC(24:0) or lysopc(24:0/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(24:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(24:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(24:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(24:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(24:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from tetracosanoic acid.
LysoPC(24:0) ; HMDB10405 PC(24:0/0:0), also known as GPC(24:0) or lysopc(24:0/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphocholine. Thus, PC(24:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(24:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(24:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(24:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PC(24:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from tetracosanoic acid.
LysoPC(P-16:0) ; HMDB0010407 PC(p-16:0/0:0), also known as LPC p-16:0/0:0 or lysoplasmalogens, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-(1z-alkenyl)-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines that carry exactly one 1Z-alkenyl chain attached at the O1 position of a glycerol moiety through an ether linkage. Thus, PC(p-16:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(p-16:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(p-16:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(p-16:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(P-16:0) ; HMDB10407 PC(p-16:0/0:0), also known as LPC p-16:0/0:0 or lysoplasmalogens, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-(1z-alkenyl)-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines that carry exactly one 1Z-alkenyl chain attached at the O1 position of a glycerol moiety through an ether linkage. Thus, PC(p-16:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(p-16:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(p-16:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PC(p-16:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(P-18:0) ; HMDB0013122 PC(p-18:0/0:0), also known as LPC(18:0/0:0) or GPC(p-18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-(1z-alkenyl)-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines that carry exactly one 1Z-alkenyl chain attached at the O1 position of a glycerol moiety through an ether linkage. Thus, PC(p-18:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(p-18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(p-18:0/0:0) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, PC(p-18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPC(P-18:0) ; HMDB13122 PC(p-18:0/0:0), also known as LPC(18:0/0:0) or GPC(p-18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-(1z-alkenyl)-glycero-3-phosphocholines. These are glycerophosphocholines that carry exactly one 1Z-alkenyl chain attached at the O1 position of a glycerol moiety through an ether linkage. Thus, PC(p-18:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphocholine lipid molecule. PC(p-18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PC(p-18:0/0:0) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, PC(p-18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPE(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) ; HMDB0011478 Lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)), also known as lyso-pe(0:0/18:3) or lpe(18:3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-2 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. Lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPE(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) ; HMDB11478 Lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)), also known as lyso-pe(0:0/18:3) or lpe(18:3), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-2 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. Lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, lysope(0:0/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPE(16:0/0:0) ; HMDB0011503 PE(16:0/0:0), also known as 1-palmitoyl-gpe or gpe(16:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(16:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(16:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(16:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PE(16:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(16:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, PE(16:0/0:0) is involved in phospholipid biosynthesis pathway.
LysoPE(16:0/0:0) ; HMDB11503 PE(16:0/0:0), also known as 1-palmitoyl-gpe or gpe(16:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(16:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(16:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(16:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PE(16:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(16:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, PE(16:0/0:0) is involved in phospholipid biosynthesis pathway.
LysoPE(18:0/0:0) ; HMDB0011130 PE(18:0/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(18:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(18:0/0:0) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PE(18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(18:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPE(18:0/0:0) ; HMDB11130 PE(18:0/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(18:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(18:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(18:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(18:0/0:0) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PE(18:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(18:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0011506 PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as 1-18:1-lysope or lyso-pe(18:1), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) ; HMDB11506 PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0), also known as 1-18:1-lysope or lyso-pe(18:1), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(18:1(9Z)/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0011507 PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(18:2n6/0:0) or lpe(18:2), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid.
LysoPE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) ; HMDB11507 PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(18:2n6/0:0) or lpe(18:2), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from linoleic acid.
LysoPE(20:0/0:0) ; HMDB0011511 PE(20:0/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(20:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(20:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(20:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(20:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(20:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(20:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from arachidic acid.
LysoPE(20:0/0:0) ; HMDB11511 PE(20:0/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(20:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(20:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(20:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(20:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(20:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(20:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from arachidic acid.
LysoPE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0011512 PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(20:1) or lpe(20:1/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) ; HMDB11512 PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(20:1) or lpe(20:1/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(20:1(11Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0011517 PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), also known as lpe(20:4/0:0) or lysope(20:4), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) ; HMDB11517 PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), also known as lpe(20:4/0:0) or lysope(20:4), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
LysoPE(22:0/0:0) ; HMDB0011520 PE(22:0/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(22:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(22:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(22:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(22:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(22:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPE(22:0/0:0) ; HMDB11520 PE(22:0/0:0), also known as lyso-pe(22:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(22:0/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(22:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(22:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(22:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane.
LysoPE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) ; HMDB0011526 PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0), also known as lpe 22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0 or lysophosphatidylethanolamine(22:6/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from all-cis-docosa-4,7,10,13,16,19-hexaenoic acid.
LysoPE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) ; HMDB11526 PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0), also known as lpe 22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0 or lysophosphatidylethanolamine(22:6/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines. These are glycerophoethanolamines in which the glycerol is esterified with a fatty acid at O-1 position, and linked at position 3 to a phosphoethanolamine. Thus, PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is considered to be a glycerophosphoethanolamine lipid molecule. PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues, and has also been primarily detected in blood. Within the cell, PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and intracellular membrane. PE(22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) can be biosynthesized from all-cis-docosa-4,7,10,13,16,19-hexaenoic acid.
Malondialdehyde ; HMDB0006112 Malondialdehyde, also known as 1,3-propanedial or MDA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds. These are carbonyl compounds with the generic formula O=C(R)C(H)C(R')=O, where R and R' can be any group. Malondialdehyde exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Malondialdehyde has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Malondialdehyde is a potentially toxic compound.
Malondialdehyde ; HMDB06112 Malondialdehyde, also known as 1,3-propanedial or MDA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds. These are carbonyl compounds with the generic formula O=C(R)C(H)C(R')=O, where R and R' can be any group. Malondialdehyde exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Malondialdehyde has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Malondialdehyde is a potentially toxic compound.
