DR35 DataRelease

SDY1414: Alloantibodies in Pediatric Heart Transplantation (CTOTC-04)
Status: New
Description: There is currently a renewed interest in alloantibodies in transplantation. In 1966, Kissmeyer and colleagues reported that pre-existing antibodies directed against donor cells could cause hyperacute rejection of the renal allograft. Three years later, in a landmark study, Patel and Terasaki showed that a lymphocytotoxic assay to identify donor-specific antibodies was highly predictive of acute graft failure. These observations led to the practice of performing prospective, donor-specific crossmatches by lymphocytotoxicity assay for all kidney transplants and for heart and lung transplants when the candidate has a positive panel reactive antibody (PRA) assay. A concept evolved that transplantations should not be performed across a positive cytotoxicity crossmatch. The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical outcomes of sensitized pediatric heart transplant recipients with a positive donor-specific cytotoxicity crossmatch and to compare this group with outcomes in nonsensitized heart transplant recipients. This study plans to enroll 370 pediatric heart transplant recipients over a period of 3 years. The follow-up period will last up to 3 years. All participants will be enrolled pretransplant. In the pretransplant phase, visits will occur every 6 months. These routine visits will continue until transplant or the end of the study. They will coincide with routine pretransplant status visits. At the time of transplant, the participants will be assigned to one of two groups. Group A will include participants who are allo-antibody negative (less than 10% by AHG CDC-PRA and ELISA in all DTT-treated serum samples). Cohort B will include participants who have the presence of a DTT-treated AHG CDC-PRA of greater than or equal to 10% and/or an ELISA-PRA greater than or equal to 10% in any pretransplant sample. Both cohorts will receive standard transplantation care. This study has no interventions. All participants will undergo regular blood tests, and, those in the sensitized group will have additional blood testing performed after the transplant and lasting until the end of the study. Post-transplant visits will occur while participants are recovering in the hospital; at Months 1, 3, and 6; and annually until the study closes. The information collected for the study include data from a physical exam, routine testing, adverse (AEs) and serious adverse (SAEs) events assessments, and blood collection. Each time a biopsy is done, the study will ask to review the biopsy tissue and to collect a sample. If stored tissue is not available, none will be collected.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation in Children (CTOT-C) RFA-AI-12-005 ALLOANTIBODIES IN CARDIAC TRANSPLANTATION - INTERVENTION, OUTCOMES AND MECHANISMS (CTOTC-04)
DOI: 10.21430/M3O03JFGI6
Subjects: 290
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Steven Webber University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Publications:
Incidence, characterization, and impact of newly detected donor-specific anti-HLA antibody in the first year after pediatric heart transplantation: A report from the CTOTC-04 study.. American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons Sep 2018. doi: 10.1111/ajt.14691 [Pubmed: 29442424]
Study rationale, design, and pretransplantation alloantibody status: A first report of Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation in Children-04 (CTOTC-04) in pediatric heart transplantation.. American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons Sep 2018. doi: 10.1111/ajt.14695 [Pubmed: 29446208]
Pediatric heart transplantation across a positive crossmatch: First year results from the CTOTC-04 multi-institutional study.. American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons Sep 2018. doi: 10.1111/ajt.14876 [Pubmed: 29673058]
Early outcomes for low-risk pediatric heart transplant recipients and steroid avoidance: A multicenter cohort study (Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation in Children - CTOTC-04).. The Journal of heart and lung transplantation : the official publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation Sep 2019. doi: 10.1016/j.healun.2019.06.006 [Pubmed: 31324444]
Hospital readmission following pediatric heart transplantation.. Pediatric transplantation Nov 2019. doi: 10.1111/petr.13561 [Pubmed: 31483086]
Resources:
ClinicalTrials.gov https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01005316]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Luminex xMAP 2558
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1618: Superior mouse eosinophil depletion in vivo targeting transgenic Siglec-8 instead of endogenous Siglec-F: mechanisms and pitfalls
Status: New
