DR5 DataRelease

SDY60: Decay of Memory T cells In Old Population
Status: New
Description: To expand our study of T cell memory repertoires in an aging population for which the repertoires may be decaying. These studies will provide data about the aging-specific dynamics of memory repertoires.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Generation and Decay of Memory T Cell in Young, Old and Immunocompromised Populations
DOI: 10.21430/M38OJI5XI0
Subjects: 70
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Jack Gorski BloodCenter of Wisconsin BloodCenter of Wisconsin
Publications:
Selective T cell expansion during aging of CD8 memory repertoires to influenza revealed by modeling.. J Immunol. Jun 2011. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1100091. Epub 2011 Apr 22. [Pubmed: 21515795]
Resources:
Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) http://www.iedb.org/reference/1022069]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 539
Other 106
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY110: Immune responses to Helicobacter pylori in a pig model
Status: New
Description: We have developed for the first time a pig model to study mucosal and systemic Th1 and CD8+ cytotoxic immune responses to H. pylori infection.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Modeling Immunity for Biodefense II Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Modeling Immunity for Biodefense Contract
DOI: 10.21430/M3WXZHC81N
Subjects: 15
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Josep Bassaganya-Riera NIMML VBI
Raquel Hontecillas NIMML VBI
Publications:
Helicobacter pylori infection in a pig model is dominated by Th1 and cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses.. Infect Immun. Oct 2013. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00660-13. Epub 2013 Jul 29. [Pubmed: 23897614]
Resources:
MIEP http://modelingimmunity.vbi.vt.edu/]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 171
Other 56
Q-PCR 76
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY148: The Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma in Immune Responses to Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Infection
Status: New
Description: Background: Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is recognized as an emerging cause of persistent diarrhea and enteric disease worldwide. Mucosal immunity towards EAEC infections is incompletely understood;due in part to the lack of appropriate animal models. This study presents a new mouse model and investigates the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARg) in the modulation of host responses to EAEC in nourished and malnourished mice. Methods/Principal Findings: Wild-type and T cell-specific PPARg null C57BL/6 mice were fed protein-deficient diets at weaning and challenged with 5x10^9 cfu EAEC strain JM221 to measure colonic gene expression and immune responses to EAEC. Antigen-specific responses to E. coli antigens were measured in nourished and malnourished mice following infection and demonstrated the immunosuppressive effects of malnutrition at the cellular level. At the molecular level, both pharmacological blockade and deletion of PPARg in T cells resulted in upregulation of Tgfb1, IL-6, IL-17 and anti-microbial peptides, enhanced Th17 responses, fewer colonic lesions, faster clearance of EAEC, and improved recovery. The beneficial effects of PPAR gamma blockade on weight loss and EAEC clearance were abrogated by neutralizing IL-17 in vivo. Conclusions: Our studies provide in vivo evidence in support of supporting the beneficial role of mucosal innate and effector T cell responses on the EAEC burden and suggest pharmacological blockade of PPARg as a novel therapeutic intervention for EAEC infection.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Modeling Immunity for Biodefense II Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Modeling Immunity for Biodefense Contract
DOI: 10.21430/M36I96JIIZ
Subjects: 243
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Raquel Hontecillas NIMML VBI
Publications:
The role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in immune responses to enteroaggregative Escherichia coli infection.. PLoS One. - 2013. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057812. Epub 2013 Feb 28. [Pubmed: 23469071]
Resources:
MIEP http://www.modelingimmunity.org/]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Other 345
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY214: Impact of Nutrition and Nitazoxanide on Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) Infection
Status: New