Malonic acid ; HMDB0000691 Malonic acid, also known as malonate or H2MALO, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dicarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Malonic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Malonic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, malonic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Malonic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, malonic acid is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway and fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Malonic acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as combined malonic and methylmalonic aciduria; malonic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency.
Malonic acid ; HMDB00691 Malonic acid, also known as malonate or H2MALO, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dicarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Malonic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Malonic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, malonic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Malonic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, malonic acid is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway and fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Malonic acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as combined malonic and methylmalonic aciduria; malonic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency.
Malonylcarnitine ; HMDB0002095 Malonylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, malonylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Malonylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Malonylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, malonylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Malonylcarnitine can be biosynthesized from malonic acid.
Malonylcarnitine ; HMDB02095 Malonylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as acyl carnitines. These are organic compounds containing a fatty acid with the carboxylic acid attached to carnitine through an ester bond. Thus, malonylcarnitine is considered to be a fatty ester lipid molecule. Malonylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Malonylcarnitine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, malonylcarnitine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Malonylcarnitine can be biosynthesized from malonic acid.
Maltotriose ; HMDB0001262 Maltotriose belongs to the class of organic compounds known as oligosaccharides. These are carbohydrates made up of 3 to 10 monosaccharide units linked to each other through glycosidic bonds. Maltotriose is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Maltotriose has been found in human prostate, liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, maltotriose is primarily located in the cytoplasm and lysosome. In humans, maltotriose is involved in the galactose metabolism pathway.
Mandelic acid ; HMDB0000703 Mandelic acid, also known as L-mandelate or (S)-mandelsaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as benzene and substituted derivatives. These are aromatic compounds containing one monocyclic ring system consisting of benzene. Mandelic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Mandelic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Mandelic acid has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including phenylketonuria.
Mandelic acid ; HMDB00703 Mandelic acid, also known as L-mandelate or (S)-mandelsaeure, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as benzene and substituted derivatives. These are aromatic compounds containing one monocyclic ring system consisting of benzene. Mandelic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Mandelic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Mandelic acid has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including phenylketonuria.
Maslinic acid ; HMDB0002392 Maslinic acid, also known as crategolic acid or crategolate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as triterpenoids. These are terpene molecules containing six isoprene units. Maslinic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Within the cell, maslinic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Maslinic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, maslinic acid can be biosynthesized from oleanane. Maslinic acid can also be converted into 2-O-caffeoyl maslinic acid and 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-28-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]maslinic acid.
Maslinic acid ; HMDB02392 Maslinic acid, also known as crategolic acid or crategolate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as triterpenoids. These are terpene molecules containing six isoprene units. Maslinic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Within the cell, maslinic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP) and cytoplasm. Maslinic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, maslinic acid can be biosynthesized from oleanane. Maslinic acid can also be converted into 2-O-caffeoyl maslinic acid and 3-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-28-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1->2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]maslinic acid.
Mesaconic acid ; HMDB0000749 Citraconic acid, also known as methylmaleic acid or 2-methylmaleate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methyl-branched fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an acyl chain that has a methyl branch. Usually, they are saturated and contain only one or more methyl group. However, branches other than methyl may be present. Citraconic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Citraconic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, citraconic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Citraconic acid can be biosynthesized from maleic acid.
Mesaconic acid ; HMDB00749 Citraconic acid, also known as methylmaleic acid or 2-methylmaleate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methyl-branched fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an acyl chain that has a methyl branch. Usually, they are saturated and contain only one or more methyl group. However, branches other than methyl may be present. Citraconic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Citraconic acid has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, citraconic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Citraconic acid can be biosynthesized from maleic acid.
Methionine sulfoxide ; HMDB0002005 Methionine sulfoxide, also known as met-so or S-oxide-methionine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Methionine sulfoxide exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methionine sulfoxide has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, methionine sulfoxide is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Methionine sulfoxide participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Methionine sulfoxide can be biosynthesized from L-methionine through the action of the enzyme methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase B3. In addition, Methionine sulfoxide can be biosynthesized from L-methionine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase b2, mitochondrial. In humans, methionine sulfoxide is involved in the methionine metabolism pathway. Methionine sulfoxide is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hypermethioninemia pathway, glycine N-methyltransferase deficiency, methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (MTHFRD).
Methionine sulfoxide ; HMDB02005 Methionine sulfoxide, also known as met-so or S-oxide-methionine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as alpha amino acids. These are amino acids in which the amino group is attached to the carbon atom immediately adjacent to the carboxylate group (alpha carbon). Methionine sulfoxide exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methionine sulfoxide has been found in human epidermis tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, methionine sulfoxide is primarily located in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Methionine sulfoxide participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Methionine sulfoxide can be biosynthesized from L-methionine through the action of the enzyme methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase B3. In addition, Methionine sulfoxide can be biosynthesized from L-methionine; which is catalyzed by the enzyme methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase b2, mitochondrial. In humans, methionine sulfoxide is involved in the methionine metabolism pathway. Methionine sulfoxide is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the hypermethioninemia pathway, glycine N-methyltransferase deficiency, methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency (MTHFRD).