Description: We uncovered shortcomings when using certain antibodies that target Siglec-F to deplete mouse eosinophils, while administration of anti-Siglec-8 antibody to Siglec-8 transgenic mice works well.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Asthma and Allergic Diseases Cooperative Research Centers (AADCRC) RFA-AI-16-065 Using Siglecs and their ligands to treat allergic diseases SALTAD
DOI: 10.21430/M348T28T35
Subjects: 12
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Bruce Bochner Northwestern University Northwestern University
Publications:
Frontline Science: Superior mouse eosinophil depletion in vivo targeting transgenic Siglec-8 instead of endogenous Siglec-F: Mechanisms and pitfalls.. Journal of leukocyte biology Jul 2020. doi: 10.1002/JLB.3HI0120-381R [Pubmed: 32134149]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Flow Cytometry 244
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1626: Transcriptome and Regulatory Maps of Decidua-derived Stromal Cells Inform Gene Discovery in Preterm Birth
Status: New
Description: While a genetic component of preterm birth (PTB) has long been recognized and recently mapped by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the molecular determinants underlying PTB remain elusive. This stems in part from an incomplete availability of comprehensive functional genomic annotations in human cell types relevant to pregnancy and PTB. Here, we generated extensive transcriptional and chromatin annotations of cultured primary decidua-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) and in vitro differentiated decidual stromal cells (DSCs) and developed a computational framework to integrate these functional annotations with results from a GWAS of gestational duration in 56,384 women. This resulted in a significant enrichment of heritability estimates in functional noncoding regions in stromal cells, as well as in the discovery of additional loci associated with gestational duration and target genes of associated loci.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
March of Dimes March of Dimes
DOI: 10.21430/M3FQ76H3IG
Subjects: 0
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Marcelo Nobrega University of Chicago Department of Human Genetics
Publications:None
Resources:
GEO Reference_PGR https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE94038]
GEO Reference_NR2F2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE52008]
GEO Reference_FOSL2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE94038]
GEO Reference_FOXO1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE94037]
GEO Reference_input-NR2F2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE52008]
GEO Reference_input-FOXO1+PolII+PGR+FOSL2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE94038]
GEO Reference_GATA2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE108409]
GEO Reference_input-GATA2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE108409]
Price Lab website https://data.broadinstitute.org/alkesgroup/LDSCORE/]
Source code for the GWAS enrichment analyses https://github.com/CreRecombinase/ptb_workflowr]
H3K27ac_H3K4me1_and H4K4me3 histone modification peak coordinates https://egg2.wustl.edu/roadmap/data/byFileType/peaks/consolidated/narrowPeak/ucsc_compatible/]
Biorxiv https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.06.017079v2]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1627: Single-site, five-year experience with human eosinophil isolation by density gradient centrifugation and CD16 immunomagnetic negative separation
Status: New
Description: Little has been reported regarding the reliability of methods for the purification of human blood eosinophils. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with 350 consecutive eosinophil isolations.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Asthma and Allergic Diseases Cooperative Research Centers (AADCRC) RFA-AI-16-065 Using Siglecs and their ligands to treat allergic diseases SALTAD
DOI: 10.21430/M35EOMB2WH
Subjects: 83
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Bruce Bochner Northwestern University Northwestern University
Publications:None
Resources:
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1632: T cell and chemokine receptor control of CD8 T cell motility after influenza infection
Status: New
