DR10 DataRelease

SDY286: Modeling Pulmonary Immunity: Evaluation of the Innate Immune Response to Pathogens 1) Francisella tularensis 2) Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 3) Influenza A virus in cynomolgus macaque
Status: New
Description: A greater understanding of how alveolar macrophages respond to pathogens is important for the design of novel therapeutic agents for treatment of potentially lethal pulmonary infections. To increase understanding of early pulmonary infection response of macaques following infection with viral and bacterial pathogen, alveolar macrophages were used to determine the similarities and differences between species to invading pulmonary pathogens
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Modeling Immunity for Biodefense University of Pittsburgh Center for Modeling Immunity for Biodefense
DOI: 10.21430/M3EAOXZB4O
Subjects: 24
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Penelope Morel University of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh
Publications:
Large scale comparison of innate responses to viral and bacterial pathogens in mouse and macaque.. PLoS One. - 2011. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0022401. Epub 2011 Jul 18. [Pubmed: 21789257]
Resources:
University of Pittsburgh CMPI Data Exchange Server http://red.cs.pitt.edu/dataxs/]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
DNA microarray 258
Flow Cytometry 796
Luminex xMAP 46
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY288: Modeling Pulmonary Immunity: Evaluation of the Innate Immune Response to Pathogens 1) Francisella tularensis 2) Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 3) Influenza A virus in mice (C57BL/6 and BALB/c)
Status: New
Description: A greater understanding of how alveolar macrophages respond to pathogens is important for the design of novel therapeutic agents for treatment of potentially lethal pulmonary infections. To increase understanding of early pulmonary infection response of mice following infection with viral and bacterial pathogen, alveolar macrophages were used to determine the similarities and differences between species to invading pulmonary pathogens
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Modeling Immunity for Biodefense University of Pittsburgh Center for Modeling Immunity for Biodefense
DOI: 10.21430/M3H9VMI0DF
Subjects: 876
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Penelope Morel University of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh
Publications:
Large scale comparison of innate responses to viral and bacterial pathogens in mouse and macaque.. PLoS One. - 2011. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0022401. Epub 2011 Jul 18. [Pubmed: 21789257]
Resources:
University of Pittsburgh CMPI Data Exchange Server http://red.cs.pitt.edu/dataxs/]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Cell Culture 52
DNA microarray 381
ELISPOT 12
Flow Cytometry 1427
Luminex xMAP 148
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY61: Systems Biology of 2007 Influenza Vaccination in Humans (See companion studies SDY269 2008 / SDY270 2009 / SDY271 Role for CaMKIV in the Regulation of Antibody Responses to Influenza Vaccine)
Status: Updated
Description: Using a systems biology approach to study innate and adaptive responses to influenza vaccination in humans during the 2007-2008 influenza season.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Human Immunology Project Consortium 1 (HIPC1) Systems Biological Analysis of Innate and Adaptive Responses to Vaccination
NIAID Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS) Influenza Pathogenesis & Immunology Research Center (IPIRC)
DOI: 10.21430/M3FH0SA2W0
Subjects: 12
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Bali Pulendran Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University Emory Vaccine Center
Publications:
Systems biology of vaccination for seasonal influenza in humans.. Nat Immunol. Jul 2011. doi: 10.1038/ni.2067. [Pubmed: 21743478]
Systems Analysis of Immunity to Influenza Vaccination across Multiple Years and in Diverse Populations Reveals Shared Molecular Signatures.. Immunity. Dec 2015. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2015.11.012. [Pubmed: 26682988]
Resources:
Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE29614]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 4
Hemagglutination Inhibition 54
Q-PCR 27
Transcription profiling by array 27
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY162: Immunologic and genomic signatures of response to Hepatitis C Virus infection.
Status: Updated
Description: Examine the immune response in primary immune cells from subjects who have spontaneously cleared HCV compared to HCV chronically infected subjects
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Human Immunology Project Consortium 1 (HIPC1) Defining signatures for immune responsiveness by functional systems immunology HIPC1
DOI: 10.21430/M3TI5NZ7VL
Subjects: 20
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
David Hafler Yale Yale
Publications:
Impaired toll-like receptor 3-mediated immune responses from macrophages of patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus.. Clin Vaccine Immunol. Feb 2013. doi: 10.1128/CVI.00530-12. Epub 2012 Dec 5. [Pubmed: 23220997]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
DNA microarray 80
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY180: Systems scale interactive exploration reveals quantitative and qualitative differences in response to 2009-2010 Fluzone influenza vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine
Status: Updated
Description: Systems immunology approaches were employed to investigate innate and adaptive immune responses to influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. These two non-live vaccines show different magnitudes of transcriptional responses at different time points af- ter vaccination. Software solutions were developed to explore correlates of vaccine efficacy measured as antibody titers at day 28. These enabled a further dissection of transcriptional responses. Thus, the innate response, measured within hours in the peripheral blood, was dominated by an interferon transcriptional signature after influenza vaccination and by an inflammation signature after pneumo- coccal vaccination. Day 7 plasmablast responses induced by both vaccines was more pronounced after pneumococcal vaccination. Together, these results suggest that comparing global immune responses elicited by different vaccines will be critical to our understanding of the immune mechanisms underpinning successful vaccination.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Human Immunology Project Consortium 1 (HIPC1) Systems Analysis Vaccine Responses in Healthy and Hyporesponsive Humans