Methylcysteine ; HMDB0002108 Methylcysteine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-cysteine-s-conjugates. L-cysteine-S-conjugates are compounds containing L-cysteine where the thio-group is conjugated. Methylcysteine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methylcysteine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Outside of the human body, methylcysteine can be found in soft-necked garlic. This makes methylcysteine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Methylcysteine ; HMDB02108 Methylcysteine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as l-cysteine-s-conjugates. L-cysteine-S-conjugates are compounds containing L-cysteine where the thio-group is conjugated. Methylcysteine is soluble (in water) and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methylcysteine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Outside of the human body, methylcysteine can be found in soft-necked garlic. This makes methylcysteine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
Methylimidazoleacetic acid ; HMDB0002820 Methylimidazoleacetic acid, also known as 1-methylimidazole-4-acetate or miaa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an imidazole ring. Methylimidazoleacetic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methylimidazoleacetic acid has been found in human brain tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Methylimidazoleacetic acid can be biosynthesized from methylimidazole acetaldehyde through its interaction with the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase, dimeric nadp-preferring. In humans, methylimidazoleacetic acid is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. Methylimidazoleacetic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway.
Methylimidazoleacetic acid ; HMDB02820 Methylimidazoleacetic acid, also known as 1-methylimidazole-4-acetate or miaa, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as imidazolyl carboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing a carboxylic acid chain (of at least 2 carbon atoms) linked to an imidazole ring. Methylimidazoleacetic acid is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methylimidazoleacetic acid has been found in human brain tissue, and has also been primarily detected in saliva, urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Methylimidazoleacetic acid can be biosynthesized from methylimidazole acetaldehyde through its interaction with the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase, dimeric nadp-preferring. In humans, methylimidazoleacetic acid is involved in the histidine metabolism pathway. Methylimidazoleacetic acid is also involved in the metabolic disorder called the histidinemia pathway.
Methylmalonic acid ; HMDB0000202 Methylmalonic acid, also known as 2-methylmalonate or isosuccinic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dicarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Methylmalonic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methylmalonic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, methylmalonic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Methylmalonic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, methylmalonic acid is involved in the vitamin K metabolism pathway, the propanoate metabolism pathway, and the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway. Methylmalonic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III pathway, methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency. Methylmalonic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Methylmalonic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as methylmalonic aciduria mitochondrial encephelopathy leigh-like, cobalamin f disease (cblf), and alzheimer's disease; methylmalonic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including transcobalamin II deficiency and cobalamin malabsorption.
Methylmalonic acid ; HMDB00202 Methylmalonic acid, also known as 2-methylmalonate or isosuccinic acid, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as dicarboxylic acids and derivatives. These are organic compounds containing exactly two carboxylic acid groups. Methylmalonic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methylmalonic acid has been found in human liver and kidney tissues, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, methylmalonic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Methylmalonic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. In humans, methylmalonic acid is involved in the vitamin K metabolism pathway, the propanoate metabolism pathway, and the valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation pathway. Methylmalonic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency, the 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III pathway, methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency. Methylmalonic acid is a potentially toxic compound. Methylmalonic acid has been found to be associated with several diseases known as methylmalonic aciduria mitochondrial encephelopathy leigh-like, cobalamin f disease (cblf), and alzheimer's disease; methylmalonic acid has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including transcobalamin II deficiency and cobalamin malabsorption.
Methylmalonylcarnitine ; HMDB0013133 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
Methylmalonylcarnitine ; HMDB13133 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as beta hydroxy acids and derivatives. Beta hydroxy acids and derivatives are compounds containing a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxyl group on the C3 carbon atom. 3-Hydroxy-9Z-octadecenoylcarnitine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule.
Methylsuccinic acid ; HMDB0001844 Methylsuccinic acid, also known as methylsuccinate or 2-methylbutanedioate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methyl-branched fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an acyl chain that has a methyl branch. Usually, they are saturated and contain only one or more methyl group. However, branches other than methyl may be present. Methylsuccinic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Methylsuccinic acid has been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, methylsuccinic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm and adiposome. Methylsuccinic acid has been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, isovaleric acidemia, ethylmalonic encephalopathy, and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.
Metoprolol ; HMDB0001932 Metoprolol, also known as betaloc or (RS)-metoprolol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tyrosols and derivatives. Tyrosols and derivatives are compounds containing a hydroxyethyl group attached to the C4 carbon of a phenol group. Metoprolol is a drug which is used for the management of acute myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, heart failure and mild to moderate hypertension. may be used to treat supraventricular and tachyarrhythmias and as prophylaxis for migraine headaches. Metoprolol is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Metoprolol has been found in human liver tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, metoprolol is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). In humans, metoprolol is involved in the metoprolol action pathway.
Metoprolol ; HMDB01932 Metoprolol, also known as betaloc or (RS)-metoprolol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tyrosols and derivatives. Tyrosols and derivatives are compounds containing a hydroxyethyl group attached to the C4 carbon of a phenol group. Metoprolol is a drug which is used for the management of acute myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, heart failure and mild to moderate hypertension. may be used to treat supraventricular and tachyarrhythmias and as prophylaxis for migraine headaches. Metoprolol is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Metoprolol has been found in human liver tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, metoprolol is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). In humans, metoprolol is involved in the metoprolol action pathway.
MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) ; HMDB0011562 MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0), also known as a-monoacylglycerol or mag(14:1/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-monoacylglycerols. These are monoacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at the 1-position. MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues. Within the cell, MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Palmitic acid and MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from DG(10:0/16:0/0:0) through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol lipase. Furthermore, MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be converted into palmitic acid and glycerol through its interaction with the enzyme monoglyceride lipase. Furthermore, Palmitic acid and MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from DG(10:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol lipase. Furthermore, MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be converted into palmitic acid and glycerol through the action of the enzyme monoglyceride lipase. Furthermore, Palmitic acid and MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from DG(10:0/18:0/0:0); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol lipase. Finally, MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be converted into palmitic acid and glycerol; which is mediated by the enzyme monoglyceride lipase.
MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) ; HMDB11562 MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0), also known as a-monoacylglycerol or mag(14:1/0:0), belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-monoacylglycerols. These are monoacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at the 1-position. MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) has been found throughout all human tissues. Within the cell, MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Palmitic acid and MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from DG(10:0/16:0/0:0) through the action of the enzyme diacylglycerol lipase. Furthermore, MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be converted into palmitic acid and glycerol through its interaction with the enzyme monoglyceride lipase. Furthermore, Palmitic acid and MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from DG(10:0/16:1(9Z)/0:0) through its interaction with the enzyme diacylglycerol lipase. Furthermore, MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be converted into palmitic acid and glycerol through the action of the enzyme monoglyceride lipase. Furthermore, Palmitic acid and MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be biosynthesized from DG(10:0/18:0/0:0); which is catalyzed by the enzyme diacylglycerol lipase. Finally, MG(14:1(9Z)/0:0/0:0) can be converted into palmitic acid and glycerol; which is mediated by the enzyme monoglyceride lipase.
MG(18:0/0:0/0:0) ; HMDB0011131 MG(18:0/0:0/0:0), also known as (S)-1-monostearin or 1-stearoyl-glycerol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-monoacylglycerols. These are monoacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at the 1-position. MG(18:0/0:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. MG(18:0/0:0/0:0) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and sweat. Within the cell, MG(18:0/0:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
MG(18:0/0:0/0:0) ; HMDB11131 MG(18:0/0:0/0:0), also known as (S)-1-monostearin or 1-stearoyl-glycerol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as 1-monoacylglycerols. These are monoacylglycerols containing a glycerol acylated at the 1-position. MG(18:0/0:0/0:0) is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. MG(18:0/0:0/0:0) has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and sweat. Within the cell, MG(18:0/0:0/0:0) is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP).
myo-Inositol ; HMDB0000211 Myoinositol, also known as bios i or cyclohexitol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cyclohexanols. Cyclohexanols are compounds containing an alcohol group attached to a cyclohexane ring. Myoinositol is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Myoinositol has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, blood, saliva, and breast milk. Within the cell, myoinositol is primarily located in the myelin sheath. Myoinositol exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Myoinositol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, D-Galactose and myoinositol can be converted into galactinol through the action of the enzyme Alpha-galactosidase a. Furthermore, Myoinositol can be biosynthesized from D-myo-inositol 4-phosphate through the action of the enzyme inositol monophosphatase 1. Furthermore, Myoinositol can be biosynthesized from D-myo-inositol 4-phosphate through the action of the enzyme inositol monophosphatase 1. Finally, Myoinositol can be biosynthesized from myo-inositol 1-phosphate; which is catalyzed by the enzyme inositol monophosphatase 1. In humans, myoinositol is involved in the galactose metabolism pathway, the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway, the inositol metabolism pathway, and the phosphatidylinositol phosphate metabolism pathway. Myoinositol is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the galactosemia pathway and the joubert syndrome pathway.
myo-Inositol ; HMDB00211 Myoinositol, also known as bios i or cyclohexitol, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cyclohexanols. Cyclohexanols are compounds containing an alcohol group attached to a cyclohexane ring. Myoinositol is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Myoinositol has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including sweat, blood, saliva, and breast milk. Within the cell, myoinositol is primarily located in the myelin sheath. Myoinositol exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Myoinositol participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, D-Galactose and myoinositol can be converted into galactinol through the action of the enzyme Alpha-galactosidase a. Furthermore, Myoinositol can be biosynthesized from D-myo-inositol 4-phosphate through the action of the enzyme inositol monophosphatase 1. Furthermore, Myoinositol can be biosynthesized from D-myo-inositol 4-phosphate through the action of the enzyme inositol monophosphatase 1. Finally, Myoinositol can be biosynthesized from myo-inositol 1-phosphate; which is catalyzed by the enzyme inositol monophosphatase 1. In humans, myoinositol is involved in the galactose metabolism pathway, the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway, the inositol metabolism pathway, and the phosphatidylinositol phosphate metabolism pathway. Myoinositol is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the galactosemia pathway and the joubert syndrome pathway.
Myristic acid ; HMDB0000806 Myristic acid, also known as 14 or tetradecanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Myristic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Myristic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, myristic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Myristic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Myristic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Myristic acid can be biosynthesized from trans-tetra-dec-2-enoic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Furthermore, Myristic acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxohexadecanoic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. Furthermore, Myristic acid can be biosynthesized from trans-tetra-dec-2-enoic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Finally, Myristic acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxohexadecanoic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. In humans, myristic acid is involved in fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Outside of the human body, myristic acid can be found in a number of food items such as lotus, buffalo currant, dill, and salmonberry. This makes myristic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Myristic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Myristic acid ; HMDB00806 Myristic acid, also known as 14 or tetradecanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Myristic acid exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. Myristic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including feces, blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Within the cell, myristic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, membrane (predicted from logP) and adiposome. Myristic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Myristic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, Myristic acid can be biosynthesized from trans-tetra-dec-2-enoic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Furthermore, Myristic acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxohexadecanoic acid; which is catalyzed by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. Furthermore, Myristic acid can be biosynthesized from trans-tetra-dec-2-enoic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme fatty acid synthase. enoyl reductase domain. Finally, Myristic acid and malonic acid can be converted into 3-oxohexadecanoic acid through its interaction with the enzyme fatty acid synthase. Beta ketoacyl synthase domain. In humans, myristic acid is involved in fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Outside of the human body, myristic acid can be found in a number of food items such as lotus, buffalo currant, dill, and salmonberry. This makes myristic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products. Myristic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