Description: In mice, experimental influenza virus infection stimulates CD8 T cell infiltration of the airways. Virus is cleared by day 9, and between days 8 and 9 there is an abrupt change in CD8 T cell motility behavior transitioning from low velocity and high confinement on day 8, to high velocity with continued high confinement on day 9. We hypothesized that loss of virus and/or antigen signals in the context of high chemokine levels drives the T cells into a rapid surveillance mode. Virus infection induces chemokine production, which may change when the virus is cleared. We therefore sought to examine this period of rapid changes to the T cell environment in the tissue and seek evidence on the roles of peptide-MHC and chemokine receptor interactions. Experiments were performed to block G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling with Pertussis toxin (Ptx). Ptx treatment generally reduced cell velocities and mildly increased confinement suggesting chemokine mediated arrest (velocity <2 ?m/min) [1], except on day 8 when velocity increased and confinement was relieved. Blocking specific peptide-MHC with monoclonal antibody unexpectedly decreased velocities on days 7 through 9, suggesting TCR/peptide-MHC interactions promote cell mobility in the tissue. Together, these results suggest the T cells are engaged with antigen bearing and chemokine producing cells that affect motility in ways that vary with the day after infection. The increase in velocities on day 9 were reversed by addition of specific peptide, consistent with the idea that antigen signals become limiting on day 9 compared to earlier time points. Thus, antigen and chemokine signals act to alternately promote and restrict CD8 T cell motility until the point of virus clearance, suggesting the switch in motility behavior on day 9 may be due to a combination of limiting antigen in the presence of high chemokine signals as the virus is cleared.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Respiratory Pathogens Research Center (RPRC) Respiratory Pathogens Research Center (RPRC)
DOI: 10.21430/M3H6B9CA5D
Subjects: 27
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
David Topham University of Rochester University of Rochester CVBI
Publications:None
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Microscopy 55
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1636: Crowdsourcing Assessment of Maternal Blood Multi-omics for Predicting Gestational Age and Preterm Birth
Status: New
Description: Identification of pregnancies at risk of preterm birth (PTB), the leading cause of newborn deaths, remains challenging given the syndromic nature of the disease. We report a longitudinal multi-omics study coupled with a DREAM challenge to develop predictive models of PTB. We found that whole blood gene expression predicts ultrasound-based gestational ages in normal and complicated pregnancies, as well as the delivery date in normal pregnancies, with an accuracy similar to ultrasound. However, unlike the latter, transcriptomic data collected <37 weeks of gestation predicted the delivery date of one third of spontaneous (sPTB) cases within 2 weeks of the actual date. When only those samples collected <33 weeks from asymptomatic women were used, we found expression changes preceding preterm prelabor rupture of the membranes that were consistent across time points and cohorts, involving, among others, leukocyte-mediated immunity. Plasma proteomic data predicted sPTB with higher accuracy and earlier in pregnancy than whole blood transcriptomic data.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
March of Dimes March of Dimes
DOI: 10.21430/M31T6SHTYD
Subjects: 0
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
James Costello University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Department of Pharmacology
Publications:None
Resources:
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1637: Immune phenotyping of diverse syngeneic murine brain tumors identifies immunologically distinct types (see companion study SDY1658)
Status: New
Description: Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach to treat cancer, however, its efficacy in highly malignant brain-tumors, glioblastomas (GBM), is limited. We generated distinct imageable syngeneic mouse GBM-tumor models and utilized RNA-sequencing, CyTOF and correlative immunohistochemistry to assess immune-profiles in these models. We identified immunologically-inert and active syngeneic tumor types and show that inert tumors have an immune-suppressive phenotype with numerous exhausted CD8 T cells, resident macrophages and fewer eosinophils and SiglecF+ macrophages. To mimic the clinical settings of first line of GBM-treatment, we show that tumor-resection invigorates an anti-tumor response via increasing T cells, activated microglia and SiglecF+ macrophages and decrease in resident macrophages. A comparative CyTOF analysis of resected-tumor samples from GBM patients and mouse GBM-tumors showed stark similarities in one of the mouse GBM-tumors tested. These findings guide informed choices for use of GBM models for immunotherapeutic interventions and offer a potential to facilitate immune-therapies in GBM patients.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
NIAID Program Research Project Grant (Parent R01) In Vivo Imaging Of The Stem Cell Loaded Oncolytic Viruses For Cancer Therapy
DOI: 10.21430/M37FYK2I9O
Subjects: 5
