DR22 DataRelease

SDY625: Anti-CD20 in SLE
Status: New
Description: B cells clearly play an essential role in the pathogenesis of SLE since they produce autoantibodies. Clinical observations support the contention that intervening in the production of autoantibodies by the B lymphocyte will be effective therapy. Current approved therapy for B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma includes anti-CD20. The results of anti-CD20 administration in SLE are anticipated to be similar to those in lymphoma patients. The current proposal explores the mechanisms and applicability of B-cell depletion as a potential treatment for SLE.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Autoimmunity Centers of Excellence (ACE) An Open-Label Safety and Efficacy Study of an Anti-CD20 Antibody (Rituximab, Rituxan) for Anti-B Cell Therapy in the Treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (AC002)
DOI: 10.21430/M3M92Y22FG
Subjects: 24
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Robert Eisenberg University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania
Publications:
A longitudinal analysis of SLE patients treated with rituximab (anti-CD20): factors associated with B lymphocyte recovery.. Clin Immunol. Mar 2008. doi: 10.1016/j.clim.2007.11.012. Epub 2008 Jan 15. [Pubmed: 18226586]
Variability in the biological response to anti-CD20 B cell depletion in systemic lupus erythaematosus.. Ann Rheum Dis. Dec 2008. doi: 10.1136/ard.2007.083162. Epub 2008 Feb 4. [Pubmed: 18250115]
Resources:
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00036491]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:
Global Assessment (VAS)
Health Assessment Questionnaire
SF-36
SLAM
SLEDAI
SLICC
SDY655: Use of Infliximab for the Treatment of Pemphigus Vulgaris
Status: New
Description: PV involves blistering of the outer layer of skin and mucous membranes, causing a separation of epidermal cells. The disease occurs when the immune system produces antibodies to specific proteins in the skin and mucous membranes; the cause for production of these autoantibodies is unknown. Infliximab is a genetically engineered monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, a chemical messenger that activates an immune response. Infliximab has been used to treat other autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease. This study will evaluate the safety and efficacy of infliximab given in combination with prednisone for the treatment of adults with PV.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Autoimmunity Centers of Excellence (ACE) MODULATION OF B CELL RESPONSES IN AUTOIMMUNITY (APV01)
DOI: 10.21430/M3ZTR9VQ2U
Subjects: 20
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Publications:
A multicentre randomized trial of the treatment of patients with pemphigus vulgaris with infliximab and prednisone compared with prednisone alone.. Br J Dermatol. Mar 2015. doi: 10.1111/bjd.13350. Epub 2015 Feb 5. [Pubmed: 25123295]
Resources:
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00283712]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 153
Clinical Assessments:
Dermatology Life Quality Index
Pemphigus Disease Area Index
SF-36
SDY824: Anti-TNF Agents in RA
Status: New
Description: This is a Phase IV, investigator-initiated, partially blinded, randomized, multi-center clinical trial designed to evaluate the mechanistic effects of TNF-a inhibition on clinical and mechanistic measures in RA patients. Subjects will be randomized to one of two active treatment arms, etanercept or adalimumab, and will receive treatment using standard dosing regimens for 24 weeks. Subjects will be randomized in a 2:1 ratio until 40 and 20 subjects are treated with etanercept and adalimumab, respectively. Clinical responses and serologic changes will be monitored throughout the study in all participants. Study visits are scheduled for Screening, Baseline/Treatment-Initiation, and at Weeks 12 and 24. In addition, to assess safety, blood draws are scheduled for Weeks 8 and16, and phone calls are scheduled for Weeks 4, 8, 16, and 20. In order to assess peripheral blood B and T cell changes after treatment initiation, all participating subjects will have a blood sample analyzed by flow cytometry for B and T cell subsets at Baseline/Treatment Initiation and Weeks 12 and 24. Etanercept drug levels will be assessed from samples drawn at Weeks 12 and 24 as study drug levels may impact clinical response.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Autoimmunity Centers of Excellence (ACE) Anti-TNF Agents in RA (ARA06)
DOI: 10.21430/M3LU5YSBYO
Subjects: 63
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Jennifer Anolik University of Rochester School of Medicine University of Rochester School of Medicine
Publications:None
Resources:
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00837434]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 540
Clinical Assessments:
Global Assessments
Health Assessment Questionnaire
Tender And Swollen Joint Assessment
SDY961: Use of Rituximab for Sjogren's Syndrome
Status: New