Myristoleic acid ; HMDB0002000 Myristoleic acid, also known as 9-tetradecenoate or myristoleate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Myristoleic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Myristoleic acid has been found in human adipose tissue tissue, and has also been primarily detected in feces, saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, myristoleic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Myristoleic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Myristoleic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 1-[(9Z)-hexadecenoyl]-2-[(9Z)-tetradecenoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, O-[(9Z)-tetradecenoyl]-L-carnitine, and 1,2-dimyristoleoyl-sn-glycerol. Outside of the human body, myristoleic acid can be found in a number of food items such as lard, sorrel, walnut, and baby food. This makes myristoleic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
Myristoleic acid ; HMDB02000 Myristoleic acid, also known as 9-tetradecenoate or myristoleate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as long-chain fatty acids. These are fatty acids with an aliphatic tail that contains between 13 and 21 carbon atoms. Myristoleic acid is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Myristoleic acid has been found in human adipose tissue tissue, and has also been primarily detected in feces, saliva, blood, and urine. Within the cell, myristoleic acid is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP), cytoplasm and adiposome. Myristoleic acid exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Myristoleic acid is also a parent compound for other transformation products, including but not limited to, 1-[(9Z)-hexadecenoyl]-2-[(9Z)-tetradecenoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, O-[(9Z)-tetradecenoyl]-L-carnitine, and 1,2-dimyristoleoyl-sn-glycerol. Outside of the human body, myristoleic acid can be found in a number of food items such as lard, sorrel, walnut, and baby food. This makes myristoleic acid a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
N-(3-acetamidopropyl)pyrrolidin-2-one ; HMDB0061384 N-(3-Acetamidopropyl)pyrrolidin-2-one, also known as N-acetylisoputreanine-g-lactam or acisoga, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-alkylpyrrolidines. N-alkylpyrrolidines are compounds containing a pyrrolidine moiety that is substituted at the N1-position with an alkyl group. Pyrrolidine is a five-membered saturated aliphatic heterocycle with one nitrogen atom and four carbon atoms. N-(3-Acetamidopropyl)pyrrolidin-2-one is soluble (in water) and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). N-(3-Acetamidopropyl)pyrrolidin-2-one has been primarily detected in urine.
N-a-Acetyl-L-arginine ; HMDB0004620 N-a-Acetyl-L-arginine, also known as N-ac-L-arg-OH or N-alpha-acetylarginine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-a-Acetyl-L-arginine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. N-a-Acetyl-L-arginine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Outside of the human body, N-a-acetyl-L-arginine can be found in apple and loquat. This makes N-a-acetyl-L-arginine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
N-a-Acetyl-L-arginine ; HMDB04620 N-a-Acetyl-L-arginine, also known as N-ac-L-arg-OH or N-alpha-acetylarginine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-a-Acetyl-L-arginine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. N-a-Acetyl-L-arginine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Outside of the human body, N-a-acetyl-L-arginine can be found in apple and loquat. This makes N-a-acetyl-L-arginine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
N-Acetyl-b-D-galactosamine ; HMDB0000853 N-Acetyl-b-D-galactosamine, also known as beta-galnac or -galnac, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha-hexosamines. These are carbohydrate derivatives containing a hexose moiety in which the oxygen atom is replaced by an n-acyl group. N-Acetyl-b-D-galactosamine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-b-D-galactosamine can be converted into 1beta-glutathionylseleno-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Outside of the human body, N-acetyl-b-D-galactosamine can be found in a number of food items such as opium poppy, spirulina, komatsuna, and orange bell pepper. This makes N-acetyl-b-D-galactosamine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
N-Acetyl-b-D-galactosamine ; HMDB00853 N-Acetyl-b-D-galactosamine, also known as beta-galnac or -galnac, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha-hexosamines. These are carbohydrate derivatives containing a hexose moiety in which the oxygen atom is replaced by an n-acyl group. N-Acetyl-b-D-galactosamine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-b-D-galactosamine can be converted into 1beta-glutathionylseleno-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Outside of the human body, N-acetyl-b-D-galactosamine can be found in a number of food items such as opium poppy, spirulina, komatsuna, and orange bell pepper. This makes N-acetyl-b-D-galactosamine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
N-Acetyl-beta-alanine ; HMDB0061880 N-Acetyl-beta-alanine, also known as 3-(acetylamino)propanoate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as carboxylic acids. Carboxylic acids are compounds containing a carboxylic acid group with the formula -C(=O)OH. N-Acetyl-beta-alanine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-beta-alanine has been primarily detected in saliva.
N-Acetyl-L-alanine ; HMDB0000766 N-Acetyl-L-alanine, also known as ac-ala-OH or 2-acetamidopropionate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetyl-L-alanine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-L-alanine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, N-acetyl-L-alanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N-Acetyl-L-alanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N-Acetyl-L-alanine ; HMDB00766 N-Acetyl-L-alanine, also known as ac-ala-OH or 2-acetamidopropionate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetyl-L-alanine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-L-alanine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine. Within the cell, N-acetyl-L-alanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N-Acetyl-L-alanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid ; HMDB0000812 N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid, also known as N-acetylaspartate or NAA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aspartic acid and derivatives. Aspartic acid and derivatives are compounds containing an aspartic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of aspartic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid has been found in human brain and prostate tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, feces, blood, and saliva. Within the cell, N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and myelin sheath. N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid can be converted into acetic acid and L-aspartic acid through its interaction with the enzyme aspartoacylase. In humans, N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway. N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the canavan disease pathway and the hypoacetylaspartia pathway. N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid ; HMDB00812 N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid, also known as N-acetylaspartate or NAA, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aspartic acid and derivatives. Aspartic acid and derivatives are compounds containing an aspartic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of aspartic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid has been found in human brain and prostate tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including urine, feces, blood, and saliva. Within the cell, N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and myelin sheath. N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid can be converted into acetic acid and L-aspartic acid through its interaction with the enzyme aspartoacylase. In humans, N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid is involved in the aspartate metabolism pathway. N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid is also involved in a couple of metabolic disorders, which include the canavan disease pathway and the hypoacetylaspartia pathway. N-Acetyl-L-aspartic acid is a potentially toxic compound.