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Khalid Shah Brigham and Women's Hospital Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging
Publications:None
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
CyTOF 12
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1641: Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors improve the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 patients with hypertension
Status: New
Description: The dysfunction of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been observed in coronavirus infection disease (COVID-19) patients, but whether RAS inhibitors, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), are associated with clinical outcomes remains unknown. COVID-19 patients with hypertension were enrolled to evaluate the effect of RAS inhibitors.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Non-NIH funding programs National Natural Science Foundation of China
DOI: 10.21430/M3YGG9R72B
Subjects: 42
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Guoliang Zhang National Clinical Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Shenzhen Third People?s Hospital Shenzhen Third People?s Hospital
Publications:
Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors improve the clinical outcomes of COVID-19 patients with hypertension.. Emerging microbes & infections Dec 2020. doi: 10.1080/22221751.2020.1746200 [Pubmed: 32228222]
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
ELISA 126
Clinical Assessments:
Comorbidity
Hospitalization Assessments
Hypertension
Mean arterial pressure
SDY1642: Establishment of Vaginal Microbiota Composition in Early Pregnancy and its Association with Subsequent Preterm Prelabor Rupture of the Fetal Membrane
Status: New
Description: Vaginal bacterial community composition influences pregnancy outcome. Preterm prelabor rupture of the fetal membranes (PPROM), which precedes 30% of all spontaneous preterm births, is associated with high vaginal bacterial diversity prior to rupture. The point at which vaginal bacterial diversity is established before PPROM is unknown. In this study, we use metataxonomics to longitudinally characterize the vaginal bacterial composition from as early as 6 weeks of gestation in women at high (n = 38) and low (n = 22) risk of preterm birth who subsequently experience PPROM and in women delivering at term without complications (n = 36). Reduced Lactobacillus spp. abundance and high diversity was observed prior to PPROM in 20% and 26% of women at low and high risk of preterm births respectively, but in only 3% of women who delivered at term. PPROM was associated with instability of bacterial community structure during pregnancy and a shift toward higher diversity predominately occurring during the second trimester. This was characterized by increased relative abundance of potentially pathogenic species including Prevotella, Peptoniphilus, Streptococcus, and Dialister. This study identifies reduced Lactobacillus spp. abundance and increasing vaginal bacterial diversity as an early risk factor for PPROM and highlights the need for interventional studies designed to assess the impact of modifying vaginal bacterial composition for the prevention of preterm birth.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
March of Dimes March of Dimes
DOI: 10.21430/M3GL2SM9XS
Subjects: 0
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
David MacIntyre Imperial College London March of Dimes European Preterm Birth Research Centre
Publications:
Establishment of vaginal microbiota composition in early pregnancy and its association with subsequent preterm prelabor rupture of the fetal membranes.. Translational research : the journal of laboratory and clinical medicine May 2019. doi: 10.1016/j.trsl.2018.12.005 [Pubmed: 30633889]
Resources:
Silva Bacterial Database https://www.arb-silva.de/]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1649: Cervicovaginal Microbiota and Local Immune Response Modulate the Risk of Spontaneous Preterm Delivery
Status: New
Description: Failure to predict and understand the causes of preterm birth, the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, have limited effective interventions and therapeutics. From a cohort of 2000 pregnant women, we performed a nested case control study on 107 well-phenotyped cases of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) and 432 women delivering at term. Using innovative Bayesian modeling of cervicovaginal microbiota, seven bacterial taxa were significantly associated with increased risk of sPTB, with a stronger effect in African American women. However, higher vaginal levels of beta-defensin-2 lowered the risk of sPTB associated with cervicovaginal microbiota in an ethnicity-dependent manner. Surprisingly, even in Lactobacillus spp. dominated cervicovaginal microbiota, low beta-defensin-2 was associated with increased risk of sPTB. These findings hold promise for diagnostics to accurately identify women at risk for sPTB early in pregnancy. Therapeutic strategies could include immune modulators and microbiome-based therapeutics to reduce this significant health burden.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