Description: This study is an open-label, one arm, Phase I study. The study intends to accrue 12 subjects with primary Sjogren's syndrome as defined by the revised European criteria proposed by the American-European Consensus Group over the course of 12 months. Eligible subjects will receive 2 infusions of rituximab at a dose of 1000 mg. The second treatment visit will be scheduled 14 days from the first infusion, within a window of 3 days. Following the treatment phase, subjects will enter a 50-week post-infusion follow-up period and receive no study medication. The sample size was chosen based on prior studies of rituximab treatment of SLE. This research protocol allows for 2 infusions of rituximab. Even if the treatment is shown to be of benefit, additional infusions of rituximab may not be given while the patient is participating in this study.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Autoimmunity Centers of Excellence (ACE) MODULATION OF B CELL RESPONSES IN AUTOIMMUNITY (ASJ01)
DOI: 10.21430/M3G6VGUDEH
Subjects: 12
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Philip Cohen University of Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania
William St. Clair Duke University Medical Center Duke University Medical Center
Publications:
Rituximab therapy for primary Sjogren's syndrome: an open-label clinical trial and mechanistic analysis.. Arthritis Rheum. Apr 2013. doi: 10.1002/art.37850. [Pubmed: 23334994]
Resources:
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00101829]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:
Global Assessment
International Classification Criteria for Sjogren's Syndrome
Salivary Gland Scintigraphy
Salivary Tests
Schirmers Test
SF-36
Sjogren's Syndrome Symptom Survey
SDY1041: CMV CD8 T Cells
Status: New
Description: We present human T cell responses in multiple sites including blood, lymphoid, mucosal and secretory tissues of 20 CMV seropositive donors. Overall, CMV-specific T cells were maintained in distinct distribution patterns, either predominant in blood, bone marrow (BM) and lung, or lymph nodes (LN) with the frequency and function in blood distinct from tissues. Together, our results reveal tissue T cell reservoirs for CMV control, with global effects on T cell homeostasis over the human lifespan.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Tissue compartmentalization of human lymphocytes P01AI106697 Tissue compartmentalization of human lymphocytes
DOI: 10.21430/M3MIPLU7ZU
Subjects: 20
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Donna Farber Columbia University CCTI
Publications:
Tissue reservoirs of antiviral T cell immunity in persistent human CMV infection.. J Exp Med. Mar 2017. doi: 10.1084/jem.20160758. Epub 2017 Jan 27. [Pubmed: 28130404]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 342
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1043: A Haystack Heuristic for Autoimmune Disease Biomarker Discovery Using Next-Gen Immune Repertoire Sequencing Data
Status: New
Description: In this work, we present a new algorithm that employs local search techniques to discover statistically significant patient-specific motifs in large-scale immune-repertoire datasets. We apply our methodology successfully to our multi-million-sequence immune repertoire dataset to discover a statistically significant MS-specific motif. The discovered sequence motif could potentially serve as biomarker for the clinical diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. The presented methodology is efficient and generalizable to other high throughput sequencing datasets.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Antibody Mediated Autoimmunity in Neuromyelitis Optica Antibody Mediated Autoimmunity in Neuromyelitis Optica
DOI: 10.21430/M3HUHJSPBP
Subjects: 97
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Marina Sirota University of California San Francisco University of California San Francisco
Publications:None
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
RNA sequencing 190
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1064: An Arntl2-Driven Secretome Enables Lung Adenocarcinoma Metastatic Self-Sufficiency
Status: New
Description: The ability of cancer cells to establish lethal metastatic lesions requires the survival and expansion of single cancer cells at distant sites. The factors controlling the clonal growth ability of individual cancer cells remain poorly understood. Here, we show that high expression of the transcription factor ARNTL2 predicts poor lung adenocarcinoma patient outcome. Arntl2 is required for metastatic ability in vivo and clonal growth in cell culture. Arntl2 drives metastatic self-sufficiency by orchestrating the expression of a complex pro-metastatic secretome. We identify Clock as an Arntl2 partner and functionally validate the matricellular protein Smoc2 as a pro-metastatic secreted factor. These findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms that enable single cancer cells to form allochthonous tumors in foreign tissue environments
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Enhance Applicability of Mouse Models for Translational Research (Oncology Model, OMF) A Quantitative Multiplexed Platform for the Pharmacogenomic Analysis of Lung Cancer (Oncology Model, OMF)
DOI: 10.21430/M3LJ1COIXP
Subjects: 2
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Monte Winslow Stanford Cancer Institute Stanford University
Publications:
An Arntl2-Driven Secretome Enables Lung Adenocarcinoma Metastatic Self-Sufficiency.. Cancer Cell. May 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.ccell.2016.03.003. Epub 2016 Apr 14. [Pubmed: 27150038]
Resources:
BioProject https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA295388]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
RNA sequencing 6
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1079: A targetable CD109-Janus kinase-Stat axis in metastatic lung cancer.