N-Acetyl-L-methionine ; HMDB0011745 N-Acetyl-L-methionine, also known as N-ac-L-methionine or hepsan, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methionine and derivatives. Methionine and derivatives are compounds containing methionine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of methionine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetyl-L-methionine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-L-methionine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and saliva.
N-Acetyl-L-methionine ; HMDB11745 N-Acetyl-L-methionine, also known as N-ac-L-methionine or hepsan, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methionine and derivatives. Methionine and derivatives are compounds containing methionine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of methionine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetyl-L-methionine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-L-methionine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and saliva.
N-Acetyl-L-phenylalanine ; HMDB0000512 N-Acetyl-D-phenylalanine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenylalanine and derivatives. Phenylalanine and derivatives are compounds containing phenylalanine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of phenylalanine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetyl-D-phenylalanine exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. N-Acetyl-D-phenylalanine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and saliva. Within the cell, N-acetyl-D-phenylalanine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N-Acetyl-D-phenylalanine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N-Acetyl-L-tyrosine ; HMDB0000866 N-Acetyl-L-tyrosine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as tyrosine and derivatives. Tyrosine and derivatives are compounds containing tyrosine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of tyrosine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetyl-L-tyrosine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-L-tyrosine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, N-acetyl-L-tyrosine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N-Acetyl-L-tyrosine has been found to be associated with the diseases known as preterm birth; n-acetyl-l-tyrosine has also been linked to several inborn metabolic disorders including aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency and tyrosinemia I.
N-Acetylasparagine ; HMDB0006028 N-Acetylasparagine, also known as acasn, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as asparagine and derivatives. Asparagine and derivatives are compounds containing asparagine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of asparagine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetylasparagine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
N-Acetylglutamic acid ; HMDB0001138 N-Acetylglutamic acid, also known as N-acetylglutamate or ac-glu-OH, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetylglutamic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylglutamic acid has been found in human liver tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, feces, and urine. Within the cell, N-acetylglutamic acid is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm.
N-Acetylglutamic acid ; HMDB01138 N-Acetylglutamic acid, also known as N-acetylglutamate or ac-glu-OH, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamic acid and derivatives. Glutamic acid and derivatives are compounds containing glutamic acid or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamic acid at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetylglutamic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylglutamic acid has been found in human liver tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, feces, and urine. Within the cell, N-acetylglutamic acid is primarily located in the mitochondria and cytoplasm.
N-Acetylglutamine ; HMDB0006029 N-Acetyl-glutamine, also known as aceglutamide or glcnac, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamine and derivatives. Glutamine and derivatives are compounds containing glutamine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetyl-glutamine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-glutamine has been primarily detected in urine. N-Acetyl-glutamine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N-Acetylglutamine ; HMDB06029 N-Acetyl-glutamine, also known as aceglutamide or glcnac, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glutamine and derivatives. Glutamine and derivatives are compounds containing glutamine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of glutamine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetyl-glutamine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyl-glutamine has been primarily detected in urine. N-Acetyl-glutamine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N-Acetylhistamine ; HMDB0013253 N-Acetylhistamine , also known as AHN, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acetyl-2-arylethylamines. N-acetyl-2-arylethylamines are compounds containing an acetamide group that is N-linked to an arylethylamine. N-Acetylhistamine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylhistamine can be biosynthesized from histamine.
N-Acetylhistamine ; HMDB13253 N-Acetylhistamine , also known as AHN, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acetyl-2-arylethylamines. N-acetyl-2-arylethylamines are compounds containing an acetamide group that is N-linked to an arylethylamine. N-Acetylhistamine is slightly soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylhistamine can be biosynthesized from histamine.
N-Acetylhistidine ; HMDB0032055 N-Acetylhistidine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as histidine and derivatives. Histidine and derivatives are compounds containing cysteine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of cysteine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetylhistidine exists as a solid, slightly soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Within the cell, N-acetylhistidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Outside of the human body, N-acetylhistidine can be found in fishes. This makes N-acetylhistidine a potential biomarker for the consumption of this food product.
N-Acetylisoleucine ; HMDB0061684 N-Acetylisoleucine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as isoleucine and derivatives. Isoleucine and derivatives are compounds containing isoleucine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of isoleucine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetylisoleucine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylisoleucine has been primarily detected in feces.
N-Acetylleucine ; HMDB0011756 N-Acetylleucine, also known as N-acetyl-leu or tanganil, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as leucine and derivatives. Leucine and derivatives are compounds containing leucine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of leucine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetylleucine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylleucine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and saliva.
N-Acetylneuraminic acid ; HMDB0000230 N-Acetylneuraminic acid, also known as N-acetylneuraminate or beta-neu5ac, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acylneuraminic acids. These are neuraminic acids carrying an N-acyl substituent. N-Acetylneuraminic acid exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a moderately acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylneuraminic acid has been found throughout most human tissues, and has also been detected in most biofluids, including breast milk, feces, cerebrospinal fluid, and blood. Within the cell, N-acetylneuraminic acid is primarily located in the cytoplasm, nucleus, lysosome and myelin sheath. N-Acetylneuraminic acid participates in a number of enzymatic reactions. In particular, N-Acetylneuraminic acid can be biosynthesized from N-acetylmannosamine and phosphoenolpyruvic acid through its interaction with the enzyme sialic acid synthase. In addition, N-Acetylneuraminic acid can be converted into N-acetylmannosamine and pyruvic acid; which is mediated by the enzyme N-acetylneuraminate lyase. In humans, N-acetylneuraminic acid is involved in the amino sugar metabolism pathway. N-Acetylneuraminic acid is also involved in several metabolic disorders, some of which include the tay-sachs disease pathway, the salla disease/infantile sialic Acid storage disease pathway, the g(m2)-gangliosidosis: variant b, tay-sachs disease pathway, and the sialuria or french type sialuria pathway. N-Acetylneuraminic acid has been found to be associated with the diseases known as sialidosis, normosomatic type; n-acetylneuraminic acid has also been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including salla disease.