March of Dimes March of Dimes
DOI: 10.21430/M3LUWFE0DS
Subjects: 0
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Jacques Ravel University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Publications:
Cervicovaginal microbiota and local immune response modulate the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery.. Nature communications Mar 2019. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-09285-9 [Pubmed: 30899005]
Resources:
dbGap (sequence data) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/gap/cgi-bin/study.cgi?study_id=phs001739.v1.p1]
DADA2 Workflow for Big Data (data processing) https://benjjneb.github.io/dada2/bigdata.html]
PECAN (taxonomy) http://ravel-lab.org/pecan]
Scripts used in statistical analysis https://github.com/ravel-lab/M_and_M]
rms R package (bacterial diversity/abundance analysis on gestational age) https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/rms/rms.pdf]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1656: Sublingual Cockroach Safety Study (SCSS) (ICAC-10)
Status: New
Description: Immunotherapy may help reduce symptoms of allergy and asthma. Problems concerning compliance and adverse events with subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy have generated interest in delivering immunotherapy sublingually (under the tongue). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of a cockroach extract given sublingually to people with perennial (year-round) allergic rhinitis, with or without asthma.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Inner City Asthma Consortium (ICAC) RFA-AI-13-036 Inner City Asthma Consortium (ICAC)
DOI: 10.21430/M36VE0UMF1
Subjects: 28
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Robert Wood Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Publications:
Development of cockroach immunotherapy by the Inner-City Asthma Consortium.. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology Mar 2014. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2013.08.047 [Pubmed: 24184147]
Resources:
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00434421]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1657: The Underlying Mechanisms For S. Aureus Infection And Colonization Of Skin in People With Atopic Dermatitis With And Without Eczema Herpeticum (MRSA) (ADVN-10)
Status: New
Description: The emergence of drug-resistant staphylococcal strains was first seen in the US almost a decade ago, when the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported four fatal community-based MRSA infections in children. In recent years, MRSA has grown into a serious public health concern with an increasing number of both hospital-acquired and community-acquired cases being seen. There will be approximately 130 participants recruited for this trial. The study population will consist of people with Atopic Dermatitis (AD) and people without Atopic Dermatitis (non-atopic). AD is a skin disorder with an itchy, red skin rash. People with AD are more likely to get bacterial and viral skin infections, possibly because they lack certain proteins in their skin, which help the body's immune system to fight infections. AD people with a history of Eczema Herpeticum (EH) may also be at greater risk for being infected with MRSA. This could be due to extended treatment courses with staphylococcal antibiotics, especially because overuse and misuse of antibiotics can lead to bacterial antibiotic resistance. The precise reasons are unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons for infection in AD participants with and without a history of EH. Investigators are seeking to recruit patients with either Methicillin-sensitive staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) or MRSA bacteria on their skin, so that they may adequately study potential factors related to MRSA infection. Investigators will determine if the MRSA collected from people with AD is primarily community or hospital associated. They will also determine if the proteins on the skin of ADEH+ people with MRSA differ from the proteins on the skin of AD people with MSSA or people without AD, or if there are any marked differences in serum total IgE levels between AD subjects with MRSA, MSSA, or without S. aureus. Approximately 60 ADEH+ and 60 ADEH- participants will need to be enrolled to find participants with MRSA or MSSA on their skin. Presence of these bacteria on the skin can only be determined once skin swabs are collected and tested. If participants are deemed eligible at screening, they will continue on to the study visit, which will last for approximately 2-3 hours. At the study visit, participants will be asked to provide information related to their medical history including infection, hospitalization, and medication record. Additionally, a skin exam will be performed to verify diagnosis (ADEH-, ADEH+, or non-atopic); nasal and skin swabs samples will be collected; tape strippings samples will be collected; and a blood sample will be collected.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Atopic Dermatitis & Vaccinia Network (ADVN) Atopic Dermatitis and Vaccinia Network (ADVN) Clinical Studies Consort-26629c