Description: Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is increasingly recognized as a common cause of diarrhoea in healthy, malnourished and immune-deficient adults and children. There is no reproducible non-neonatal animal model for longitudinal studies of disease mechanism or therapy. Using two strains of human-derived EAEC to challenge weaned C57BL/6 mice, we explored an in vivo model of EAEC infection in mice, in which disease was monitored quantitatively as the growth rate, stool shedding and tissue burden of organisms; nutritional status was varied, and a new class of therapeutics was assessed. A single oral challenge of EAEC strain 042 resulted in significant growth shortfalls (5-8?% of body weight in 12 days), persistent shedding of micro-organisms in stools [>10(3.2) c.f.u. (10 mg stool)(-1) for at least 14 days] and intestinal tissue burden [~10(3) c.f.u. (10 mg tissue)(-1) detectable up to 14 days post-challenge]. Moderate malnourishment of mice using a 'regional basic diet' containing 7?% protein and reduced fat and micronutrients heightened all parameters of infection. Nitazoxanide in subMIC doses, administered for 3 days at the time of EAEC challenge, lessened growth shortfalls (by >10?% of body weight), stool shedding [by 2-3 logs (10 mg stool)(-1)] and tissue burden of organisms (by >75?% in the jejunum and colon). Thus, weaned C57BL/6 mice challenged with EAEC is a convenient, readily inducible model of EAEC infection with three highly quantifiable outcomes in which disease severity is dependent on the nutritional status of the host, and which is modifiable in the presence of inhibitors of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase such as nitazoxanide.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Modeling Immunity for Biodefense II Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Modeling Immunity for Biodefense Contract
DOI: 10.21430/M3NQ3UF8O9
Subjects: 100
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Richard Guerrant UVA UVA
Raquel Hontecillas NIMML VBI
Josep Bassaganya-Riera NIMML VBI
Publications:
Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain in a novel weaned mouse model: exacerbation by malnutrition, biofilm as a virulence factor and treatment by nitazoxanide.. J Med Microbiol. Jun 2013. doi: 10.1099/jmm.0.046300-0. Epub 2013 Mar 8. [Pubmed: 23475903]
Resources:
MIEP http://www.modelingimmunity.org/]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY216: CD4+ T cell differentiation studies
Status: New
Description: Differentiation of CD4+ T cells into effector or regulatory phenotypes is tightly controlled by the cytokine milieu, complex intracellular signaling networks and numerous transcriptional regulators. We combined experimental approaches and computational modeling to investigate the mechanisms controlling differentiation and plasticity of CD4+ T cells in the gut of mice. Our computational model encompasses the major intracellular pathways involved in CD4+ T cell differentiation into T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17 and induced regulatory T cells (iTreg). Our modeling efforts predicted a critical role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARg) in modulating plasticity between Th17 and iTreg cells. PPARg regulates differentiation, activation and cytokine production, thereby controlling the induction of effector and regulatory responses, and is a promising therapeutic target for dysregulated immune responses and inflammation. Our modeling efforts predict that following PPARg activation, Th17 cells undergo phenotype switch and become iTreg cells. This prediction was validated by results of adoptive transfer studies showing an increase of colonic iTreg and a decrease of Th17 cells in the gut mucosa of mice with colitis following pharmacological activation of PPAR?. Deletion of PPARg in CD4+ T cells impaired mucosal iTreg and enhanced colitogenic Th17 responses in mice with CD4+ T cell-induced colitis. Thus, for the first time we provide novel molecular evidence in vivo demonstrating that PPARg in addition to regulating CD4+ T cell differentiation also plays a major role controlling Th17 and iTreg plasticity in the gut mucosa.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Modeling Immunity for Biodefense II Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Modeling Immunity for Biodefense Contract
DOI: 10.21430/M36YGDV91N
Subjects: 91
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Josep Bassaganya-Riera NIMML VBI
Raquel Hontecillas NIMML VBI
Publications:
Systems modeling of molecular mechanisms controlling cytokine-driven CD4+ T cell differentiation and phenotype plasticity.. PLoS Comput Biol. Apr 2013. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003027. Epub 2013 Apr 4. [Pubmed: 23592971]
Resources:
MIEP http://www.modelingimmunity.org/]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 300
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY225: Aerosol Inoculation with a Sub-lethal Influenza Virus Leads to Exacerbated Morbidity and Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis
Status: New
Description: A mouse model has been extensively used to investigate disease intervention approaches and correlates of immunity following influenza virus infection. IN and aerosol routes of inoculation were compared and end-points of immunity and disease pathogenesis were evaluated in mice using mouse-mouseadapted H3N2 A/Aichi/2/68 (x31).