N-Acetylornithine ; HMDB0003357 N-Acetylornithine, also known as AOR, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetylornithine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylornithine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, urine, and blood. N-Acetylornithine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, N-acetylornithine can be found in a number of food items such as sago palm, prickly pear, deerberry, and poppy. This makes N-acetylornithine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
N-Acetylornithine ; HMDB03357 N-Acetylornithine, also known as AOR, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetylornithine is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylornithine has been found in human prostate tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva, urine, and blood. N-Acetylornithine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans. Outside of the human body, N-acetylornithine can be found in a number of food items such as sago palm, prickly pear, deerberry, and poppy. This makes N-acetylornithine a potential biomarker for the consumption of these food products.
N-Acetylproline ; HMDB0094701 N-Acetylproline belongs to the class of organic compounds known as proline and derivatives. Proline and derivatives are compounds containing proline or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of proline at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Acetylproline is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylproline has been primarily detected in feces.
N-Acetylputrescine ; HMDB0002064 N-Acetylputrescine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as carboximidic acids. These are organic acids with the general formula RC(=N)-OH (R=H, organic group). N-Acetylputrescine is soluble (in water) and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylputrescine has been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, N-acetylputrescine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N-Acetylputrescine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N-Acetylputrescine ; HMDB02064 N-Acetylputrescine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as carboximidic acids. These are organic acids with the general formula RC(=N)-OH (R=H, organic group). N-Acetylputrescine is soluble (in water) and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylputrescine has been primarily detected in saliva, feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, N-acetylputrescine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N-Acetylputrescine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N-Acetylserine ; HMDB0002931 N-Acetylserine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetylserine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylserine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and urine. Within the cell, N-acetylserine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N-Acetylserine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including aminoacylase I deficiency.
N-Acetylserine ; HMDB02931 N-Acetylserine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetylserine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylserine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as saliva and urine. Within the cell, N-acetylserine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N-Acetylserine has been linked to the inborn metabolic disorders including aminoacylase I deficiency.
N-Acetyltaurine ; HMDB0240253 N-Acetyltaurine, also known as atamg or nact, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as organosulfonic acids. Organosulfonic acids are compounds containing the sulfonic acid group, which has the general structure RS(=O)2OH (R is not a hydrogen atom). N-Acetyltaurine is soluble (in water) and an extremely strong acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetyltaurine can be biosynthesized from taurine.
N-Acetylthreonine ; HMDB0062557 N-Acetylthreonine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetylthreonine has been primarily detected in feces.
N-acetyltryptophan ; HMDB0013713 N-Acetyltryptophan, also known as ac-try or acetyl-L-TRP, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetyltryptophan exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. N-Acetyltryptophan has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine.
N-acetyltryptophan ; HMDB13713 N-Acetyltryptophan, also known as ac-try or acetyl-L-TRP, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-l-alpha-amino acids. These are n-acylated alpha amino acids which have the L-configuration of the alpha-carbon atom. N-Acetyltryptophan exists as a solid and is considered to be practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral. N-Acetyltryptophan has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine.
N-Acetylvaline ; HMDB0011757 N-Acetylvaline, also known as acetyl-val, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. N-Acetylvaline is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Acetylvaline has been primarily detected in feces.
N-Alpha-acetyllysine ; HMDB0000446 Acetyllysine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. Acetyllysine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). Acetyllysine has been primarily detected in feces. Within the cell, acetyllysine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. Acetyllysine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N-Carboxyethyl-g-aminobutyric acid ; HMDB0002201 N-Carboxyethyl-g-aminobutyric acid, also known as 4-(2-carboxy-ethylamino)-butyrate or carboxyethyl-gaba, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as gamma amino acids and derivatives. These are amino acids having a (-NH2) group attached to the gamma carbon atom. N-Carboxyethyl-g-aminobutyric acid is soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
N-Formyl-L-methionine ; HMDB0001015 N-Formyl-L-methionine, also known as fmet or for-met-OH, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methionine and derivatives. Methionine and derivatives are compounds containing methionine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of methionine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Formyl-L-methionine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Formyl-L-methionine has been found in human intestine tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine.
N-Formyl-L-methionine ; HMDB01015 N-Formyl-L-methionine, also known as fmet or for-met-OH, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methionine and derivatives. Methionine and derivatives are compounds containing methionine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of methionine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom. N-Formyl-L-methionine is slightly soluble (in water) and a weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N-Formyl-L-methionine has been found in human intestine tissue, and has also been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and urine.
N-Lauroylglycine ; HMDB0013272 N-Lauroylglycine, also known as acylglycine c:12 or dodecanamidoacetate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. N-Lauroylglycine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Within the cell, N-lauroylglycine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). N-Lauroylglycine can be biosynthesized from dodecanoic acid.
N-Lauroylglycine ; HMDB13272 N-Lauroylglycine, also known as acylglycine c:12 or dodecanamidoacetate, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. N-Lauroylglycine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. Within the cell, N-lauroylglycine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). N-Lauroylglycine can be biosynthesized from dodecanoic acid.