Atopic Dermatitis Research Network (ADRN) RFA-AI-14-033 Atopic Dermatitis Research Network (ADRN)
DOI: 10.21430/M35H10G9TD
Subjects: 65
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Donald Leung National Jewish Health National Jewish Health
Publications:
Superantigen profile of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from patients with steroid-resistant atopic dermatitis.. Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America May 2008. doi: 10.1086/586746 [Pubmed: 18419342]
Resources:
ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00822276]
Assays:None
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1658: A comparative CyTOF analysis of resected-tumor samples from human GBM patients and mouse GBM-tumors (see companion study SDY1637)
Status: New
Description: Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach to treat cancer, however, its efficacy in highly malignant brain-tumors, glioblastomas (GBM), is limited. We generated distinct imageable syngeneic mouse GBM-tumor models and utilized RNA-sequencing, CyTOF and correlative immunohistochemistry to assess immune-profiles in these models. We identified immunologically-inert and active syngeneic tumor types and show that inert tumors have an immune-suppressive phenotype with numerous exhausted CD8 T cells, resident macrophages and fewer eosinophils and SiglecF+ macrophages. To mimic the clinical settings of first line of GBM-treatment, we show that tumor-resection invigorates an anti-tumor response via increasing T cells, activated microglia and SiglecF+ macrophages and decrease in resident macrophages. A comparative CyTOF analysis of resected-tumor samples from GBM patients and mouse GBM-tumors showed stark similarities in one of the mouse GBM-tumors tested. These findings guide informed choices for use of GBM models for immunotherapeutic interventions and offer a potential to facilitate immune-therapies in GBM patients.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
NIAID Program Research Project Grant (Parent R01) In Vivo Imaging Of The Stem Cell Loaded Oncolytic Viruses For Cancer Therapy
DOI: 10.21430/M3QCK8H0YH
Subjects: 16
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Khalid Shah Brigham and Women's Hospital Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging
Publications:None
Resources:
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
CyTOF 11
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY520: Immunologic and genomic signatures of influenza vaccine response - 2013 (see companion studies SDY63, SDY404, SDY400)
Status: Updated
Description: Project 1: Immunologic and genomic signatures of influenza vaccine response - year4 2013
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Human Immunology Project Consortium (HIPC) RFA-AI-14-007, RFA-AI-09-040 Defining signatures for immune responsiveness by functional systems immunology HIPC1
DOI: 10.21430/M3KVVHM735
Subjects: 61
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
David Hafler Yale Yale
Publications:None
Resources:
NA NA]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
Hemagglutination Inhibition 114
Transcription profiling by array 98
Clinical Assessments:None
SDY1468: B-cell Immunity to Influenza (SLVP017) 2010
Status: Updated
Description: Systems biology approach to examine effects of seasonal flu vaccination in adults of different ages on gene expression, cytokine stimulation and serum cytokines with parameters such as immune senescence to uncover new markers and mechanisms behind failure of immune function in many older people.
Program/Contract:
ProgramContract
Human Immunology Project Consortium (HIPC) RFA-AI-14-007, RFA-AI-09-040 Vaccination and infection: indicators of immunological health and responsiveness
DOI: 10.21430/M30IB1ZZDJ
Subjects: 71
Study PI, contact:
NameOrganizationSite
Mark Davis Stanford University Stanford University
Publications:
The FluPRINT dataset, a multidimensional analysis of the influenza vaccine imprint on the immune system.. Scientific data Oct 2019. doi: 10.1038/s41597-019-0213-4 [Pubmed: 31636302]
Resources:
CliicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03020498]
Assays:
Assay TypeNumber of Exp. Samples
CyTOF 63
Hemagglutination Inhibition 420
Luminex xMAP 390
Clinical Assessments:None
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