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
NIAID Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS) Influenza Pathogenesis & Immunology Research Center (IPIRC)
DOI: 10.21430/M3SE0EVY36
Subjects: 5
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Ralph Tripp College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia
Publications:
Aerosol inoculation with a sub-lethal influenza virus leads to exacerbated morbidity and pulmonary disease pathogenesis.. Viral Immunol. Apr 2011. doi: 10.1089/vim.2010.0085. [Pubmed: 21449723]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 10
Luminex xMAP 2
Microscopy 16
Other 22
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY230: Predictive computational modeling of the mucosal immune responses during Helicobacter pylori infection
Status: New
Description: T helper (Th) cells play a major role in the modulation of immune responses at the gastric mucosa and lesion formation during Helicobacter pylori infection. The contributions of CD4+ T cell subsets to gastritis development and control of H. pylori colonization are not well understood. We used two computational approaches: ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based and agent-based modeling (ABM) to study the mechanisms underlying cellular immune responses to H. pylori and the influence of CD4+ T cell subsets in initiation, progression and outcome of disease. To calibrate the model, in vivo experimentation was performed by infecting C57BL/6 mice intragastrically with H. pylori and assaying immune cell subsets in the stomach and gastric lymph nodes (GLN) on days 0, 7, 14, 30 and 60 post-infection. Our computational model reproduced the dynamic behaviors of effector and regulatory pathways in the gastric lamina propria (LP) in silico. Simulation results show the induction of an initial Th17 response, followed by a dominant Th1 response, and a regulatory response characterized by high levels of mucosal iTreg cells. We also investigated the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) activation in the modulation of host responses to H. pylori by using loss-of-function approaches. Specifically, in silico results showed a predominance of Th1 and Th17 cells in the stomach of the cell-specific PPAR? knockout system when compared to the wild-type simulation. Our ABM suggested similar dynamics in the induction of host responses showing analogous T cell distributions to ODE modeling and facilitated tracking lesion formation. In addition, the myeloid cell-specific PPAR? knockout model illustrated increased Th17 differentiation in the gastric LP. These integrated immunoinformatics approaches characterized the induction of mucosal immunoregulatory pathways controlled by PPAR? during H. pylori infection that affect initiation, progression and outcome of disease.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Modeling Immunity for Biodefense II Virginia Bioinformatics Institute Modeling Immunity for Biodefense Contract
DOI: 10.21430/M37ANCFRHF
Subjects: 53
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Raquel Hontecillas NIMML VBI
Josep Bassaganya-Riera NIMML VBI
Publications:
Predictive computational modeling of the mucosal immune responses during Helicobacter pylori infection.. PLoS One. Sep 2013. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0073365. eCollection 2013. [Pubmed: 24039925]
Sensitivity Analysis of an ENteric Immunity SImulator (ENISI)-Based Model of Immune Responses to Helicobacter pylori Infection.. PLoS One. Sep 2015. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0136139. eCollection 2015. [Pubmed: 26327290]
Resources:
MIEP http://www.modelingimmunity.org/]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 58
Other 10
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY232: Determinants of human NK cell diversity by mass cytometry
Status: New
Description: Natural Killer (NK) cells play critical roles in immune defense and reproduction, yet remain the most poorly understood lymphocyte population. Because their activation is controlled by a variety of combinatorially expressed activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cell diversity and function are closely linked. To provide an unprecedented understanding of NK cell repertoire diversity, we used mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze 35 parameters, including 28 NK cell receptors, on peripheral blood NK cells from five sets of monozygotic twins and twelve unrelated donors of defined HLA and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotype. This analysis revealed a remarkable degree of NK cell diversity, with an estimated 6,000-30,000 phenotypic populations within an individual and >100,000 phenotypes in this population. Genetics largely determined inhibitory receptor expression, whereas activation receptor expression was heavily environmentally influenced. Therefore, NK cells may maintain self-tolerance through strictly regulated expression of inhibitory receptors, while using adaptable expression patterns of activating and costimulatory receptors to respond to pathogens and tumors. These findings further suggest the possibility that discrete NK cell subpopulations could be harnessed for immunotherapeutic strategies in the settings of infection, reproduction, and transplantation