N-Methyl-L-proline ; HMDB0094696 N-Methyl-L-proline, also known as N-methyl-L-proline, (2S)-1-methylpyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid, hydric acid, or monomethyl proline, is classified as a proline or a proline derivative. It is not naturally produced by humans and can only be obtained from the diet. In particular, it is a metabolically inert cell protectant found in many plants and is used by plants to protect against extremes in osmolarity and growth temperatures. N-Methyl-L-proline is found in the fruit juices of yellow orange, blood orange, lemon, mandarin, and bitter orange (PMID: 21838291).
N-Methylhistamine ; HMDB0061685 N-Methylhistamine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aralkylamines. These are alkylamines in which the alkyl group is substituted at one carbon atom by an aromatic hydrocarbyl group. N-Methylhistamine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
N-Methylhistamine ; HMDB61685 N-Methylhistamine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as aralkylamines. These are alkylamines in which the alkyl group is substituted at one carbon atom by an aromatic hydrocarbyl group. N-Methylhistamine is soluble (in water) and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa).
N-Oleoylethanolamine ; HMDB0002088 N-Oleoyl ethanolamine, also known as OEA or N-(hydroxyethyl)oleamide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acylethanolamines. N-acylethanolamines are compounds containing an N-acyethanolamine moiety, which is characterized by an acyl group is linked to the nitrogen atom of ethanolamine. Thus, N-oleoyl ethanolamine is considered to be a fatty amide lipid molecule. N-Oleoyl ethanolamine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. N-Oleoyl ethanolamine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, N-oleoyl ethanolamine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). N-Oleoyl ethanolamine can be biosynthesized from oleic acid.
N-Oleoylethanolamine ; HMDB02088 N-Oleoyl ethanolamine, also known as OEA or N-(hydroxyethyl)oleamide, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as n-acylethanolamines. N-acylethanolamines are compounds containing an N-acyethanolamine moiety, which is characterized by an acyl group is linked to the nitrogen atom of ethanolamine. Thus, N-oleoyl ethanolamine is considered to be a fatty amide lipid molecule. N-Oleoyl ethanolamine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. N-Oleoyl ethanolamine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces and blood. Within the cell, N-oleoyl ethanolamine is primarily located in the membrane (predicted from logP). N-Oleoyl ethanolamine can be biosynthesized from oleic acid.
N1,N12-Diacetylspermine ; HMDB0002172 N1,N12-Diacetylspermine, also known as daspm or n',n''-diacetylspermine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as carboximidic acids. These are organic acids with the general formula RC(=N)-OH (R=H, organic group). N1,N12-Diacetylspermine is considered to be a practically insoluble (in water) and relatively neutral molecule. N1,N12-Diacetylspermine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood.
N1-Acetylspermidine ; HMDB0001276 N1-Acetylspermidine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as carboximidic acids. These are organic acids with the general formula RC(=N)-OH (R=H, organic group). N1-Acetylspermidine is slightly soluble (in water) and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). N1-Acetylspermidine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, N1-acetylspermidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N1-Acetylspermidine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N1-Acetylspermidine ; HMDB01276 N1-Acetylspermidine belongs to the class of organic compounds known as carboximidic acids. These are organic acids with the general formula RC(=N)-OH (R=H, organic group). N1-Acetylspermidine is slightly soluble (in water) and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). N1-Acetylspermidine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, N1-acetylspermidine is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N1-Acetylspermidine exists in all eukaryotes, ranging from yeast to humans.
N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide ; HMDB0004193 N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, also known as 1-methyl-5-carboxylamide-2-pyridone, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as nicotinamides. These are heterocyclic aromatic compounds containing a pyridine ring substituted at position 3 by a carboxamide group. N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide is soluble (in water) and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide can be biosynthesized from 1-methylnicotinamide; which is mediated by the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In humans, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide is involved in the nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism pathway. N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide is a potentially toxic compound.
N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide ; HMDB04193 N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, also known as 1-methyl-5-carboxylamide-2-pyridone, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as nicotinamides. These are heterocyclic aromatic compounds containing a pyridine ring substituted at position 3 by a carboxamide group. N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide is soluble (in water) and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as feces, urine, and blood. Within the cell, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide can be biosynthesized from 1-methylnicotinamide; which is mediated by the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In humans, N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide is involved in the nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism pathway. N1-Methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide is a potentially toxic compound.
N1-Methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide ; HMDB0004194 N1-Methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide, also known as 5-aminocarbonyl-1-methyl-4(1h)-pyridone, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as nicotinamides. These are heterocyclic aromatic compounds containing a pyridine ring substituted at position 3 by a carboxamide group. N1-Methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide is soluble (in water) and an extremely weak acidic (essentially neutral) compound (based on its pKa). N1-Methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood. Within the cell, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide is primarily located in the cytoplasm. N1-Methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide can be biosynthesized from 1-methylnicotinamide through the action of the enzyme aldehyde oxidase. In humans, N1-methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide is involved in the nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism pathway. N1-Methyl-4-pyridone-3-carboxamide is a potentially toxic compound.
N2,N2-Dimethylguanosine ; HMDB0004824 N2,N2-Dimethylguanosine, also known as M22G or m(2)(2)g, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. N2,N2-Dimethylguanosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N2,N2-Dimethylguanosine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood.
N2,N2-Dimethylguanosine ; HMDB04824 N2,N2-Dimethylguanosine, also known as M22G or m(2)(2)g, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as purine nucleosides. Purine nucleosides are compounds comprising a purine base attached to a ribosyl or deoxyribosyl moiety. N2,N2-Dimethylguanosine exists as a solid, soluble (in water), and a very weakly acidic compound (based on its pKa). N2,N2-Dimethylguanosine has been detected in multiple biofluids, such as urine and blood.