Status: New
Description: The molecular mechanism of lung cancer metastatic remains incompletely understood. We combined tumor barcoding in a mouse model of human lung adenocarcinoma with unbiased genomic approaches to identify a transcriptional program that confers metastatic ability and predicts patient survival. Small-scale in vivo screening identified several genes, including Cd109, that encode novel pro-metastatic factors. We uncovered signaling mediated by Janus kinases (Jaks) and the transcription factor Stat3 as a critical, pharmacologically targetable effector of CD109-driven lung cancer metastasis. In summary, by coupling the systematic genomic analysis of purified cancer cells in distinct malignant states from mouse models with extensive human validation, we uncovered several key regulators of metastatic ability, including an actionable pro-metastatic CD109?Jak?Stat3 axis
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Enhance Applicability of Mouse Models for Translational Research (Oncology Model, OMF) A Quantitative Multiplexed Platform for the Pharmacogenomic Analysis of Lung Cancer (Oncology Model, OMF)
DOI: 10.21430/M3HC3F4A8X
Subjects: 2
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Monte Winslow Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford University School of Medicine
Publications:
Molecular definition of a metastatic lung cancer state reveals a targetable CD109-Janus kinase-Stat axis.. Nat Med. Mar 2017. doi: 10.1038/nm.4285. Epub 2017 Feb 13. [Pubmed: 28191885]
Resources:
PRJNA329195 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA329195]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
RNA sequencing 60
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1085: RNAseq of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for NF1 Glioma Growth
Status: New
Description: Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Enhance Applicability of Mouse Models for Translational Research (Oncology Model, OMF) Leveraging Genetically-Engineered Mice to Optimize Pediatric Glioma Management
DOI: 10.21430/M3AZ2NQ0XP
Subjects: 6
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
David Gutmann Washington University School of Medicine Department of Neurology
Publications:
RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.. Neoplasia. Oct 2015. doi: 10.1016/j.neo.2015.10.002. [Pubmed: 26585233]
Resources:
PRJNA275242 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA275242]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
RNA sequencing 7
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1093: Apc Restoration in Colorectal Cancer
Status: New
Description: The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) tumor suppressor is mutated in the vast majority of human colorectal cancers (CRC) and leads to deregulated Wnt signaling. To determine whether Apc disruption is required for tumor maintenance, we developed a mouse model of CRC whereby Apc can be conditionally suppressed using a doxycycline-regulated shRNA. Apc suppression produces adenomas in both the small intestine and colon that, in the presence of Kras and p53 mutations, can progress to invasive carcinoma. In established tumors, Apc restoration drives rapid and widespread tumor-cell differentiation and sustained regression without relapse. Tumor regression is accompanied by the re-establishment of normal crypt-villus homeostasis, such that once aberrantly proliferating cells reacquire self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capability. Our study reveals that CRC cells can revert to functioning normal cells given appropriate signals, and provide compelling in vivo validation of the Wnt pathway as a therapeutic target for treatment of CRC
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Enhance Applicability of Mouse Models for Translational Research (Oncology Model, OMF) A scalable platform for target validation in GEMM models of gastrointestinal malignancies.