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Human Immunology Project Consortium 1 (HIPC1) Vaccination and infection: indicators of immunological health and responsiveness
DOI: 10.21430/M3J7Z67HEA
Subjects: 22
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Catherine Blish Stanford University Stanford University
Publications:
Genetic and environmental determinants of human NK cell diversity revealed by mass cytometry.. Sci Transl Med. Oct 2013. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3006702. [Pubmed: 24154599]
Coordinated regulation of NK receptor expression in the maturing human immune system.. J Immunol. Nov 2014. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1401821. Epub 2014 Oct 6. [Pubmed: 25288567]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
CyTOF 22
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY196: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 1 2005-2006
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M3ABJS44K6
Subjects: 62
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 118
ELISPOT 248
Flow Cytometry 1868
Hemagglutination Inhibition 124
Western Blot 46
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY197: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 2 2006-2007
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M3FD1QTLQQ
Subjects: 63
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 126
ELISPOT 252
Flow Cytometry 2331
Hemagglutination Inhibition 188
Western Blot 47
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY198: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 3 2007-2008
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M3D393V41D
Subjects: 74
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 148
ELISPOT 296
Flow Cytometry 2733
Hemagglutination Inhibition 223
Western Blot 52
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY199: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 4 2008-2009
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M39YLN3479
Subjects: 69
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 138
ELISPOT 276
Flow Cytometry 2440
Hemagglutination Inhibition 207
Western Blot 43
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
SDY200: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 5 2009-2010
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M3ZR6IH181
Subjects: 73
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 134
ELISPOT 280
Flow Cytometry 635
Hemagglutination Inhibition 207
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SDY201: Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Year 6 2010-2011
Status: Updated
Description: Influenza is an important pathogen in the United States, with approximately 20,000 deaths per year, mainly among elderly people or those with underlying medical conditions that increase susceptibility to complications from the disease. In addition, considerable morbidity is associated with influenza with a significant impact in productivity in the workplace and home. Influenza has the potential for much more serious consequences as demonstrated by the appearance of four world-wide pandemics in the last century. In principle, serious influenza outbreaks can be prevented by vaccination. However, vaccination is complicated by two features: First, the influenza virus undergoes frequent mutations in the genes encoding the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), leading to the need to reformulate the vaccine every year. Second, the appearance of the rapidity with which influenza infections can spread. Thus, influenza holds significant potential as a bioterrorism agent. Lupus patients have an increased risk of infection and mount lower responses to vaccinations. The objectives of this study will use genetic, cellular and humoral techniques to identify and explain abnormalities in the immune response to influenza vaccination in lupus patients. The results will clarify vaccine effectiveness among affected patients, increase the understanding of immune dysregulation in lupus, and aid in establishing guidelines for the effective vaccination of lupus patients. The benefits to the subjects are not direct; however, information gained may improve responses of reducing or preventing influenza among the affected population. Additionally, with an increased understanding of the processes of lupus, targets for disease intervention or strategies for treatment may appear.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Immune Function and Biodefense in Children, Elderly, and Immunocompromised Populations Responses to Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus
DOI: 10.21430/M35J0WA7CR
Subjects: 34
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Linda Thompson Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Publications:
Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.. Arthritis Rheum. Aug 2011. doi: 10.1002/art.30388. [Pubmed: 21598235]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 68
ELISPOT 136
Flow Cytometry 860
Hemagglutination Inhibition 102
Clinical Assessments:
Medical History
SLE Panel
Back to top