DOI: 10.21430/M3I44H8R17
Subjects: 46
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
A. Karolina Palucka Baylor Reasearch Institute Baylor Reasearch Institute
Publications:
Systems scale interactive exploration reveals quantitative and qualitative differences in response to influenza and pneumococcal vaccines.. Immunity. Apr 2013. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2012.12.008. [Pubmed: 23601689]
Resources:
Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE30101]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
DNA microarray 542
Flow Cytometry 2208
Hemagglutination Inhibition 66
Luminex xMAP 229
Nanostring 18
Transcription profiling by array 161
Virus Neutralization 89
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY201: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 6 2010-2011
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M35J0WA7CR
Subjects: 34
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 68
ELISPOT 136
Flow Cytometry 860
Hemagglutination Inhibition 102
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY210: Asthma Control Evaluation (ACE): A Biomarker-Based Approach to Improving Asthma Control and Mechanistic Studies
Status: Updated
Description: Over the past two decades, the prevalence of asthma has dramatically increased in many parts of the world. The current National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) identifies inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) as the preferred long-term control therapy for all forms of persistent asthma. However, there is still a significant proportion of patients with persistent asthma who are not receiving ICS therapy or do not follow their treatment plan. Individualized asthma treatment plans are needed. The use of biomarkers, in addition to NAEPP guidelines, may help enhance the level of asthma assessment, guide medication regimens, and improve overall asthma control. This study will determine whether NAEPP-recommended treatment, combined with eNO measurement, is more effective in reducing asthma symptoms than NAEPP-recommended treatment alone. ICAC-01 will last 46 weeks and will comprise 8 study visits. ICAC-01 also includes a mechanistic sub-study (ICAC-02). Its primary objective is to determine whether highly sensitized, compared to weakly sensitized asthmatic subjects have more severe asthma, as defined by the levels at randomization to the completion of ICAC-01. To address the primary objective of ICAC-02, the study will include all the participants enrolled in ICAC-01 with dust mite-, cockroach- and/or alternaria-specific IgE levels within certain parameters.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Inner City Asthma Consortium (ICAC) Inner City Asthma Consortium (ICAC)
DOI: 10.21430/M3I0JL7KUZ
Subjects: 546
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
William Busse University of Wisconsin, Madison University of Wisconsin, Madison
Publications:
Management of asthma based on exhaled nitric oxide in addition to guideline-based treatment for inner-city adolescents and young adults: a randomised controlled trial.. Lancet. Sep 2008. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(08)61448-8. [Pubmed: 18805335]
Asthma severity, not asthma control, is worse in atopic compared with nonatopic adolescents with asthma.. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. Jan 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.anai.2015.10.015. Epub 2015 Nov 7. [Pubmed: 26560898]
Resources:
Clinicaltrials.gov http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00114413]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY212: Apoptosis and other immune biomarkers predict influenza vaccine (TIV 2008) responsiveness
Status: Updated
Description: Despite the importance of the immune system in many diseases, there are currently no objective benchmarks of immunological health. In an effort to indentify benchmarks of immunological health, influenza vaccination was used in 30 young (20-30 years) and 59 older subjects (60 to 89 years) as models for strong and weak immune responses, respectively. Serological responses to influenza strains as well as a wide variety of other parameters, including gene expression, antibodies to hemagglutinin peptides, serum cytokines, cell subset phenotypes and in vitro cytokine stimulation were measured. Using machine learning, nine variables predicting antibody response with 84% accuracy were identified. Two of these variables are involved in apoptosis, which positively associated with the response to vaccination and was confirmed to be a contributor to vaccine responsiveness in mice. The identification of these biomarkers provides new insights into what immune features may be most important for immune health.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Human Immunology Project Consortium 1 (HIPC1) Vaccination and infection: indicators of immunological health and responsiveness
DOI: 10.21430/M37NGTHMDS
Subjects: 91
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Mark M. Davis Stanford University Stanford-LPCH Vaccine Program
Publications:
Apoptosis and other immune biomarkers predict influenza vaccine responsiveness.. Mol Syst Biol. Apr 2013. doi: 10.1038/msb.2013.15. [Pubmed: 23591775]
Effects of aging, cytomegalovirus infection, and EBV infection on human B cell repertoires.. J Immunol. Jan 2014. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1301384. Epub 2013 Dec 11. [Pubmed: 24337376]
Defective Signaling in the JAK-STAT Pathway Tracks with Chronic Inflammation and Cardiovascular Risk in Aging Humans.. Cell Syst. Oct 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.cels.2016.09.009. Epub 2016 Oct 13. [Pubmed: 27746093]
Resources:
Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE41080]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 1086
Hemagglutination Inhibition 534
Luminex xMAP 91
Protein microarray 91
Transcription profiling by array 91
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY218: Oral Immunotherapy for Childhood Egg Allergy
Status: Updated
Description:

In the United States, as many as 6% to 8% of children are affected by food allergy. In young children, allergic reactions to egg can range from mild rash to systemic anaphylaxis. The usual standard of care for allergy is complete avoidance of this food allergen and treatment of accidental systemic reactions by access to self-injected epinephrine. However, accidental exposure to allergens in processed foods may be difficult to avoid. Currently, several therapeutic strategies are being investigated to prevent and treat food allergies. Since standard injection (under the skin) immunotherapy for food allergy is associated with a high rate of allergic reactions, a few studies have recently tried oral immunotherapy (OIT) in food allergy. The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of the administration of OIT. The intent is to develop desensitization and eventually tolerance to egg allergen. This study will evaluate tolerance to egg white solid that may be gained by gradually increasing the amounts of egg white solid given to a child over a long period of time. This study will last up to 48 months. The participants will be randomly assigned to receive oral immunotherapy treatment with egg white solid or placebo. This study will include dose escalation and maintenance followed by oral food challenge (OFC).

For participants receiving egg OIT, visit 1 consists of multiple small incremental doses of egg white solid. This is followed by 32-40 weeks of gradual dose escalation to a stable maintenance dose of egg white solid for at least 8 weeks. At approximately Week 44, participants are given an OFC using 5 grams of egg white solid to identify desensitized individuals. Participants and study staff are unblinded following this initial OFC. Maintenance egg OIT therapy is continued for an additional 1-3 years. Oral Food Challenges with 10 grams of egg white solid will be performed for participants on maintenance egg OIT at subsequent time points (approximately Week 96 and annually thereafter) to test for desensitization. If passed, a repeat OFC after being off therapy for 4-6 weeks will be performed to test for tolerance. An OFC to test for tolerance will use 10 grams of egg white solid and be followed by an open feeding of egg.

Participants receiving placebo during dose escalation and maintenance are given an OFC using 5 grams of egg white solid to test for desensitization at approximately 44 weeks. They are unblinded at that time, continue on an egg-restricted diet, and are followed until up to 2 years. These participants will only receive an OFC at a subsequent time point if their egg Immunoglobulin E (IgE) declines to be less than 2 kilounits of antibody per liter; this OFC will use 10 grams of egg white solid and be followed by an open feeding of egg.

At selected visits, blood and urine collection, physical examination, prick skin tests, and atopic dermatitis and asthma evaluations will occur.

Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immunobiology of Food Allergy and Its Treatment Immunobiology of Food Allergy and Its Treatment (CoFAR)
DOI: 10.21430/M3Q2O0X9Z5
Subjects: 55
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Wesley Burks Duke University Multiple sites
Stacie Jones Arkansas Children's Hospital Multiple sites
Publications:
Oral immunotherapy for treatment of egg allergy in children.. N Engl J Med. Jul 2012. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1200435. [Pubmed: 22808958]
Resources:
ClinicalTrials.gov http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00461097?term=NCT00461097]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 939
Flow Cytometry 2370
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY269: Systems Biology of 2008 Influenza Vaccination in Humans (See companion studies SDY61 2007 / SDY270 2009 / SDY271 Role for CaMKIV in the Regulation of Antibody Responses to Influenza Vaccine)
Status: Updated
Description: Using a systems biology approach to study innate and adaptive responses to influenza vaccination in humans during the 2008-2009 influenza season.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Human Immunology Project Consortium 1 (HIPC1) Systems Biological Analysis of Innate and Adaptive Responses to Vaccination
NIAID Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS) Influenza Pathogenesis & Immunology Research Center (IPIRC)
DOI: 10.21430/M3CDX6TL4I
Subjects: 63
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Bali Pulendran Emory University Emory Vaccine Center,
Publications:
Systems biology of vaccination for seasonal influenza in humans.. Nat Immunol. Jul 2011. doi: 10.1038/ni.2067. [Pubmed: 21743478]
Systems Analysis of Immunity to Influenza Vaccination across Multiple Years and in Diverse Populations Reveals Shared Molecular Signatures.. Immunity. Dec 2015. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2015.11.012. [Pubmed: 26682988]
Resources:
Emory Vaccine Center http://www.vaccines.emory.edu/]
Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE29615]
Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE29617]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISPOT 336
Flow Cytometry 59
Hemagglutination Inhibition 336
Luminex xMAP 168
Q-PCR 75
Transcription profiling by array 263
Clinical Assessments:None
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