DOI: 10.21430/M3PC2VFTG8
Subjects: 20
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Scott Lowe Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Cancer Biology and Genetics Program
Publications:
Apc Restoration Promotes Cellular Differentiation and Reestablishes Crypt Homeostasis in Colorectal Cancer.. Cell. Jun 2015. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.05.033. [Pubmed: 26091037]
Resources:
PRJNA279201 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA27920]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
RNA sequencing 20
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1097: Early-life compartmentalization of human T cells
Status: New
Description: Knowledge of human immune responses during early life remains sparse, owing to the difficulty and impracticality of obtaining blood and tissue samples from infants. Our current view of normal infant immune responses, including T cell differentiation and function, is based mainly on the sampling of umbilical cord blood or fetal tissue, which reflect immune responses in utero but not responses to the diverse antigens encountered in early life. Fundamental information about the establishment of adaptive immunity during infancy, including how T cells respond, differentiate and populate tissue sites, remains undefined. Through collaboration with organ procurement agencies, we have established protocols for obtaining lymphoid and mucosal tissues from individual organ donors for whom consent has been given for the use of tissues for research.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Tissue compartmentalization of human lymphocytes P01AI106697 Tissue compartmentalization of human lymphocytes
DOI: 10.21430/M35HJN0H16
Subjects: 43
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Donna Farber Columbia University Columbia University Medical Center
Publications:
Early-life compartmentalization of human T cell differentiation and regulatory function in mucosal and lymphoid tissues. Nature Medicine Jan 2016. doi: 10.1038/nm.4008 [Pubmed: 26657141]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 358
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1099: DNMT3A Haploinsufficiency Transforms FLT3 ITD Myeloproliferative Disease into AML
Status: New
Description: Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) represents nearly 50% of human AML. Co-occurring mutations in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A and the FMS related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) are common in CN-AML and confer a poorer prognosis, but the molecular mechnism of the double-mutant is unknown. By using a rapid mouse model of FLT3/DNMT3A-Mutant AML and advanced global scRNAseq and methylation profiling techniques, the study demonstrates that DNMT3A haploinsufficiency results in reversible epigenetic alterations that transform FLT3 ITD -mutant myeloproliferative neoplasm into AML.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Enhance Applicability of Mouse Models for Translational Research (Oncology Model, OMF) A rapid spontaneous murine model of CN-AML (Oncology Model, OMF)
DOI: 10.21430/M3NA6MQNX3
Subjects: 8
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Leighton Grimes Cincinnati Children?s Hospital Medical Center Division of Immunobiology
Publications:
DNMT3A Haploinsufficiency Transforms FLT3ITD Myeloproliferative Disease into a Rapid, Spontaneous, and Fully Penetrant Acute Myeloid Leukemia.. Cancer Discov. May 2016. doi: 10.1158/2159-8290.CD-16-0008. Epub 2016 Mar 25. [Pubmed: 27016502]
Resources:
PRJNA311726 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA311726]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
RNA sequencing 102
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY196: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 1 2005-2006
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M3ABJS44K6
Subjects: 62
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 118
ELISPOT 248
Flow Cytometry 1868
Hemagglutination Inhibition 124
Western Blot 46
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY197: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 2 2006-2007
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M3FD1QTLQQ
Subjects: 63
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 126
ELISPOT 252
Flow Cytometry 2331
Hemagglutination Inhibition 188
Western Blot 47
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY198: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 3 2007-2008
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M3D393V41D
Subjects: 74
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 148
ELISPOT 296
Flow Cytometry 2733
Hemagglutination Inhibition 223
Western Blot 52
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY199: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 4 2008-2009
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M39YLN3479
Subjects: 69
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 138
ELISPOT 276
Flow Cytometry 2440
Hemagglutination Inhibition 207
Western Blot 43
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY200: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 5 2009-2010
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M3ZR6IH181
Subjects: 73
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 134
ELISPOT 280
Flow Cytometry 635
Hemagglutination Inhibition 207
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SDY201: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 6 2010-2011
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M35J0WA7CR
Subjects: 34
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 68
ELISPOT 136
Flow Cytometry 860
Hemagglutination Inhibition 102
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY691: HLA and KIR Haplotype Sequencing
Status: Updated
Description: Assay development for complete HLA and KIR haplotype sequencing from cell lines
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
HLA Region Genetics in Immune-mediated Diseases II Insights into immune-related disease born from population genomics
DOI: 10.21430/M3RES1FXTG
Subjects: 97
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Paul Norman Stanford Stanford
Publications:
Defining KIR and HLA Class I Genotypes at Highest Resolution via High-Throughput Sequencing.. Am J Hum Genet. Aug 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.06.023. [Pubmed: 27486779]
Sequences of 95 human MHC haplotypes reveal extreme coding variation in genes other than highly polymorphic HLA class I and II.. Genome Res. Mar 2017. doi: 10.1101/gr.213538.116. [Epub ahead of print] [Pubmed: 28360230]
Resources:
NCBI BioProject https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/?term=PRJEB6763]
GitHub https://github.com/n0rmski/projectH]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Sequencing 290
Clinical Assessments:None
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